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Full text of "Pacific Rural Press (Jan.-June 1887)"

33 



California Slate Library 




When, from whom, nml koto thin volume was obtained, 
with the price paid, if any, may be found opponite 
the above viimber in the Hegister of Books, 
whii-h in alioays open to innpection. 



Extract fro in the Political Code. 

Skction 2296. Books may be taken from the Library 
by the mkmrkrs ok thk Lkgisi.atukk, during thk skssions 
THKKKoF, and by other State oHicers at any time. 

^fx.'. 22y8. 'i'lie Controller, if notitieil by the Librarian 
that any oliieer has failed to relnrii books taken by him 
within the time pieseribed by the Rules, and after de- 
mand rnaile, must not draw liis warrant for the salary of 
such oHieer until the return is made, or three times the 
value of the hooks, or of any injuries thereto, has been 
paid to the Librarian. 

Ski-. 22yy. Every jjerson who injures or fails to return 
any book tnken is liable to the Librarian in three times 
the value thereof. 

No person shall take or detain from the General Library 
more than two volumes at any one time, or for a longer 
period than two weeks. Books ok kkfkrkxck small not 

BK TAKKN KKllM THK LiBRAKV AT ANY TISIK. — [Extract frOIH 

the Uules.] 

W"The Foregoing Regulations will be strictly enforced, n 




I 



\ 



DIY. 1898. 




Vol. XXXIII.-No. l.-" 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY. JANUARY 1. 1887. 



j $3 a Year, in Advance 

( SiNiii.E OoriES, 10 Cth. 



Our New Citizens. 

The House in passing the Senate bill allotting 
lands in severalty to the Indians has covered 
itself with credit. There was no opposition to 
the measure, and the only danger it incurred 
was that of being talked to death, as nearly 
every member had views on the Indian question. 
This bill goes a long way toward atoning 
for our errors and blunders in the past. 
It changes the whole attitude of this 
people toward the Government and fur- 
nishes a powerful incentive to civiliza- 
tion. Under the old system no Indian 
owned any land in particular; what 
rights and interests he had were merged 
ia the tribe. The tribe owned the reser- 
vation. The Government dealt with the 
tribe and not with individuals. They 
were not responsible to the Territorial 
courts for violating the law. They paid 
no taxes. They had no votes. Even their 
persons and property were not secured 
and protected by the civil tribunals. In 
short, they were almost wholly outside 
the pale of civilization, and treaty com- 
pacts, big talks and pow-wows and as- 
sumed guardianship only tended to per- 
petuate the tribal instinct, and hered- 
itary nomadic, savage, lawless habits. 

Now all this will be changed. The bill 
as it now stands provides for the survey 
of the reservations and the allotment of 
the lands in severalty to the members of 
the tribe. To each head of a family, 
one-quarter section; to each single person 
over eighteen years, one eighth of a sec- 
tion; to each orphan under eighteen 
years, one-eighth of a section ; and to 
all other persons under the age of 
eighteen now living, or who may be born 
prior to the date of the order of the Sec- 
retary of the Interior directing an allot- 
ment, one-sixteenth of a section. If the 
reservation does not contain land enough 
to go around on this basis, then it shall 
be allotted pro rata, and all lands unfit 
for agricultural purposes, only adapted 
to grazing, the allotments are doubled 
in quantity. All the rights and privileges 
of citizenship are conferred upon every 
Indian who has beea made the recipient 
of such allotment, or who voluntarily 
adopts the habits of civilization. A pre- 
cautionary clause prevents any convey- 
ance of these allotted lands for the period 
of 25 years, a length of time, it is be- 
lieved, to be sufficient to teach each 
Indian the value of their possessions and 
beget industrial habits. They are made 
subject to the State or Territorial laws 
as other citizens. It is believed, with 
these advantages and incentives con- 
nected with the existing educational 
privileges, the Indians will ultimately solve the 
problem which has so long been an " elephant " 
in legislation and vexed the white settlers. 



Jack-Rabbits are as great a nuisance in 
Eastern Oregon as in portions of this State. 
So, according to an exchange, W. L. Geary & 
Co., of Ontario, propose to kill them off whole- 
sale and ship them East. They have secured 
the low rate of $1 per hundred from the Union 
Pacific from Ontario to Chicago, and will con- 
sign a carload to a Chicago commission house 



Ageiculttjeal Dikectors. — On the 28th 
ult.. Gov. Stoneman made the following ap- 
pointments of Directors of Agricultural Dis- 
tricts : District No. 9— S. F. Pine, vice S. S. 
Ricks, term expired; R. .J. Bugbee, vice G. A. 
Dungan, term expired. District No. 2 — James 
A. Louttit, vice self, term expired; R. C. Sar- 
gent, vice self, term expired. District No. 12 — 




A New Year's Outing. 

California climate, universally kind, is per- 
haps kindest to the babies, and the jolly health 
of our youngsters is the admiration of tourists 
and the pride of parents. Even the city babies, 
who do not have the best California climate, 
nor a good chance to enjoy what they have, 
compare favorably with city babies the 
world over, and the health and rosiness 
of the rural and suburban children of 
California are becoming proverbial. 
With a little care in keeping them with- 
in doors while the heavy storms are on, 
and protecting the younger ones from the 
chill of damp mornings and evenings, 
the child can practically lead an out-of- 
door life in California, even during the 
months marked winter on the calendar. 
Contrast the picture on this page, which 
fairly represents such a ramble as the lit- 
tle ones might have with the milkmaid 
on New Year's morning in California, 
with any New Year's morning scene 
which could be drawn in the open air at 
the East, and one can easily assure him- 
self of the blessing the California cli- 
mate is to the children. Of course with 
our vast area and great altitudes we 
have some parts of the State where the 
snowshoe might be the symbol of winter 
sports, but over nine-tenths of the set- 
tled portions of the commonwealth the 
children have full opportunity for what 
are summer sports at the East. Baseball 
playing, hoop-trundling and marble 
games are standing winter avocations, 
and are diligently pursued except when 
the heavy rains drive the youngsters to 
the shelter of the home. 



Pomology in Los Angeles.— The sev- 
enth quarterly meeting and fair of the 
Los Angeles County Pomological Society 
will be held at Spurgeon hall in Santa 
Ana, Jan. 6, 1887, at 10 a. m. The pro- 
gram, as arranged by the committee, in- 
cludes an essay on the question, How to 
make an alfalfa patch of one acre and 
what may be expected from it, by W. Z. 
Cook; papers on Red Scale, by D. W. 
Coquillet; Raisiu Grapes, by D. Edson 
Smith; and Apricot Culture, by J. B. 
Parker. After the reading of each essay 
by its author, five-minute speeches will 
be allowed members of the society in 
which to ask and answer questions on 
the subject. A lively time is anticipated. 



A RAMBLE ON A SUNNY NEW YEAR'S MORNING IN CALIFORNIA. 



Drawback on Grain Bags. — A dispatch 
from Washington states that Acting Secretary 
Fairchild has approved the recommendation 
made by the Collector of Customs at S. F., that 
manufacturers of grain bags entitled to draw- 
back on bags exported be required to reimburse 
to the Government all expenses attending the 
ascertainment of the amount of drawback due. 



by way of experiment. If the scheme succeeds, 
the firm writes that they can ship two carloads 
weekly, of 9000 rabbits per car, for the next 
three months. This will be a godsend to the 
poor of Eastern cities, who, for 25 cents, can 
have a big rabbit for dinner, and it ought to 
succeed. The firm pay hunters four cents 
apiece and ship in refrigerator cars. 



R1VER.SIDE isto have its first street-car line 
in a few days. The track is being laid and the 
cars are now en route from New York. 



J. M. Mannon, vice B. B. Campbell, resigned; 
F. O. Townsend, vice P. J. Muir, term ex- 
pired; Maurice Keating, vice R. F. Miles, term 
expired. 

The new bridge across Bear river is a fine 
piece of work, and will be a decided conven- 
ience to the people of Yuba, Sutter and Placer 
counties. The work, however, was paid for by 
Yuba and Sutter counties. It is 901 feet in 
length and 18 feet wide. The spans are each 
60 feet in length, and thore are 15 of them. 



Grape-Growers' Meeting. — Mr. E. 
H. Rixford, secretary, sends us the an- 
nouncement that a regular meeting of 
the Grape-Growers' and Wine-Makers' 
Association of California will be held 
at the rooms of the Viticultural Commission, 
204 Montgomery street, San Francisco, on 
Tuesday, January 4, 1887, at 11 o'clock. Prof. 
Hilgard will show the results of nine different 
modes of fermentation, with samples and with 
large diagrams, by which the facts can be 
readily shown to the eye. We believe that all 
vine-growers are invited to attend. 



A FARMER of San Joaquin county, has harvest- 
ed 50,000 sacks of potatoes from 500 acres of 
land, and expects to realize $50,000. 



2 



fAClFie R.U 



RAlo PRESS. 



[Jan. 1, 1887 



C(oRRESPO;^JDENCE. 

CorreepotideDts are alone reaponsible tor their opinions- 



Artisan Farmers. • 

Editors Press: — It has been frequently Baid, 
and currently believed, that a Jack-of-all-trades 
was master of none, and therefore rather under 
the ban of society. 

In these modern days of machine work, there 
is but little use or employment in factories for 
master mechanics, except in the general manage- 
ment, when it is necessary for the superintend- 
ent to know almost everything about the work 
in hand, while the remaining employes are 
specialists and only expected to know a very 
few things concerning the work of the factory. 

This kind of a mechanical education is of 
very little use outside the factory, and for this 
reason there are so many helpless persons seek- 
ing employment during the hard times, when 
the factories are closed. 

A Jack-of-all-trades meets no such difficulty, 
as he can turn his hand to meet the situation, 
and is therefore more secure in a living than 
the ordinary mechanic of to-day. 

A farmer that only knows how to plow, seed, 
and harvest his crop is greatly handicapped in 
his business, as his dependence on his fellow- 
men for everything else required in connection 
with farming will, perhaps, cost more in time 
and money, aiJd through losses from ignorance 
in the use of his implements and machinery, 
than he can possibly make by his farming. 

Such farming would become monotonous to 
any one, and it is not surprising that in time 
the yonng men on such farms will desire to 
leave. Besides, in this country the making of a 
crop of grain or hay requires but a small por- 
tion of the year's time, and unless there is some- 
thing else to do, much time is not only wasted, 
but lazy and dissolute habits are formed that 
will wreck them effectually in a short time. 

Mixed farming will, of course, occupy more 
of the farmer's time. Yet, not all, but every 
spare moment of a farmer's time could be util 
ized, if he has a good shop with a motive power 
in it, and with an assortment of good tools. 

Rainy and broken day — long winter evening, 
can all be made profitable, with a good, com- 
fortable, well-fitted shop, near the house, so 
that the good housewife, and her sons and 
daughters, may be as comfortable there as in 
the house. The children can be learning from 
the father the handicraft of the farm, and be- 
come interested in the various ingenious meth- 
ods that may be adopted, in the absence of the 
right thing, to temporarily surmount a diffi- 
culty. These difficult questions arise constantly 
in the country, and will arouse all the in- 
genuity of the whole family at times. 

The constant exercise of the brain in this di- 
rection, together with good facilities in the 
way of tools and material, would necessarily 
educate the farmer and his family gradually, 
until the boys at manhood would have a good, 
all-round, mechanical education, that would in- 
sure them a good living in any country. 

The constant employment of the boys, in se- 
curing such an education, would make them 
contented and useful on the farm, and inde- 
pendent for life. They would become more 
valuable as citizens and parents, after an indus- 
trial life, than if allowed to roam about with- 
out anything to do much of their time. 

With boys having a natural bent toward 
mechanics, there is nothing, perhaps, that 
would so agreeably engross their time and at- 
tention so proHcably as a nice shop, with good 
tools and plenty of material. 

A small library of books on mechanics would 
be of great advantage, and to start a shop with 
power a Jack-of-all-trades would be found very 
useful to give the business a good send-off. 
There are thousands of places on this coast 
where water-power can be had with a moderate 
investment, and there is no power more con- 
venient, economical and valuable in all respects 
than water. 

■ The great drawback to nearly all farmers' 
shops is the difficulty and labor in keeping the 
tools in order — and nothing will be remembered 
longer by the farmer's son than the drudgery of 
tnrning the grindstone. With a stone of good 
grit, well balanced and smooth and true on the 
face, attached to a water-power that any boy 
could manage, the work of keeping t<$ols in 
order would be a pleasure, and the tools would 
be in order, and with those in good shape the 
use of them would be a pleasure also as well as 
being effectual. 

Tools used by various persons on a farm will 
soon become dull, rusty and useless, and the 
hand labor required to keep them in order is so 
great that most persons will naturally get tired 
of trying to keep them in order, and for this 
reason shops without convenient motive power 
are likely to be abandon>>d. 

Technical art training is growing rapidly in 
favor throughout the world, for the reason, no 
doubt, that a better knowledge of the mechani- 
cal arts, by persons generally, will assist them 
materially in making a living. 

A man who should receive his education on a 
farm, having grown up thereon from his boy- 
hood, properly surrounded with books, machin- 
ery and material, with a constant practice upon 
work that is necessary and useful, and having a 
real current value when done, would be more 
likely to turn out a complete mechanic than 
one who simply went through the forms of a 
technical school practice, wherein the article 
produced would have no practical value. 



Technical art schools in mechanics would be 
very useful, and so is professional bookkeeping; 
but the scholar knows but little about real 
bookkeeping until he has had considerable 
practice in bookkeeping, connected with a real 
business house; and while I would not discour- 
age technical schools for those not on farms, I 
certainly would prefer to educate the farmer's 
boy at home, in preference to sending him away 
from the farm to a city school, unless it would 
be for a short time only. 

It is no credit to modern civilization that so 
large a proportion of the young men of our day 
should be so utterly unfit to battle with the 
world for a livelihood. There are no doubt 
millions of men in middle life now dependent 
upon the axe and shovel alone for a living, and 
yet seem contented with their lot so long as they 
can get such employment. " Their ignorance is 
bliss," but how can parents feel a pride in such 
sons? It is better to dig and shovel the earth 
than do nothing, but the man who has no 
higher ambition cannot claim to be of much im- 
portance or value in his citizenship. 

I admit that a division of labor and the 
establishment of large factories for the manu- 
facture of specialties in the farmer's line can do 
the work much cheaper than the farmer can 
himself, provided their time is valued equally; 
but when the farmer's time is valueless because 
he cannot utilize it all on his farm, then the 
farmer certainly has the advantage. But it is 
not altogether a question of present economy, 
by any means, as the constant employment on 
the farm of the whole family is conducive to 
habits of industry and good morals, and with- 
out these qualities the farmer's life would be a 
failure. 

Artisan labor quickens intellectual ability in 
all directions, and will relieve the monotony of 
farm life to a degree that will make it interest- 
ing, simply by the exercise of a more intelli- 
gent brain. With the dull work, and in the 
interest of humanity, it is important that the 
rising generation should be taught to use their 
brains as well as hands. R. G. S.veath. 

Jeraey Farm, San Bruno, Dec. SO, 18S6. 



Hillside and Valley. 

Editor-s Press: — It is a great but very com- 
mon mistake with many farmers on high and 
dry land to allow their crops to grow too thick. 
The blades or plants rob each other and all 
fail. Plant your crops at " magnificent dis- 
tances," as is said of Washington City. Don't 
try to shade the ground; leave plenty of room 
to harrow and cultivate. Good seed is neces- 
sary for good crops, yet with poor conditions 
and cultivation, it is no better than poor seed. 

Owners of poor, high land often wish for a 
fertile, moist valley. Now the true value of 
any and all kinds of produce should be deter- 
mined by its nutritive qualities, or the amount 
it takes to support and improve animal life. 
Upon moving into the valley, I found by care- 
ful observation that mv horse consumed over 
one-third more hay. Beets, tomatoes, etc., 
grew large and fine-looking, but lacked that 
rich, nutritive quality of higher land. It is not 
easy to compare the cereal crops, but probably 
the same differences exist. This may seem 
strange to some who always thought that wheat 
was wheat. 

It would seem these considerations ought to 
reconcile the owner of the most high and bar- 
ren land. But there is one point of far greater 
importance than these — the superior intellect- 
ual and moral progress attained by the use of 
higher and more refined food. 

By means of fossil remains in different 
strata we trace back in geologic history 
(which, by the way is far more reliable than 
ancient written history) to the time of a 
swampy, steaming, fertile earth with a rank, 
coarse growth of vegetation, but no refined, nu- 
tritious or condensed seeds, grain or fruit. All 
animal life was then low, gross, reptilian or- 
ganizations, with no active, high, intelligent 
forms. As the land became elevated through 
the lapse of ages, higher forms of vegetation 
were evolved. Then higher and more intelli- 
gent beings, including man, kept advancing with 
the more refined foods. 

I heard a man the other day inquiring for 
cheat or chess for seed to sow on bis low, wet 
land. This man will probably feed his cows, 
pigs and hens on cheat, and his family will 
eat the milk, eggs and pork. After awhile, 
when his children are going to school, he will 
wonder why they are not among the best and at 
the head of their classes. It is unfortunate for 
the progress of the human race that the com- 
merce of the world requires the cities with 
dense population at low altitudes for the con- 
venience of navigation. 

Drainage, undoubtedly, taken in a wide 
view, is of far more importance than irrigation. 
There are, of course, difficulties to overcome; 
tiles sometimes clog and ditches fill in and are 
troublesome to cross. A very cheap, simple 
plan is to leave the dead furrow in the lowest 
place every year, and the ridge or double fur- 
row nearer or farther away on either side, as 
may be necessary for a gradual slope. From 
my experience and deductions from science it 
is evident that drainage, in connection with 
railroads, is the most powerful lever to elevate 
the human race. Since writing the above I 
was greatly pleased to read your vigorous arti- 
cle last week on drainage, the importance of 
which it seems hard to make men realize. 

C. P. SOKANTON. 

Lower Lake, Lake Co., Dec. SOlfi, 



Vaca and Adjacent Valleys. 

Editors Press : — Thinking perhaps a short 
description of Vaca valley and the valleys ad- 
joining it would be interesting to many of your 
numerous readers, I will give it the best I can. 

Vacaville lies on the Vaoaville & Clear 
Lake railroad, five miles from Elmira, which is 
50 miles north of San Francisco. Vaca valley 
lies to the west and north of Vacaville, is from 
one to three miles wide, and about six miles 
long, and contains abont 6000 acres, the 
most of which is set out to orchards and vine- 
yards. It is bounded on the east and west by 
ranges of hills and mountains, a large part of 
which is cultivated. 

Pleasant valley lies north of Vaca valley, 
and contains some of the finest orchards in So- 
lano county. The Pioneer or Miller ranch, 
Thurber, Pleasants, Brink and Thiijsell ranches 
contain each from 200 to 400 acres of orchard 
and vineyard, and have for many years raised 
the first fruit that goes to San Francisco or is 
sent East, cherries excepted. 

Putab Creek lies two miles further north and 
sends the earliest vegetables and canteloupes to 
the San Francisco market. South of Vaca 
valley lies Lagoon valley, which contains abont 
3000 acres, and probably 800 acres of orchard 
and vineyard. West of Lagoon (valley lies a 
small valley where are the famous Bassford 
cherry orchards. The Bassfords have about 
300 acres in trees and vines, about half of which 
is in cherry trees ; the balance is in peaches, 
ngs, pears, apricots, oranges and vines. 

Apples are not generally regarded as a success 
in these valleys, except early varieties, of 
which enough are raised on the Miller ranch to 
supply the San Francisco market while they 
last. H. Bassford shipped some red Astrachans 
East last summer which brought good prices. 

The water is generally good, and is found by 
boring from 10 to 35 feet. Oak wood is plenty 
at from three to six dollars per cord. There is 
almost any kind of soil that a man could want 
for trees or vines, but generally in the valleys 
it is a loamy, made soil, from 5 to 20 feet deep. 
Some of it is very wet in winter, but it can be 
drained. A good many tiles have been put in 
this fall. It is thought by many that the wet, 
heavy soil is the best for pears, but it takes 
them two or three years longer to bear. 

Vines used to be put out 6 and 8 feet apart, 
but now the right distance is thought to be 10 
and 12. Trees are set out 16x18 and 20 feet 
apart. Some put vines between the trees, but 
I think that is much like the man riding the 
horse and carrying the bag of meal on his shoul- 
der to lighten the load for the animal. 

The varieties of early grapes are Black .Tune, 
Fontaine bleau, White Chasselas and Madeline; 
then come Tokay, Muscat and Rose of Peru, 
with Cornichon and Emperor to wind up on. 
There are many other kinds of grapes raised 
here, but these are the main kinds. Not many 
raisins are made here, but a good many wine 
grapes are raised which bring good prices. 

The principal pears are Bartlett and Winter 
Nelis. Bartlett pears, from some cause, prob- 
ably on account of heat which stops the flow of 
sap, when from one-half to two-thirds grown, 
stop growing, and then come in after the pears 
from the Sacramento river and Suisun valley. 
[It is more probably owing to moisture condi- 
tions in the soil. — Eds.' Press.] Peaches and 
apricots, however, ripen here before they do in 
other places. By coming in late the pears are 
much more valuable to ship Eist. 

Berries have not been tried here very exten- 
sively, but are not likely to prove profitable to 
raise. Good judges say that not more than one- 
tenth of the fruit belt of California will raise 
good peaches, and not one-fourth of that will 
raise pe.iches like Vaca and Pleasant valleys. 
This is proved by the fact that the canners will 
always pay from one-half to two cents per 
pound more for peaches and apricots from here 
than from any other part of the State. The 
Benicia cannery made a contract, a few weeks 
since, for a large part of their fruit for the next 
five years in Vacaville. Mr. Groom, of Napa, 
was here last week trying to make the same 
kind of contract. 

There is more rainfall in Vaca valley than 
north or south of there. The climate is gener- 
ally pleasant. There is seldom enough fog here 
to hide the sun. Almost all kinds of trees that 
arc raised in the State do well here, including 
oranges, lemons, persimmons and olives. 

It must not be thought that it is all profit 
and pleasure raising fruit here. Last year 
many trees died from some unknown cause. 
There are some vineyards in which the phyl- 
loxera has a very large hold, and we have quite 
a sprinkling of scale bugs and other fruit pests 
which the owners of orchards are fighting the 
best they know how. 

There are three driers in the vicinity of Vaca- 
ville and several small canneries. J. Gates bus 
one witS which he can put ur> from SO to 100 
dozen per day. Messrs. Bassford, Blake, 
Pleasants and Thissell have each a cannery. 

Land set oat to trees and vines is worth from 
§100 to $600 per acre. Many of the farms con- 
tain only from 15 to .30 acres; some from 200 
to 400, but not many are large farms. Help is 
always plenty, except once in awhile in fruit- 
picking time. The greatest drawback here is 
the employment of Chinese. Some prefer 
white labor and will hire no other. Probably 
the labor question will be righted in time. 
The wages paid are from $1.50 to $2 per day, or 
§50 and $60 per month, a man boarding himself, 
or $1 per day and $25 to $30 per month. G. 



Distribution of Seeds and Plants. 

University Experiment Station, Bulletin 
No. Bl- 
owing to the lateness of the season it is 
deemed advisable to combine this 'year the dis- 
tribution of seeds and that of plants, which 
have for the last two years been made by sepa- 
rate announcements. We'^have retained in the 
lists some growths which have done well on the 
University Experimental Grounds, and have 
been given good reports by those to whom we 
have sent them for trial, in order that the ex- 
periments might be still more widely extended 
to secure a wider knowledge of the adaptation of 
the plants to California conditions. A number 
of new growths are offered this year which have 
set up a claim to value in this State. As has 
been described in previous bulletins, this distri- 
bution is made for the purpose of ascertaining 
the adaptation and practical value of the several 
kinds, in the different climates and soils of the 
State; and persons receiving them are requested 
to report results, whether success or failure, 
and if the latter, from what apparent causes. 

Terms. — As there is no appropriation avail- 
able to meet the expenses of packing and 
postage, applicants are requested to send the 
amounts specified in connection with each de- 
scription below. If they desire 'seeds sent by 
express, applicants need not send the amounts 
specified for postage, but all orders for geed-< by 
express must be accompanied by a remittance 
ot 10 cents to pay for packing. Applications 
may be made for one or more kinds of seeds. 
In case any kind of seed becomes exhausted, 
the money sent will be returned unless a second 
choice is mentioned by the sender. 

Plants will be forwarded by express (unless 
specially otherwise requested), in lots consist- 
ing of the number hereinafter mentioned for 
each kind, on remittance of 25 cents for ea;h 
lot of plants and 10 cents additional for each 
additional lot to pay expenses of packing, etc. 
Postal notes, payable at the Berkeley postoiiice, 
are requested to be sent in lieu of stamps when- 
ever practicable. Any surplus left after filling 
orders as far as possible will be returned to the 
senders, deducting letter postage. 

Wheats Resisting the Hessian Ply. 
The distribution of cereals this year is re- 
stricted to three varieties of wheat, which 
proved resistant to the attack of the Hessian 
fly (Ctcidomyia destructor) in our experiments 
during the past season. An outline of these 
experiments was given in Bulletin No. .58 of the 
Uuiversity Experiment Station, and a full re- 
port will be found in the forthcoming report of 
the College of Agriculture for 18S6. Out of 100 
varieties of wheat sown there were but six in 
which no trace of the fly was found, and of 
these we have sufficient seed of three varieties 
for distribution. It is desired to send these 
wheats only to the localities where the fly is 
known to exist, because we want the experi- 
ence of experimenters in other infested locali- 
ties to compare with our own observations. 
The varieties offered are "Volo," "Bearded 
Mi8soyen"and "Greek Atlanti." These wheats 
all have solid stems, the straw being filled with 
pith. They all belong to the hard wheat type 
( 2V(7(Cum (Zurum), having rather long pointed 
grains, almost translucent, and a horny con- 
sistency, owing to their richness in gluten, 
though when grown in this State they rapidly 
change in this respect and become starchy. 
The.ie wheats are chiefly grown in the countries 
bordering upon the Mediterranean and the 
Black seas. They do not succeed in the north 
of Europe, nor are they of much account even 
in the middle of France. They are, however, 
quite hardy and productive in California, and 
with the change n their character noted above, 
promise to be of considerable value. Samples 
of the grain were submitted to experts in mill- 
ing and shipping wheats and pronounced good, 
merchantable wheat, and s^^able in the market 
at about two and one-half cents per cental less 
than No. 1 shipping wheat. As they are nat- 
urally of strong growth and productive, it is 
expected that they will be found valuable in 
those localities where other varieties are ren- 
dered unprofitable because of the Hessian fly. 
Applicants will each be furnished with one 
pound of each of the three varieties, or a single 
pound of either variety. Send 20 cents for 
each pound ordered, if to be sent by mail. 

Textile Plants. 
The progress which inventors seem to be mak- 
ing in devices for extracting the fiber from va- 
rious textile plants promises to make such 
growths profitable in this State. While we do 
not, of course, guarantee the success of the ma- 
chines which are now becon.ing prominent, nor 
promise that a market is yet open for the sale 
of crops which will yield fiber, we deem the out- 
look favorable enough to warrant general exper- 
iment with the plants to ascertain the adapta- 
bility of certain localities of the State to them, 
so that those who may in the future deem such 
crops worthy their attention may have full data 
of their growth and probable yield. It is prob- 
ably generally understood that the secret of 
profit in these crops lies in the solution of the 
problem of extracting the fiber by mechanical 
means so that the pro<luct may profitably com- 
pete with that produced by the cheap labor of 
Asia and Europe. For ramie fiber there is a 
steady demand by the English manufacturers if 



Jan. 1, 1887.] 



pACIFie I^URAlo PRESS. 



the fiber is extracted to suit their wants. For 
flax fiber, we are assured by local manufactur- 
ers that there will be a demand here for aH the 
properly prepared fiber, as only the lack of the 
material prevents a large local manufacture of 
twines, etc. 

Bamie. — We have grown from imported seed 
a stock of plants of Boehmeria candicans which 
is, however, said by experts to be inferior to the 
Boehmeria lenacmima, although the fiber of the 
candicans is of value in making coarser fabrics. 
The tests of this species will probably serve to 
determine the conditions favorable or otherwise 
for the growth of the other. Most satisfactory 
results have been reported with plants sent to 
growers in the upper San Joaquin valley, and 
experience generally seems to indicate success- 
ful growth of the plant in a great variety of 
soils and climates. Ten small plants will be 
sent to each applicant; 25 cents per lot. 

Fiber Flax. — We have gathered a good quan- 
tity of seed of four European varieties of flax 
(Linum usilatissimum) which are grown on the 
continent especially for their fiber. They 
grow about three times as tall as the variety 
commonly grown in this State for the seed. 
When sown in February in Berkeley, a good 
growth has always been attained without irri- 
gation, and fair results have been secured by 
sowing as late as April. The following varie- 
ties are offered in 1-lb. sacks; 20 cents each if 
forwarded by mail: " White Flowering," from 
France; " Royal," from Germajiy; " Russian," 
from Pskoff; and " Yellow Seeded." 

Esparto Orass. — Stipa lenacissima, the grass 
so extensively used in the Mediterranean coun- 
tries for cordage, baskets, etc., and lately ex- 
ported in large quantities as a material for 
paper-making. It grows naturally on sandy 
beaches, within reach of salt water, but will 
doubtless be found adapted to many saline and 
alkaline lands now unreclaimed or occupied by 
the common tule. It should be thoroughly 
tested in sandy coast lands southward of the 
bay, and in South California. Ten plants to 
each lot; 25c. per lot by express. 

I^ew Zealand Flax, so useful to gardeners 
and vineyardists for the purpose of tying with 
the ribbons into which the leaves readily split, 
and which are exceedingly strong, is again of- 
fered for distribution. Reports received from 
the interior of the State point strongly to the 
conclusion that the plant is unadapted to the 
hot interior valleys. From all coast regions the 
reports are good. Although fond of moisture, 
it is not a marsh plant and will not succeed in a 
swamp. Two plants to the lot; 25c. per lot by 
express. 

Forage Plants. 
The forthcoming report of the College of 
Agriculture for 1886 will contain a detailed 
account of the results attained with a number 
of plants sent out for trial to different parts of 
the State. The following are offered for fur- 
ther trial: 

Schrader's Brome Grass (Bromus Schraderii 
or unioloides): Valued in Australia ae resisting 
drought, and in Texas as giving good feed in 
winter and early spring. We have received re- 
ports from many in this State to whom we sent 
seeds two years ago, declaring the grass a suc- 
cess. It is among the first grasses to start, 
grows vigorously, and matures an abundance 
of heavy seeds almost like oats. Its seed 
stems being two or three feet high, and leafy, 
it can be used for either hay or pasture. Four- 
ounce packages by mail, 5c. each. 

Milium multijiorum: A perennial millet grass, , 
growing about two feet high with seed stems 
two feet higher. It is a plant of slow develop- 
ment, but strong. Owing to the fineness of the 
seed, it should be planted very carefully and 
covered lightly. It should not be pastured the 
first year, as it is easily pulled up by the roots. 
After being well established, if grazed down, 
there is an abundant growth of fine leaves, 
which resist winter frosts to a remarkable de- 
gree. We have had favorable reports frorn the 
plants from different parts of the State, al- 
though some experimenters have complained of 
its failure. This is perhaps owing to the fact 
that it is hard to start, and because the season 
was unfavorable. Two ■ ounce packages by 
mail, 3c. each. 

Japan Clover (Legpedeza s«ria<a),a plant which 
is highly commended for drouth-resisting prop- 
erties in some of the Southern States. We 
have but a small quantity of seed, which will 
be sent in 1-oz. packages; by mail, two 
cents each 

Various Trees. 

Kikar. — We have grown from seed imported 
from India a few hundred plants of the Kikar 
or gum-arabic [Acacia Arahica). This tree is 
reported by the Director of the Department of 
Agriculture, at Cawnpore, India, as " unable 
to withstand frost; will do well on heavy soil, 
and thrives even on gravelly land. The gum 
has commercial value and the wood is used in 
making handles of tools and heavy wagons. 
The trees should be planted 40 feet apart, or 
afterward thinned out to that distance." This 
tree should be tried in the thermal belts and 
milder parts of the State. Lots of five 
trees will be sent to each applicant ; 25 cents 
per lot by express. 

Black Wattle (Acacia decurrena). — Reports 
of trees sent out in previous years are very fa- 
vorable. The black wattle is shown to be fully 
adapted to the coast region of the State from 
San Francisco southward, and even in many in- 
terior points. It promises to be of much value 
for fuel, as well as the source of bark for tan- 
ning. The tree is a rapid grower, and the bark 
is usually stripped in its eighth to tenth year, 
when the tree is 30 to 40 feet high. Does well 



on heavy as well as on light soils, provided they 
are deep. We send seed in two-oz. packages, 
five cents each by mail. A few young trees can 
be furnished in lots of five to each applicant; 25 
cents per lot by express. 

The seed of the black wattle is hard to start, 
and may lie dormant a long period. We insert 
the method which Mr. K. McLennan, foreman of 
the University Agricultural Grounds, finds to 
yield good results with seed of the black 
wftttle and with other hard leguminous seeds, 
like the various species of acacia, the carob, 
locust, etc. : 

Prepare the beds or boxes and fill with nice sandy 
loam. Tie the seeds in a piece of cloth or a little 
bag and put them into a can of boiling water. Ex- 
amine them often, and when they become soft and 
swollen they should be taken out and sown immedi- 
ately, covering the seeds up, if in boxes, one-fourth 
of an inch; in outside beds three-eighths of an inch. 
Care should be taken not to allow the seeds to be- 
come dry during germination. If they are exposed 
to the winter rains, cover lightly with straw; remove 
the straw when they are well sprouted. After the 
seedlings are furnished with the first or second set of 
leaves they should be thinned and transplanted at a 
distance of three inches apart. This gives a chance 
to cut them out separately and leaving a little ball 
of earth to each whenever it is desirable to plant 
them out in their permanent places. 

Oliveg. — We have a small number of olive 
trees of the " Nevadillo," a medium-sized olive 
of oval shape, rivening very early, and the 
Manzanillo, a rather large olive of more 
rounded shape, also of early maturity. These 
varieties were secured through Mr. Pohndorf's 
inportation. We can send one tree of each 
variety to each applicant ; 25 cents for each 
pair by express. 

Guavas. — A limited distribution can also be 
made of three guavas, Psidium pomiferum, 
P. Cattleyanum and P. aromaticum. The first 
named is the " pear-shaped guava " which we 
have sent out before and which is reported as 
doing very well in sheltered places in Southern 
California, and a desirable fruit. The second is 
the more hardy "strawberry guava," and 
which promises to succeed wherever the orange 
thrives. The third is a species from Guiana. 
As the adaptation of the varieties is quite well 
defined we will select according to location of 
applicant; three plants to each 25 cents per lot 
by express. 

Miscellaneous. 

Insect Powder Plants. — As there seems a con- 
tinued desire for small packets of these seeds 
for trial, we still offer Pyrethrum cinerari(e fo- 
lium and P. roseum^ the Dalmatian and Persian 
insect powder plants. The former is the one 
most to be recommended as an insecticide, while 
the latter is quite ornamental, having flowers 
resembling single chrysanthemums, of four or 
five different colors. The seed should be sown 
in boxes in light, porous soil, and kept shaded, 
but in a warm place and moist. Under favor- 
able circumstances the seed will germinate in 
two or three weeks, and the plants, when of 
sufficient size to be handled, should be set out 
like cabbage plants. We can furnish the seed 
in one-oz. packages, two cents. 

Quinoa: Cheiiopodium quinoa. — Of this plant 
we have two varieties, the seed of one from 
Germany and the other from Peru. The seed 
is a common article of food in the high plateau 
and mountain districts of Chile and Peru. Un- 
fortunately it is grievijusly infested by the leaf- 
mining larva of a fly which interferes with its 
prospects in this region at least. We would' 
like to have it tried in other parts of the State 
to determine its growth and value. Seed will 
be sent in two-oz. packages, five cents each by 
mail. 

Bamboos. — A number of varieties of bamboo 
are now attainable in quantities to suit from 
nurserymen and importers. We have a collec- 
tion ot varieties which are growing well in the 
Garden of Economic Plants, but we have only 
the Arundinaria falcata for distribution. 
A few can be furnished single plants of this 
species; 25 cents each by express. 

Kaffir Corn. — A variety of dhoura, or Egypt, 
ian corn, introduced by Dr. J. H. Watkins, of 
Palmetto, Georgia. It differs from the " Egypt- 
ian corn" grown in this State in bearing up- 
right heads and in somewhat different charac- 
teristics of growth, as will be described in the 
forthcoming report of the College of Agricul- 
ture. The grain much resembles the White 
variety grown in this State. The plant has ma- 
tured seed in Berkeley, which the Sorghum fam- 
ily does not usually do; the grain is, however, 
much inferior to that which may be expected in 
the interior of the State. We would like to 
have this variety tried by those who are grow- 
ing Egyptian corn profitably. Seed will be sent 
in 2 oz. packages; 5 cents each by mail. 

A bulletin announcing a distribution of cut- 
ting scions, etc., will be made next week. All 
applications should be addressed to 

E. W. HiLGARD, 

December S3, 1886. Berkeley, Cal. 



PHOToaRAPHiNo Cannon-Balls. — It is well 
known that cannon-balls have been most suc- 
cessfully photographed when on their flight 
from the cannon's mouth, but it seems that quite 
recently such photographs have been obtained, 
many of which show, in a remarkable manner, 
the head of condensed air which precedes the 
shot. It is this head of condensed air which 
makes it almost impossible, even for the most 
skillful rifleman, to hit an egg-shell suspended 
by a lougish thread ; and doubtless it is this 
" head " of condensed air which first wounds 
when an animal is hit by a rifle shot. 



JPOULTRY "^ARD. 

Food for Thonsht on Several Topics. 



J0CRBORieUbTUR.E. 
The French Walnut Varieties. 



Editors Press: — As I go about from place to 
place, I enjoy (sometimes) seeing how others do 
business that are in the same line of work as 
myself. 

Some one might ask the question just here. 
Well, what do you see, and how are people gen- 
erally doing business ? Were I to answer in 
two words for the whole list, they would be 
very poor, but to stop right there would be but 
to cast scandal upon a noble few who are doing 
a grand work in the poultry world, and should 
have credit for it. 

Why is this thus ? Are there good reasons 
for the present condition of things ? I would 
answer no, for in the first place there is no 
overproduction in this country either of fowls 
or eggs; if there was, why is it that there are 
annually shipped into this country millions of 
dozens of eggs and many thousands of pounds of 
dressed poultry ? Poultry and eggs are things 
in the provision line which this country fails 
each year to fill its home demar^d, while in 
almost if not quite every other line they have 
enough and a surplus to export. 

It appears to me that too few of our farmers 
are posted, or, if posted, fail to realize the 
magnitude of this part of the farm, and the re- 
sult in dollars that they might put in their 
pockets year by year were they to give it their 
careful attention. 

Others seem to have chickens about the 
place, but are so careless and shiftless with 
them that it is a wonder that they have chickens 
left to their names. Don't think for a moment 
that it pays any better dividends in the poultry 
business than any other to be shiftless and care- 
less, for it does require good judgment, thrift, 
good stock, care and a moderate capital to meet 
with success. 

Now let me tell a secret of the business, and 
I know it will prove itself by trying. Commence 
with full-blooded stock, or if already in busi- 
ness, with mongrel stock, then get rid of them 
as soon as possible, and stock up with full- 
bloods, for in poultry, as v/ith beef or milk 
cov,"s, horses, or sheep, the full-blooded stock is 
far more profitable than the scrub, and it costs 
no more, and oftentimes less, to keep the full- 
blood than the scrub, and a man will take a 
vast arhount of pride and good solid pleasure in 
a flock of full-blooded hens, while he will feel 
that scrub stock is of no account. I have tried 
both and know just how it works. 

I find that some folks think that scrub stock 
half cared for, or not cared for at all, will fill 
the egg basket, and because they don't, out 
they go from the chicken business, with no 
good opinion of it and many hard words against 
it. Well ! no wonder: what business would be 
a success in their hands under the same treat- 
ment ? 

I think too many have the idea that it is a 
business that can be picked up by any one on 
short notice, and run on a large or small scale, 
according to taste; that there 18 little or noth- 
ing to learn, and that there is a mint of money 
in it. Well, there is a mint of money in it, sure, 
but he who would get the money must either 
drive or hold the plow, in other words, com- 
mence with a few fowls and learn the business, 
and advance in numbers as you learn the care 
required for them, and by all means do not be 
afraid to take off the coat and work among the 
fowls. 

> Don't be afraid to feed your own mind in re- 
gard to all matters relating to the poultry yard. 
Much can well be learned by practical work in 
the yard, ^nd great help can be found among 
the many poultry papers and books of the 
present day. Of the latter, " Poultry Culture," 
by I. K. Felch, is a book costing $1.50 and is as 
well worth the money as any book I know of, 
as it covers about the whole field, and is writ- 
ten by a man who has a fine reputation as a 
breeder, and has over 30 years' experience. 
There are other books at less price and cover- 
ing less ground, and on special subjects, in price 
from 25 cents to $12. 

As to papers, aside from the RaRAL Press, 
there are many, and can be had from 50 cents 
to .$1.50 per year. Perhaps the best cheap paper 
is the Poultry Keeper, of Parkesburg, Pa., 50 
cents a year; it comes monthly and is full of 
life and information, and has about 100,000 
readers, which speaks well for it. There are 
others of merit, but they cost %\ or more a year. 

Now I am not advertising this book and 
paper, but am just speaking a word for what I 
believe to be honest worth, and to help those 
who are in search of honest, reliable informa- 
tion. 

Don't expect to be an expert in the poultry 
business at once, it will take time, but there is 
reason to believe you can be if you try. 

As I look back over the years I have been in 
the business, I can see a marked advance for 
the better; a better quality of stock is wanted 
and more of it; breeders who have good stock 
and deal square have plenty of business; the 
signs of the times are good. Cleanliness, watch- 
fulness and care are magic words, and speak 
much for success in the poultry world, and he 
or she who cannot apply them had better stay 
forever out of the business. 

"Read, see and think," "live and learn," 
are mottoes worth following. Strive for the 
top round of the ladder. E. C. Clapp. 

South Pasadena, Cal. 



Editors Press:— I wish to add something to 
corroborate the statements made by Mr. Felix 
Gillet in the Rural Press in regard to the 
French walnuts; they have proved so satisfac- 
tory on my place that I feel bound to recom- 
mend them to all who wish to plant nut j^lrees, 
either for home use or for crop. ^ 

After growing the Los Angeles seedlings for 
many years without any remuneration for my 
trouble, and having the French varieties prove 
so fertile, I feel that the problem is solved and 
that only the latter should be planted in the 
northern portion of the State. 

A history of my French varieties may be in- 
structive. They were imported from Fransom 
Bros., Orleans, France, in 1874. I received a 
few dozen grafted trees of the following kinds : 
the Prajparturiens, A Bijou, and Serrotina; 
afterward the Mayette and Cheberte. They 
have all fruited, and I am able to judge of their 
value. The Prteparturiens was, of course, the 
first to have fruit, and there are in our county 
several trees, grown from seed that was pro- 
duced on my place, that have borne crops of 
nice, well flavored nuts; they were exhibited at 
a meeting of the Hoiticultural Society last fa?l 
and pronounced excellent. 

The A Bijou is a large nut, the largest known; 
it produces a moderate crop of well-flavored 
nuts. The Serrotina is late in coming out in the 
spring, and will be valuable for that reason ; it 
is an abundant bearer. The Cheberte and 
Mayette are both valuable to grow for their 
nuts. All these kinds have proved to be hardy, 
productive, and well flavored. 

Experience has taught us that the Los Ange- 
les seedling is a very unreliable tree, only giv- 
ing fruit under the most favorable circumstances 
in Northern California; it grows very thrifty 
when young, but does not ripen its wood suffi- 
ciently to withstand the severe winters that we 
sometimes have, and if, by chance, a series of 
mild seasons follow the planting, and the tree 
attain a good size, it is unfruitful, and seldom 
pays for the room it occupies. 

Now, the French varieties are entirely differ- 
ent. They are fertile from the first of their 
life. I have seen a tree of the Prajpartnriens, 
three years old, showing female blossoms, and 
where they can be impregnated by the male 
catkins of older trees they will mature nuts. I 
have gathered nuts from a tree scarcely four 
feet high. Their growth is slow and the wood 
ripens fully. I have never lost an inch of wood 
from any frost that has occurred since they 
were planted, while the Los Angeles trees, near 
them, have been cut to the ground many times. 
As to the quality of the nut, there can be no 
difference of opinion — the French nuts are de- 
cidedly superior, the shell is thinner and the 
meat is very sweet and rich, with none of the 
bitter skin which always accompanies the Los 
Angeles kind. 

To those who are planting a home orchard I 
would say plant at least a half of a dozen of 
these early-bearing nuts for the children. 
Nothing will pay better. 

To those who have a deep, rich, moist soil, 
and wish to plant for profit, I would recom- 
mend these nuts. They are not hard to grow, 
the crop is easily gathered, and, if properly 
planted and attended, will pay well. It is a 
mistake to think that they are difficult to trans- 
plant. They do not have the long tap root of 
the native walnut, but will transplant nearly as 
well as an apple tree. 

My trees have not suffered from any insect 
pest; they are remarkably free from them in 
the midst of an orchard of prunes, abounding 
with red spider, aphis and scale. The only 
thing which has given ine any anxiety is the 
tendency of the leaves to scald or sunburn dur- 
ing the hot spells which sometimes occur in the 
summer. They would not be apt to be affected 
in this manner if the soil was more moist. 

There is no reason why Northern California 
should not be a large producer of walnuts. 
They would be especially at home in the coast 
counties; there are thousands of acres in Men- 
docino, Humboldt, Sonoma and Santa Cruz 
counties, that now produce but little income, 
which are especially adapted to their culture. 
These trees can be procured from all the lead- 
ing nurserymen of the State, and I hope plant- 
ers will not neglect them the coming season. 
They are no experiment, as I have had favor- 
able reports from trees in many parts of the 
State, from Red Bluff to San Dieeo. 

Stockton, Cal. . W. B. West. 

[We are glad to have Mr. West's statement 
about the walnuts. We saw the collection for 
which he was awarded a premium at the Citrus 
Fair, and shared in the general admiration of 
it. — Eds. Pres.s.] 

Life and Death. — At a late meeting of Ger- 
man naturalists and physicians. Prof. Cohn, of 
Breslau, read a paper on " Questions of Life" 
which showed that the great problem is not yet 
solved, and that in the living organism there 
are forces which, though they must be mechan- 
ical, as they put bodies in motion, yet cannot 
be split up into components of atomic molec- 
ular forces. " The "gulf which separates life 
from death, organic from inorganic bodies, is 
not closed, and none of our hypotheses will help 
us to bridge this gulf." 



4 



pAClFie I^URAb PRESS, 



[Jan. 1, 1887 



JpATf^ONS OF J^USB/VNDRY. 



Correspondence on Graiice priiiciplca and work and re- 
ports of transai-tiona o( sulxirdinato Granges aro respect- 
fully solicited for this dei^artmcnt. 



Government Telegraphy. 

With each meeting of Congress there is a re- 
vival of interest in the scheme for transmitting 
telegraphic messages under the supervision of 
the (I'OTernment. The discussion is not so 
general and earnest this winter as the impor- 
tance of the question demands. Still, enough is 
said to show that a great deal of interest is felt 
in the suljject by the people at large. 

Our attention has been called to a paper con- 
tributed to the Xorth American Ilevierv two 
years ago by Dr. Norvin Green, President of 
the Western Union Telegraph Company, pre- 
senting arguments to show why the Govern- 
ment should not control the telegraph system 
of the country. His argument, stated as briefly 
as possible, is: That the Constitution gives the 
Government no power to construct and operate 
telegraph lines; that if it be assumed that the 
Government has such power, then in all fair 
dealing the Government is bound to purchase 
the present lines. Not to do so would be a 
violation of good faith and an unwarrantable 
interference with private and corporate rights. 
That the companies now engaged in the busi- 
ness hold all the patents for talegraphic instru- 
ments, and the Government could not equip 
new lines. That if the Government proposes to 
set up in the telegraph business there is no 
other alternative than to buy out the present 
lines and their various patents at a fair valu- 
ation. 

But this is a plausible misstatement of the 
case. It is not contended that the Government 
should go into the general telegraph business, 
but merely have in possession a system of lines 
in connection with the postal service of the 
country. In this respect there could be no 
question as to the constitutionality of the meas- 
ure. It is one of the powers expressly conceded 
to Congress by that instrument. This could 
not be construed as an unwarrantable inter- 
ference with private rights any more than the 
present system of third-class mailable matter 
can be construed as an encro.achnient upon the 
express companies. The monopoly of telegraph 
patents is a sheer bugbear. New companies 
find L<o trouble in that direction. The great 
Mackey-Rennett lines have been partly built 
and equipped since the above article was writ- 
ten. The desirability and practicability of such 
a postal telegraphy is demonstrated by the ex- 
ample of Great Britain, Germany, France and 
Austria. In commenting on this subject, I'rof. 
<}. G. Hubbard, of Cambridge, Mass, a statisti- 
cian of high ability, in the North American He- 
view says : 

Congress could create a postal system, using 
the present postoffices and delivery system, 
either constructing its own lines or contracting 
with parties to furnish all necessary lines for 
transmitting telegrams, the contractors receiv- 
ing the rates fixed by Congress in full compen- 
sation for constructing, maintaining and operat- 
ing the lines, the postoffice furnishing such ad- 
ditional facilities as might be required for the 
purpose of transmitting, at low rates and with 
greater economy, business of a less urgent nature 
than that nowsent over the Western Union lines. 
The Western Union would continue to perform 
a large part of the commercial business, on ac- 
count of greater dispatch, and the business of 
the railroads. It would be inexpedient to adopt 
a low and uniform rate at once, as it would in- 
crease the business beyond the ability of the 
postal department or of any company to handle it, 
I believe that a uniform night rate of 30 cents 
between all offices, and a day rate of 25 cents 
between ofiBces east of the Mississippi and of- 
fices west of that river and east of the Rocky 
mountains, and a rate not exceeding 50 cents 
between any two oirices in different sections, 
would give the people what they need, and 
make the postal telegraph self-supporting. 
There are now at least 50,000,000 messages 
transmitted yearly by existing companies, re- 
quiring not less than 150,0(K) miles of pole 
lines. In six years, at the ordinary rate of in- 
crease, 100,000,000 messages will be transmitted. 
If a postal system with low rates should be in- 
augurated, the number would be increased to 
150,000,000 messages, which would give business 
enough for all the lines and employes of the 
Western Union and the postal system. 



At the recent harvest feast of the Grange in 
.San Jose, which appears to have gone off right 
merrily, Bro. I. A^ Wilcox, Assemblyman-elect, 
spoke at considerable length on the reduction 
of the railroad rates on fruit shipments East. 
In closing, he said: " In my experience with 
ttie railroad officials, I have found them always 
willing to listen to reason. They realize that 
their interests are identical with those of the 
people, and in these matters it is a wise policy 
to confer with them and folly to antagonize 
them." The remarks of Mr. Wilcox were 
listened to with attention, and at the close 
were heartily applauded. 



Kntf.ri'kisk (iKANi;E. — In the list of'ofticers- 
elect of this Grange, as publishbd last week, 
the name of Thomas Waite, the retiring Chap- 
lain, was inserted by mistake. The former 
Secretary, Mrs. M. L. Plummer, desires to have 
this correction noted. 



Grange Elections.* 

American River Grange.— Dec. 11: D. W. 
Taylor, M.; J. E. Beach, 0.; M. Pike. Sr., L.; 
A. A. Harris, S.; M. Pike, Jr., A. S.; W. H. 
Giffen, C; M. Lauredson, T.; J. C. Cornell, 
Stc; J. C. Brewster, G. K.; Mary Cornell, 
Ceres; Mary Cox, P.; Martha Criswell, ¥.; Etta 
Cornell, L. A. S.; Alaggie Cox, Org.; J.Cor- 
nell, Sr., Trustee. 

Ceres Grange.— Dec. 24: Vital E. Bjngs, 
M.; M.J.Hall, 0.; Sister H. M. Whitmore, 
L.; P. P. Stiles, S.; H. W. Brouse, A. S.; Sis- 
ter A. Chapin, C; M. M. Hall, T.; R. K. 
Whitmore, Sec; Maria Lewis, (i. K.; Nettie 
Brouse, P.; Susie iUngs, F.; Alice Whitmore, 
Ceres; Sarah Whitney, L. A. S.; Mary Will- 
iams, Org. 

Elk Grove Grange. — Thomas McConnell, 
M.; Geo. S. Williamson, O. ; James Caplea, L ; 
W. J. Bader, S ; John Winkelman, A. S.; 
Gillis Doty, C; Geo. T. Carr, T.; Delos Gage, 
Sec; L. Shelmeyer, G. K.; Anna McConnell, 
Ceres; Mrs. Mary Kerr, P.; Mrs. S. Stelter, F.; 
Mary Chalmers, L. A. S.; E. W. Stickney, 
Trustee. 

Snellino Grange (reorganized). — Installed: 
Geo. P. Kelsey, M.; John Ivett, 0.; Geo. W. 
Thomason, T.; S. K. Spears, Sec; Mrs. Sasan 
Fowler, L. 

Washington Grange. — Dec. IS: Samuel C. 
Waters, M. ; R. S. Pardee, 0. ; Sister Bly ther, 
L.; James Ritchie, S. ; Chas. Child, A. S.; Sis- 
ter Pardee, C; J. C. Blyther, T.; "Chas. Bam- 
ert. Sec; H. C. Little, G. K.; Minerva Hoi 
man. P.; H. C. Little, G. K.; Silvie Northrup, 
F.; Amy Mclntyre, Ceres; Sister Bamert, L. 
A. S. 

Watson viLLE Grange. — N. A. Uren, M.; 
Sister E. Z. iloache, O.; Sister M. E. Tuttle, 
L.; A. Cox, S.; D. Tuttle, A. S.; Sister Hick- 
man, C; W. R. Speegle, T.; Sister S. J. Kid- 
der, Sec; J. F. Freels, G. K.; Josie Roache, 
P.; Nan Tuttle, F.; Sister Uren, Cores; Ana- 
bel Tuttle, L. A. S.; Sister Roadhouse, Org.; 
0. Tuttle, Trustee. 

West San Joaquin Grange. — Dec. 19 : 
Alanson P. Stocking, M.; Jno. M. Kerlinger, 
O.; Wm. G. McKean,L.; Rufus Saddlemire, S. ; 
Jas. L. Williams, A. S. ; Mrs. J. M. Kerlinger, 
C; Jas. Field, T.; Jas. C. Allen, Sec; Wash- 
ington Haynes, G. K.; Mrs. R. Saddlemire, 
Ceres; Mrs. J. G. Dean, P.; Mrs. A. P. Stock- 
ing, F.; Mrs. J. L. Williams, L. A. S.; W. 
Haynes, Trustee for three years. 

Yuba City Grange.— Dec 18 : C. E. Will- 
iams, M.; C. C. Newkom, O.; Mrs. M. C. 
Smith, L.;N. Nelson, S.; A. S. Barr, A. S.; 
Mrs. S. E. Walton, C; E. S. Wadsworth, T.; 
Geo. Ohlever, Jr., Sec; E. C. Frisbie, G. 
K.; P. E. Newkom, P.; Mrs. Carrie Barr, F. ; 
Nettie McCready, Ceres; H. S. Jones, L. A. 8.; 
F. Cooper, Trustee; W. D. Woodworth, Org. 

•Secretaries, or other officers, arc invited to send us 
lists of utficers elected, date of installations, aud all 
other interesting matter for publication. 



Installations Coming. 

Within the next few weeks many Granges 
will install their othcers-elect for the coming 
year. These ceremonies are often, and should be 
universally, made the occasion of gladsome social 
reunions. They should be well attended and 
by earnest endeavors made of lasting advantage 
to the Order. We notice the following an- 
nouncements : 

To Install Saturday, Jan. let. 

]>8nnett Valley, 10 a. m. 

Sebastopol, " " 

Watson ville, " " 

Wheatland, " " 

Saturday, Jan. 8th. 
Eden &Temescal (joint) at Hay wards, 10 a. m. 
Magnolia. 

Sicramento & Sacramento Co. Pomona (joint) 
at Sacramento, 11 A. M. (VV. M., Johnston to 
officiate as installing otficer.) 

Santa Rosa, 1:30 P. M. 

South Sutter. 

Stockton, 10 A. M. 

Yuba City. 

Saturday, January l&th. 

Alhambra, 10 a, m. 

Danville. 

There are others, doubtless, of which we have 
not been advised ; and we would thank friends 
and Patrons in all quarters to send us word of 
any such good occasions, whether in joyous 
anticipation or pleasing retrospect. 

Several of the Granges above named have 
issued a general invitation and assurance of 
welcome to all Patrons in good and regular 
standing ; and those who have not done so 
formally are, we feel confident, doing so silently 
in the spirit of fraternal hospitality. Let all 
who can attend such a gathering feel them- 
selves cordially bidden. 



A Grange Called For. — It strikes the Her- 
ald that a Grange, where farmers aud others 
interested in tilling the soil could hold regular 
meetings and discuss the various branches of 
business, would be a good thing in Livermore. 



WhkaTi.anu Grange ha.s invited the officers 
and members of Yuba City Orange to visit them 
on New Vear's day, to witness their installation 
ceremonies and partake with them of a Grange 
dinner in their hall. 



Grange Work and Progress. 

(Prepared Weekly by M. Wuitkhbad, National Lecturer.) 

For many years agriculture has been compelled 
to contribute largely to favored interests without an 
equivalent return ; farmers are paying taxes for oth- 
ers better able to pay them than they. By the oper- 
ations of pools and schemes favored with monop- 
olies he is legally " sheared" of the products of the 
soil. Agriculture pays much the largest share of 
public indebtedness, local and national, and after 
meeting the numerous demands upon it there is fre- 
quently no profit left as interest on the investment, 
often not even paying for the labor. The remedy is 
a thorough organization by farmers. 

The first lesson a candidate learns as he enters a 
Grange meeting for the first time, is, " An honest 
man is the noblest work of God." \Vc need honest 
men in these days, and we need them badly. A 
constantly growing procession is on the road to Can- 
ada. Will not the teachings of the Grange at least 
help — not alone as a prevention, but as a cure? 

The regular annual meeting of the Colorado 
State Grange commences on the second Tuesday in 
January. The State Granges of New York and Illi- 
nois commence on the third Tuesday of the same 
month. 

At the meeting of the (Connecticut State Grange 
at Hartford this month, the morning and afternoon 
sessions of the second d.ay were open to the public, 
and a well-arranged programme was carried out, led 
off by the Lecturer, J. \i. Olcott. Each Grange in 
the State contributed somethmg, either in the way of 
a short address or carefully prepared paper, and all 
interspersed with music and songs. A portion of 
the third day's session was devoted to a discussion 
of the tariff as it relates to the farmers of Con- 
necticut, with good talkers on both sides to speak as 
invited guests. 

"The indifference of those engaged in agriculture, 
and the other industrial pursuits, to matters of legis- 
lation and public affairs, has, in other times and in 
other countries, been the primary cause of class leg- 
islation, which has degraded labor and robbed it of 
its just rewards, and built up a moneyed aristocracy 
and monopolies which own and control not only the 
wealth of the country, but the Government itself. 
Such a condition of affairs can only be averted in 
this country by educating the wealth-producing 
classes to understand their privileges, and in the full 
exercise of their political rights to demand a fairer 
representation in the legislative departments of the 
Government and equal protection to their interests. 
In this great work of educating and elevating the 
agricultural classes of the country, and to save them 
from the impending fate that has befallen the >igri- 
culturist of the Old World, was our Order created." 
— y. y. Woodman, Michigan, Past Master of the 
National Grange. 

Question for discussion by a subordinate Grange, 
"What are the causes of the hard times to the farm- 
er, and how can he best meet them ? " 

The hall of I..ebanon Grange, Connecticut, is a 
handsome building 40x60 feet, occupying the finest 
site in the town, contains upon the first floor a 
library and reading-room, with quite a collection of 
valuable books, and in the rear of this a large and 
convenient store-room. The second floor is occu- 
pied by the hall and .mte-rooms, all finished in 
hard wood, with inside blinds of the same material. 
The hall will comfortably seat 400 persons. I his 
Grange has nearly 200 members. 

C. L. Whitney, of Michigan, has been lately doing 
some effective Grange work in Nebraska, orRanizing 
new tiranges and reorganizing old ones, fie is out 
officially, and under the cflrection of the Executive 
Committee of the National Gr.ange.* 

"There is a tide in the affairs of men, which, 
taken at the flood, leads on to fortune." This is 
true of nations aS well as of individuals. • There are 
times in a battle when everything depends on the 
action of the moment. There are times in the life 
of nations when the same is true. The student of 
political science may easily see that we have reached 
a point where almost everything depends on the 
action of the next few years. Some one has said 
that " Five hundred years of time in the process of 
the world's salvation may depend on the next 20 
years of the United States history." There are 
points in history where all lines seem to converge, 
and then from which they seem again to radiate. 
The closing years of the 19th century is such a point, 
and wise and good men, who care to be instru- 
mental in shaping the political destinies of their 
country, can do more in the next few years than can 
be accomplished in centuries later. 

" Let every heart and hand unite 
In the benignant plan. 
The noble purpose, just and right, 
To aid our fellow-man." 



A Farmers' Pork Company. — A correspond- 
ent of the Dixon Tribune urges the farmers of 
Solano county to form a protective association. 
He thinks that the aggressions, exactions and 
oppressions of the San Francisco pork-pack- 
ers render some concerted action upon the 
part of the producers necessary, unless they 
propose to abandon, as unprofitable, this im- 
portant industry. The packers have combined 
for the past three years, and the prices they 
have paid, ranging from two and a half to three 
cents per pound, are ruinous, and will not pay 
the expense of raising pigs to be eight weeks 
old. It will not do to say that the packers 
cannot afford to pay more. The price of bacon, 
hams, etc., gives the lie to such an assertion. 
The farmers can easily protect themselves from 
such imposition. "My remedy," he continues, 
"is to call meetings, form joint-stock com- 
panies, build slaughter and packing bouses — 
say at Rio Vista, Suisun and Collinsville, or 
other convenient points — elect necessary man- 
agers, and procure the services of men who 
thoroughly understand the business of butcher- 



ing and curing meat. In this way we will be 
able to save freight and the inconvenience and 
danger of long shipments, as well as protect 
ourselves against combinations. Such com- 
panies, properly organized and managed, could 
afford to pay farmers five cents per pound for 
hogs, and then double their investment. In 
this way, the money will be kept in circulation 
in the county, and employment may be given 
to many needy and deserving men." 



Manly and Gentlemanly. 

The Grass Valley Tidings speaks in a straight- 
forward, handsome way of the late visit from 
the editor of the Suiter Farmer: 

George Ohleyer came to Grass Valley at the 
invitation of the Grass Valley Grange. When 
here, Mr. Ohleyer was the guest of A. G. Peter- 
son, who is a daily worker in the Idaho mine 
and who is, at the same time, a member of 
Grass \'alley Grange. Mr. Ohleyer was shown 
around town by Alexander Henderson, a mem- 
ber of Grass Valley Grange, and one among the 
most reputable old citizens of the place. Mr. 
Ohleyer visited the Idaho mine and had a long 
conversation with the Messrs. Coleman, and he 
was shown over the mill and works at the Idaho 
by one of the Messrs. Coleman. Mr. Ohleyer 
then went to the Empire mine and looked at 
everything. He did not act in any underhand 
way. He was the guest of gentlemen who do 
not have that sort of acting. There was and is 
no " information " to be obtained at Grass Val- 
ley which can be used in the Legislature or 
anywhere else against mining. All the 
(irass Valley mines will bear the fullest 
scrutiny by any person from any of the val- 
leys. Grass Valley mines invite the fullest 
scrutiny. They will be all the better, safer and 
stronger by having such men as George Ohleyer 
look at them. This is not because Mr. Ohleyer 
is any better or stronger than many other men, 
but because he has great weight in communities 
where he is known. The Tidings is not one of 
the papers that is drumming up lawsnits 
against quartz or any other mining. There- 
fore, when a man like George Ohleyer comes 
this way and looks at our mines, we are glad to 
see him, for he will see a great and beneficial 
industry of which he had no previous proper 
conception. We would like to see Green of the 
Colusa Sun, Short of the Fresno Republican, 
McClatchy of the Sacramento Bee, the Wood- 
land editors, or anybody else from the valley, 
come up here, under their own names, and 
look at our mines. All such visitors will ad- 
vance the mining industry, and many of such 
visitors would not only approve of mining, but 
would also invest in our mines. 



REsoLrilONS OF Respect.— The late Warren 
A. Smith is spoken of, by the committee of 
Placerville Grange, as a brother who was ever 
ready to proffer the hand of aid, and the voice 
of sympathy ; an active member of the Order, 
whose utmost endeavors were for its welfare 
and prosperity ; whose advice and counsel have 
been treasured up, aud whose life was upright, 
noble and one that we might well emulate. 



Snelling Grange has been reorganized by 
the aid of Bro. E. Kelsey, so he writes the 
Patron. A partial list of the officers installed 
appears among our Grange elections. 

Healiisburg <jR.\nge, a correspondent says, 
shows signs of reviving. We hope those signs 
are true forerunners of her return to a life of 
useful and glad activity. 



A Libel on the South. 

George Gary Eggleston writes home to the New 
York Commercial Advertiser from Los .\ngeles that 
the present boom in .Southern California, which has 
blown Los .Angeles into a city of 45,000 inhabitants 
in a few months, has the flimsiest of supports — the 
hope of a steady influx of consumptives from the 
V.-nsX. He believes that that part of the world has a 
fine future, but that it will have to succeed a col- 
lapse. — Springfield Republican. 

That there may be inflation in some direc- 
tions in the south, and that reaction may follow 
to a certain degree, may be possible. In every 
rapid advance there is a chance of temporary 
reaction, though it does not always come. But 
to declare that the prosperity of the south is 
based upon a " hope of a steady influx of con- 
sumptives from the Pjast " is a libel. The true 
statement is that which we quoted from Mr. 
Estee's speech at the Sacramento Citrus Fair, 
and which we reproduce once more to meet the 
false statements above. Mr. Estee said: 
" .Southern California had no boom until that 
lovely country deserved it, and now the world 
knows Southern California by heart. It has 
promised much, but Southern California has 
done all it promised. Look at the carloads of 
oranges and lemons raised there aud sent away 
to market; the wines and brandies that every 
month are sent to the East and Europe for sale; 
the raisins in almost nnlimited quantities that 
it makes, and you will learn the secret of the 
success of Southern California." 



Prof. J. G. Lemmon and wife have pre- 
empted UiO acres of fine grazing and fruit land iu 
Chalame valley, San Luis Obispo county, where 
they intend to make headquarters for botanizing 
next season. Many friends will wish them 
good health and abundant success in their home- 
making undertaking. 



Jan. 1, 1887.] 



f ACIFie F^URAb f RESS. 



5 



CALIFORNIA. 
Alameda. 

Lemon, Guava and Olive. — Livermore Her- 
ald: Chas. A. Wetmore has on his Cresta 
filanca vineyard-ranch a number of lemon trees 
in the fourth year, which are now well set with 
ripening fruit of good size. They have been 
raised without either irrigation or protection, 
on sidehill land. Mr. Wetmore has in nur- 
sery 2000 guava plants which he raised from 
seed, and will put out on his hillsides when 
sufficiently grown. The guava is a tropical 
fruit, but the plants thrive well on Mr. Wet- 
more's place. In fact, these tablelands and 
hills are never" visited by frost, and the lowest 
point touched by a self -registering thermometer 
in his olive orchard last winter was 38 degrees. 
His olive orchard is now in its fifth year. Last 
season he made two quarts of oil, and this sea 
son 60 gallons from 200 trees. He says olives 
bear earlier here than in San Diego county, and 
he believes they will thrive better. Mr. Wet- 
more's place is well worth a visit, and should 
be seen by every one who desires to appreciate 
the resources of Livermore valley. 
Contra Costa, 

Cat, Catamount and Coyote.— Nortonville 
Cor. Concord Sun: Coyotes and wildcats 
are numerous in this desolate camp. Jas. 
Bryant trapped inside of a week four wildcats 
and five coyotes. The county should pay a 
bounty on the killing of one as well as the 
other. It would be. well for the Supervisors to 
attend to this. A California liou was seen near 
McBride's mine, and Wm. N. Jones set a large 
trap with a double chain for his lionship. But 
the noble brute got away with the trap, 

Inyo. 

Sheep Tax Wanted. — Independent: The 
Grand Jury recommend the imposing of an 
annual license on sheep pastured in Inyo 
county during any portion of the year, "as we 
well know that the county suffers materially 
from the grazing of predatory bands of sheep 
owned in other sections of the country, and to 
the great detriment of our citizens." 

Los Angeles. 

Fruit Shipments East. — Santa Ana, Dec. 
25: Up to date 225 cars of oranges, lemons, 
grapes and raisins have been shipped to the 
Eastern markets from this place this season. 
■Oranges are just beginning to come in, and the 
outlook is favorable for a large crop. 

Okanoes. — Anaheim Cor. Los Angeles 
Times, Dec. 22: The shipment of oranges 
is becoming quite brisk. The crop is of unusual 
quality, bright and clean, and the prices real- 
ized thus far give good satisfaction to shippers. 
The crop of several orchards has been sold on 
the trees at $1.50 per box. 

A Cabbage Plantation. — Anaheim Gazette, 
Dec. 25 : Mr. Whitaker has planted on his 
Contra Costa ranch 17 acres of cabbages, and 
they are growing with the rapidity character- 
istic of the soil. A well-known commission 
house of Los Angeles has guaranteed him one 
and a half cents per head, and as there are 8000 
head to the acre the profit promises to be about 
equal to that of semi-tropic fruits. The cab- 
bages will be ready for the thrasher or header 
(we don't know how such things are harvested) 
by March. 

Prunes that Pay. — Pomona Times-Courier: 
James Loney has five acres set to French 
prunes, three and four years old, which 
yield him annually eight tons to the acre. 
In drying they lose about half their weight, 
leaving four tons to the acre. The dried 
fruit sells from seven to eight cents per pound. 
Mr. Loney, however, has been more successful 
than others who have engaged in prune-grow- 
ing, and we hear of no one who has had his 
phenomenal success in prune-growing. 

Merced. 

Fine Field of Wheat. — Merced Argus, Dec. 
25: The large field east of town belonging to 
C. H. Huffman, sowed to wheat on summer- 
fallowed soil, presents the handsomest appear- 
ance of any that we have seen on the plains this 
season. The ground was deeply plowed, har- 
rowed three or four times, then sowed and har- 
rowed in well, rendering the surface perfectly 
smooth and the soil thoroughly pulverized. 
The young wheat is up two or three inches high, 
looking bold, thrifty and as promising as could 
be desired at this time of year. Should the 
season prove favorable we expect to see har- 
vested from it 40 or 50 bushels of prize wheat to 
the acre. Thorough cultivation on Mr. Huff- 
man's farms around Merced in the past 15 years 
has proved universally profitable and demon- 
strated that those who till their farms well will 
reap a rich reward for their labor and the 
money invested. 

San Benito. 

Oranges. — Free Lance, Dec. 24 : B. B. Mc- 
Croskey has in his garden several seedling or- 
ange trees heavily laden with their luscious 
fruit. The soil on which they are grown is the 
ordinary soil of the valley. The trees are 
healthy and of large size. "There are not more 
than 25 orange trees in the valley, but they all 
do well, bear abundantly, and produce fruit of 
the best quality. Who will plant the first or- 
ange grove ? 

Apples. — A. S. Murphy has brought us sam- 
ples of some of the finest apples we have seen in 
California. They were raised in ^the foothills 



of the Lone Tree district. They are large, 
solid, of fine flavor, and entirely free from pests 
of any kind. The codlinmoth, which has made 
such havoc among apple trees in various sec- 
tions, ia here unknown. The cultivation of the 
apple ought to be a most popular and profitable 
industry among our foothill ranches. 

• San Bernardino. 

Malaga Raisins. — Ontario Record: We 
have in our office a box of Malaga raisins grown 
by L. S. Dyar, which to our taste compared 
favorably in color, plumpness and flavor with 
any Ontario Muscats we have seen. The 
Malaga, is certainly a surer-producing grape on 
the foothills than the Muscat; it also gives a 
much higher per cent of layers, and many of 
our fruit-growers are of the opinion that it is 
the coming grape for mesa lands. 

Champion Orange. — Press and Horticultur- 
ist, Dec. 25: Wednesday H. M. Beers brought 
down from Crafton a Washington Navel orange 
which measured 16J inches in circumference and 
weighed 1 pound and 10 ounces. This orange 
so far takes the blue ribbon for size, and if any 
one can beat it we would be glad to have him 
report to this office. 

- San Diego. 
Ostrich Feathers. — Telegram, Dec. 22: 
The first invoice of feathers was received at San 
Diego to-day from the American ostrich farm 
at Fairview, near the Fallbrook R. R. depot. 
The feathers are very fine. Many of them are 
from chicks 15 months old. The prices are 
$3 to $5 each, not cleaned. 

San Joaauln. 
Editors Press: — We are having delightful 
holiday weather so far, although we would all 
prefer, of course, to see clouds and rain. We 
hear much less grumbling because of the long 
delay than usual, and surely, after the bounti- 
ful harvest of the present year, we should take 
cheerfully from the hand of Providence a less 
prosperous season. However, we are still hop- 
ing for abundant rains later; it is not yet too 
late to expect it. As I write, December 28th, 
the wind is blowing and there is fair prospect 
that the new year will be ushered in with a 
storm. — Mrs. J. M. K., Tracy. 

Santa Barbara. 
Editors Press: — We begin to get a little un- 
easy on account of the long delay of the rains. 
It is quite foolish, but I suppose we cannot 
help it. As long as there is plenty of time be- 
fore us for abundant rains, which is the case at 
present, no one should look or feel gloomy. 
We have had sufficient to start the feed, which 
is growing below ground, if not much above, 
and at this moment the prospect for more rain 
is good. Doubtless we shall have sufficient in 
good time. A Happy New Year to all the 
readers of the good, stanch Rural. — S. P. 
Snow, Santa Barbara, Dec. 27, 1886. 

Shasta. 

Artesian Water. — Cottonwood Index, Dec. 
21 : Last week, while boring a well for Andrew 
Johnson southwest of here, Harry Polsley was 
surprised to find the water rising rapidly. It 
rose 70 feet in a few minutes, and is now within 
eight feet of the surface. 

Sonoma. 

Chestnuts. — Democrat, Deo. 25: It was an- 
nounced last week that the first chestnuts 
raised in this section were grown on Mr. Whit- 
aker's ranch in Yulupa valley last fall. This 
was soon contradicted by another gentleman 
who has had trees bearing for two years. Now it 
is leai ned that fine crops of chestnuts have been 
gathered from trees on Kohler and Frohling's 
land near Glen Ellen for four years past. 
These gentlemen also have bearing pomegran- 
ate trees upon their property. 

Tulare. 

A Chance for Cheese-Makers. — Times: Is 
it not strange that in this alfalfa-growing 
county, where cows have the best of milk- 
producing feed, no one has engaged in the 
cheese-making business ? It certainly could be 
made profitable. Stranger still, at certain sea- 
sons butter has to be shipped from S. F. to 
supply this market; and at any time first-class 
butter is hard to obtain. Here are two profit- 
able industries that men of small means might 
engage in. 

Draft Donkeys. — Delta, Dec. 23: H. Bar- 
ton's boys were in town yesterday, with their 
team of .jennies, attracting nearly as much at- 
tention as a circus. The boys brought a cart- 
load of eggs and poultry almost as heavy as the 
diminutive animals which pulled it. They 
make 25 miles a day with their team, while the 
expense of feeding them is but a trifle. 

Mountain Apples. — George Dillon, of the 
north fork of Tule river, brought to town on 
Saturday 1600 pounds of fine apples from his 
orchard. He has 300 trees now four years 
from planting, and has thus far irrigated them. 
The apples are as fine and well-flavored as any 
grown in the cold Eastern States. The orchard 
is at the foot of the pines, about 2600 feet 
above tide level, where frost and snow abound, 
the latter falling six inches deep during heavy 
storms. The orchard thus far has not been mo- 
lested by insect pests, and Mr. Dillon is bound 
to keep it clean if possible. The apples brought 
were contracted at three cents per pound, but 
would have sold readily at four cents, and even 
higher. 

Corn Crop. — Times, Deo. 23: Heretofore 
persons engaged in raising corn in this county 
have given it little care, generally letting it go 
after one plowing and never " suckering " it. 
But this season they have given the crop thor- 



ough cultivation and care, and the result has 
been a yield of from 40 to 60 bushels to the 
acre. J. H. Thomas, just northeast of town, 
harvested over 60 bushels to the acre, all of it 
large fine ears and kernels. W. H. Blain, on 
his ranch two miles east of town, gathered 
about 50 bushels to the acre, and a large crop 
of pumpkins beside. Mr. Thomas, while hav- 
ing 10 bushels to the acre in excess of Mr. 
Blain, says that the latter's crop of pumpkins 
would more than offset his increase, though he 
thinks his corn would bring the best price in 
market, because the pumpkins undoubtedly 
took from the soil the nutriment required to 
fully develop the corn; yet he acknowledges 
that the money value of a crop of corn and 
pumpkins grown on the same ground would ex- 
ceed that of a corn crop only. J. H. Johnson, 
A. I. Weston, Ben Hicks, J. W. Oakes, and 
many others living in what is termed " the 
swamp," have all raised large crops of corn, and 
in all their fields could be found stalks of corn 
14 to 18 feet in length, bearing from two to 
three ears. The great value of these lands lies 
in the fact that corn and vegetables can be 
grown here in any season, whether a wet or 
dry one, and dry seasons are rather preferable, 
as it increases the price of the commodity. 

ARIZONA. 

Grapes. — Phosnix Herald, Dec. 16: Yester- 
day the editor had the pleasure of eating 
a fine dish of ripe Muscat grapes, picked from 
his own vines a day or two previously. Fruit 
was ripe on the same vines July 1st, and since 
that time there have been two additional crops, 
three in all, and all good. Fifty vines, second 
year from cutting, have borne more fruit than 
could be used, and enough canned to last a 
family a whole year, besides what was given 
away. What will happen when the vines are 
five or six years old, or in full bearing, we are 
not ready to predict. 

OREGON. 

Cranberries. — Portland Rural Spirit: There 
are between this city and Salem several tracts 
of land to be seen from the cars that ought to 
be yielding $250 to $400 worth of cranberries 
per acre every year. Men of means seem dis- 
posed to engage extensively in the sheep busi- 
ness. J. H. Sherer, of the Deschutes toll road 
and bridge, has some 14,000 sheep; and Messrs. 
Brayman a"nd Summerville's 15,000 will soon be 
30,000 or 40,000, if rumor is correct. 

WASHINGTON TERRITORY. 

The Palouse Country. — W. M. Lee in 
Tacoma Commerce: The famed Palouse coun- 
try is one of the greatest granaries of the Terri- 
tory. Here great prairies stretch out for 150 
miles, forming one of the richest agricu'tural 
sections of the Northwest. It is dotted with 
substantial buildings, fences, orchards and 
stock, indicating thrift, comfort and growing 
prosperitv of the people. These prairies are 
quite unlike eastern prairies, the land being a 
succession of depressions and knolls. The soil 
on the bights is fully equal to that of the val- 
leys, being largely composed of lava and vol- 
canic ashes, containing ingredients favorable to 
the growth of grain, fruit and bunch grass; in 
short, to diversified farming. With mild and 
healthful climate, clear skies, short winters 
and cheap lands. Eastern Washington seems to 
be one of the most desirable spots for farmers 
to locate comfortable homes. Probably one- 
tenth of the prairie is cultivated, which is capa- 
ble of producing 30 or 40 bushels of wheat 
per acre. 

The salt crop around the Bay of San Fran- 
cisco, for 1886, is about 27,000 tons, being 
about one-third less than the crop of 1885. 
The cause of the shortness of the salt crop of 
this season is accounted for by the salt producers 
in consequence of having so much late rain and 
the smaltness of the tides in the months of May, 
June and July. The tides were so small that 
the salt producers failed to get water into their 
reservoirs. The salt is of as good quality as in 
former years, and perhaps better. No stained 
or discolored salt was manufactured this year. 
The salt season generally begins in the month 
of May and ends in October. 

The tanning industry on this coast is de- 
veloping many new features, and the efforts 
of the manufacturers to improve the quality of 
leather and produce such varieties of material 
as will tend to keep the trade in this line at 
home are particularly noticeable. Fancy leath- 
ers were not produced here to any great ex- 
tent in former years, but at present the whole- 
sale dealers and shoe manufacturers are largely 
supplied with skins which are tanned in this 
city and State. 

Getting Mixed on the Butter Question. — 
A Government inspector at Des Moines re- 
cently placed the Federal tax for oleomargarine 
on a sample of genuine butter which had been 
submitted to hini for inspection. Eight sam- 
ples of butter were submitted, only one of 
which was the pure article, all the others being 
a very good quality of oleomargarine. All the 
latter were passed as genuine and the only gen- 
uine sample was taxed as oleomargarine. 

Mortality Among Sheep. — A Buenos Ayres 
paper says more than 20,000,000 sheep, or 12 
per cent of all the herds in the province, have 
died from disease and exposure, entailing a loss, 
it ia said, of $22,500,000. 



Sonoma County Notes. 

Editors Press : — The greatest of holia 
has come and gone. With it the family reunion, 
the fatted turkey, the happy children and the 
pretty presents have each in turn been in fuM 
possession of the " man of business and 
the lady of the house." Christmas is truly 
the grandest of all holidays. Who would 
wish it otherwise ? That holy day is the one of 
all the year, when farmer, merchant, lawyer, 
banker, doctor, teacher, preacher, mechanic, 
mother, sister and sweetheart, are each willing 
and able to lay away the cares of daily life which 
so much torment them and enjoy the pleasure 
of which they are all other days in the year 
more or less deprived. It is therefore a most 
glorious good thing that Christmas comes at 
least once each year. 

For many years the weather has not been so 
pleasant at this season of the year as it was 
Christmas, 1886. The roads were fine, the day 
was bright, the sun ehone warm, the wild birds 
sang sweetly, the flowers sent their perfume 
everywhere, and verily " December lay in the 
lap of May." How the contrast stands out 
when we think of an Eastern Christmas day I 
Oh, who would not live in California ? As for 
me and mine, give us a home by the shore of 
the restless, health-giving, boundless, beautiful 
Pacific. 

Sonoma county has a long line of sea coast; 
this portion of the county is noted for its fine 
potatoes, excellent butter and unsurpassed tim- 
ber resources. These three items bring a great 
deal of money into our county every year. 

There has been but little rain up to this date; 
the ground is not wet to any great depth, yet 
the farmers have managed to get a good deal of 
plowing done, and it seems to be done well. 
The grain is looking well, owing, no doubt, to 
the fact that in this section heavy fogs have 
been prevailing. 

In many vineyards the work of pruning has 
already begun. Many others will wait till the 
New Year has come, before they will cut away 
the surplus wood, believing that if the new wood 
is cut away too soon the vine is thereby weak- 
ened. There are as many theories about prun- 
ing vines as there are about pruning trees, 
which is one for every orchard and one for 
every vineyard. The proposed railroad from 
Santa Rosa to Benicia seems to be an assured 
fact. 

Already the contract for building the road 
has been let. Messrs. MoBride & Noonan are 
the contractors. They propose to complete the 
road within one year. Santa Rosa will surely 
have a boom. A feeling of joy pervades every 
breast, and everybody hurrahs for the "Santa 
Rosa & Benicia Central Railroad." 

The Santa Rosa Fruit Cannery, which was 
destroyed by fire ^some weeks ago, will be re- 
built in time for the fruit crop of 1887. 

Cherry trees are in blossom. One lone blos- 
som was seen on a pear tree last Sunday, but it 
was certainly out of place. 

Live-stock is doing fairly well. Early lambs 
may be seen skipping here and there as one 
passes the pasture field. 

The wine crop of Sonoma county will not be 
quite as large as it has been estimated, but it 
will be of most excellent quality. 

Coal, in considerable quantities, has been dis- 
covered both north and south of Santa Rosa, 
about 2^ miles each way; which mine will 
prove the better one is the question the respect- 
ive owners are trying to demonstrate. Good 
luck to both is the earnest wish of your 

Occasional. 

Santa Rosa, Dec. S7, 188G. 



A New Grain-Cleaner. 

The policy and practice of the grain-growers 
of the interior valleys in using the combined 
harvesters in gathering their crops has enlisted 
the best efforts of inventors in providing appli- 
ances and additions to perfect and improve 
this system of harvesting. Ashley Bros., of 
Stockton, have built a grain-cleaner and ap- 
plied it to several combined harvesters with 
very satisfactory results. Its chief feature as a 
grain-cleaner is an arrangement of sieves that 
are moved by a quick, jarring motion, and on 
which the grain passes over as it comes from 
the separator cylinder, allowing the small 
seeds to sift through and be gathered into a 
sack. The wind is applied after it passes over 
this sieve and the chaff winnowed from the 
grain. It is claimed that most of the foul seed 
from weeds is thus gathered and saved from 
being scattered on the land. A Rural repre- 
sentative recently witnessed experiments being 
made at the Agricultural Works at Stockton 
with this cleaner, with gratifying results. 
Several farmers and master mechanics who 
were present at this trial gave it a hearty ap- 
proval. It was used on several combined har- 
vesters this season, one of which was owned by 
Mr. Ross Sargeant, of Stockton. Several 
farmers have made arrangements to use this 
grain-cleaner at the coming harvest. Mr. L. 
E. Ashley has also invented a sack-holder that 
is highly praised by those who have used it. 



A large deposit of marble has lately been 
discovered in San Bernardino county, and but 
three miles from the railroad. It covers 600 
acres and has 11 different colors and shades so 
far as yet discovered. It is said to be of the 
finest quality and can be laid down in Los An- 
geles for $1 a cubic foot. It is a remarkable 
find. 



f ACIFie F?.URAId f ress. 



[Jan. 1, 1887 




Farewell to the Old Year! 

the New! 



Hail to 



[Written for the Rural Press by Malub Stafford. ] 

Within the sober silence of the woods 

The dying year has trailed her garments gray; 

Her robes ol flame, from autumn's changeful moods, 
Around her in their beauty softly lay. 

The oak has laid aside its russet crown, 

The maple's lovely leaves of burnished gold 

Sadly and pensively are drifting down. 

Heaping the dim wood paths with fold on fold. 

Where erst the buckeye tossed its waving plumes. 
Where the low murmur of the bee was heard 

Sipping the rare nectar of the scented blooms. 
By every light wind of the forest stirred. 

There is naught left but naked branches grim 
And spectral boughs, the ghost of beauty fled, 

No sweet perfume around it lingering; 
Silent it stands, the wraith of beauty dead. 

The grass that sprung along the Old Year's aisles. 
By gentle rains has cast its weight of seed; 

And now a tender verdure, sweet and wild. 
Springs up— the harbinger of early feed. 

It is as if the Spring walked hand in hand 
With Winter, blustering and stern of frown; 

For lo I a verdure mantles all the land, 
Tho' sere and withered leaves are drifting down. 

It is as if the New Year came apace 
To light the wearied footsteps of the Old ; 

In every ray of sunshine we can trace 
The bud and blossom that shall yet unfold. 

Midwinter and the Old Year dying fast, 
And still she weaves a dainty robe of green 

Ferns and rich mosses and the early grass 
To dress the hills and sodden fields between. 

We look adown her sweet, well-trodden ways, 
Where Spring, the ellin, brought us bloom and 
flowers. 

And trailed her perfumed robes through all the days — 
The long glad days of sunshine and of showers. 

We well remember how the hills were clad 

111 all the verdure of a radiant clime; 
And darksome woods, and somber glens made glad 

With beauty, deftly touched by days divine. 

How fresh the winds came from the waterfall, 
And all the woods were rife with dreamy song; 

And from afar the myriad wild birds' call 
Echoed the emerald vales and hills along. 

Then summer's brightness, come with ling'ring feet. 
And all her airs with bird-notes were atune; 

And the green fields of waving corn and wheat 
Sang whispers to the roses of sweet June. 

There was a languor on the floating breeze; 

A deeper tint upon the blushing rose; 
While sang the oriole thro' the glistening leaves 

That rustled in the golden orange groves. 

By warm soft winds and summer sunshine kissed. 
The vineyard drop't its weight of fragrant blooms 

And purple clusters, gold and amethyst, 
Slow ripened in the cloudless harvest noons. 

Where erst the " header" moved among the wheat, 
And the tanned toilers garnered shining grain. 

The plowman now wooes Nature to repeat 
The generous bounty of her yield again. 

There is the barn, well filled with plenteous clieer. 
With window in the loft that opens wide — 

Round which the white-winged pigeons circling near, 
Essay their noisy young to feed and chide. 

The open sheds, where feed the lowing kine; 

The flocks and herds that sport upon the hills; 
Near by the stream whose noisy waters wind 

Their music with the thunder of the mills. 

It was a bounteous year; praise be to Him 
Who showers blessings on us manifold; 

Albeit some days grew dark and strangely dim. 
When sorrow sought us with its gloom untold. 

We will not dwell on them. The year is past ! 

Fold up our glooms and lay our griefs away; 
Spring flowers will bloom — after the winter's blast, 

New joys are waiting for the coming day. 

For lo I the sun has lit the blue-draped hills, 
Verdure and blossoms crown the grateful earth. 

Rejoice I rejoice ! our hearts re-echo still, 
New hopes and joys come with the New Year's 
birth. 

• Arcudian Mights. 



Perfume FROM Faded R,ose.s. — Instead of 
throwing away bouquets of faded roses.or other 
flowers of special perfume, place the faded or 
dead dry leaves in a couvenient dish and 
sprinkle a little alcohol over thein.and the room 
where they stand will be filled with their odor. 
In England it is a common practice; very large 
vases are kept about rooms, into which all the 
faded rose-leaves are thrown and sprinkled 
with alcohol, and thus a very pleasant atmos- 
phere is secured about the house. There is no 
other way of preparing rose perfume, except 
by the regular process of distilling. Rose flavor 
can be given to cake, if any one fancies it, by 
putting the butter to be used in the cake in a 
saucer or plate, and setting it for some hours 
inside a vase tilled with rose-leaves that are 
pri nkled with alcohol. 



fireside Chats. 

[Written for the Rural Prbss by Hilda Df,i,kstiibr.] 

There are two sides to a shield and two sides 
to a question; and we cannot expect our neigh- 
bors to view either one or the other with our 
eyes, or see it in the light we do, till it has been 
turned fairly around so as to present the special 
side for which we may be tilting. 

Now, about the question of encouraging chil- 
dren to know and remember the names of our 
best authors. It seems not only a desirable, 
but a very essential part of the many things 
they ought to learn from their very first ac- 
quaintance with their well-beloved story-books. 
I do not mean that they should be set the task 
of learning a list of names which would be to 
them meaningless, but when you have read to 
them one of Miss Alcott's stories to which they 
have listened with eager delight, then if you 
tell them who wrote it, and that she always 
writes capital stories for children, they will re- 
member her name with a love and enthusiasm 
that will make them eager for every book she 
writes. Just so it will be with the names of 
Susan Coolidge, Sophia May, J. T. Trowbridge, 
Jacob Abbot and Bayard Taylor. I remember 
how my children fairly bubbled over with rap- 
ture when they began to read Trowbridge's 
stories, and it was just as easy to add his name 
to their list of authors as it would be to remem- 
ber any other dear, delightful friend. If, while 
they are young, you choose books which are 
good and yet interest them, they will begin to 
rely, almost unconsciously, on your judgment, 
and wish to know the authors you love ; and if 
you have the means to gratify your taste they 
will come to value, as you do, Whittier, Long- 
fellow, J. G. Holland, Mrs. Stowe, Miss Wool- 
son, Dickens, Geo. Macdonald — but there, I 
will stop at that author, as I cannot mention 
all, and ask if you have read any of his works ? 
People talk about the greatness of Dickens, but 
certainly Macdonald rivals him in beauty and 
poetry of composition and description of char- 
acter. Some say they cannot understand the 
Scotch dialect which occurs in Macdonald's 
books, but any one who can sing a Scotch song 
will come to like it after a little, and will find 
himself repaid for their careful reading. I 
should think it was not more difficult than the 
dialect used to a greater extent in "That Lass o' 
Lowrie's," by Mrs. Burnett. 

As to the good it will do children to become 
familiar with the names and works of our best 
authors, it will help to keep them from reading 
poor, trashy books which are sometimes worse 
than nothing. Your correspondent who thinks 
" all novels, even the poorest, are nothing more 
nor less than heart histories," has not perhaps 
thought that many of the poorest must be writ- 
ten by persons who care nothing for the heart, 
morals, or life of their readers, but do care for 
the money sensational stories bring, and try 
very little to help tempted humanity to the 
best and most noble ways of living. 

I visited our Teachers' Institute and heard 
the superintendent recommend the teachers to 
direct their scholars' attention to our poets and 
best authors and get them interested in the 
best literature. That seems a step in the right 
direction, for most of them are sure to become 
interested in literature of some kind. And if it 
is well to have a care as to the books we read, 
so is it well to have a care as to the language 
we speak and not readily adopt slang phrases; 
in that I agree with the " Woman of 4-" most 
heartily. 

I have read with pleasure the articles from 
our pleasant " Girl " writers, and am glad they 
show an interest in good books — travels and 
descriptions of dififerent countries — and that 
when they do read stories they try to get the 
best. I would suggest that " A Girl of 
Twenty" take some "nom de plume " more 
easily referred to than her present signature, 
for I hope she will continue writing tor years 
to come. I think she, and "Working Girl" 
and " Wake llobin," and others who have 
written for the Rural, are among the sensible 
girls such as I am always delighted to meet; 
for I do often meet girls who are willing to 
work, who help their mothers and have sensible 
views of life, and I say, " Here is another one 
to prove my theory that good girls are in the 
majority, are the rule and not the exception." 

Our Women. 

Some of our newspapers are altogether too 
sweeping in their denunciations of women, as, 
for example, take the following which I clip 
from a California publication: 

Man is supposed to be the noblest work of God. 
Perhaps he is designed to be, but alas! they fall far 
short of noble manhood and for the sake of money 
do many contemptible things. Woman is little 
better. Her greatest ambition is to outshine some- 
one else in society, consequently she spends wake- 
ful nights in planning new conquests and her days 
in arranging pretty toilets to gain admiration from 
any man but her husband, her father, or brothers. 
From girlhood to womanhood, from youth to old 
age, she spends the precious moments of life in 
frivolity, and finally [passes from earth to the un- 
known land and is soon forgotten by all. Alas! 
for the misspent days, alas! for the wrecked homes. 
* ♦ ♦ 

It is possible that the writer of the above 
does not intend to include even the majority of 
women under this head, yet he makes no excep- 
tion. For married women who do flirt his 
words are none too hard, no, not severe 
enough, for they ought to have passed their 
days of thoughtlessness and to have some rev- 



erence for truth and honesty, and the strength 
of character to live up to the right standard of 
womanhood. Girls can have plenty of real en- 
joyment, fun and laughter, without flirting. 
One of the " Girl " writers seems to think we 
old women are altogether too serious with our 
anxious admonition "don't flirt;" but just 
think of the evil it has led to in some cases 
and then say if you blame mothers for their 
anxiety. 

Hospitality. 

" Old Californians are very liberal," remarked 
a talkative friend; " they don't think so much 
of a dime or of giving away a meal of victuals as 
Eastern people do. " o 

I do not know about that. I remember with 
delight true Eastern hospitality, but I think 
the ingratitude and impositions of tramps are 
making people everywhere chary of trying to 
entertain angels unawares, and even onusing 
them to look coldly upon strangers who 
come driving about in carriages. Think 
of a wealthy man whose business takes him all 
over the State; he drives up to your door about 
noon and you ask him to dinner, and he talks 
all the time he is eating of how he gets his 
meals for nothing, and laughs at the way he 
"sponges " his living from the country people; 
and finally stops on the doorstep to tell you 
seriously how many hundred miles he and his 
wife have traveled, and it never cost them a 
cent for board or lodging. The next time he 
comes, do you think you would feel the same 
free-heartedness when you ask him to dinner 
that you did the first time ? I believe you 
would not. If there is to be " old-fashioned " 
hospitality in the land, the guests must do 
their part toward it. 

Shirtmaking. 

It is actually becoming fashionable in En- 
gland for aristocratic men to wear colored 
shirts, but it is a satisfaction to remember that 
it has been fashionable among farmers in this 
country for many years, and farmers' wives 
have been saved many hours of hard work at 
starching and ironing. Perhaps the miners of 
'49 really set the fashion, as they universally 
adopted the colored woolen shirt, and blue 
cotton and the more fanciful gingham and 
cheviot naturally followed. 

It was different when I was a girl — then my 
father and brothers and all other farmers I 
knew wore white shirts, and worked in their 
shirtsleeves at the roughest work on the farm; 
so the washing, you may be sure, was very 
tedious. Still we were not inventive enough 
to make colored ones for them. 1 have just 
been making cheviot shirts, and I made the 
undersides of the sleeves of double cloth as far 
up as above the elbow and more than half-way 
across the sleeve. It will save mending so 
soon, and it is such a little work to stitch it on 
before putting the sleeve together. Probably 
the aristocracy wear cloth of superior quality — 
the traditional " purple and hue linen," per- 
haps — but whatever it is, our home folks may 
take the comfort of knowing that they are 
really in the bight of fashion now, and that 
they set the fashion themselves. 

The Man in the Kitchen. 



Editors Press: — As I see so many notes on 
housekeeping, I wish to say a few words in 
regard to a man in the kitchen. I think it an 
honor for a man to know how to cook a good 
meal of nice-flavored victuals. My g09d hus- 
band is as handy in the house as some of our 
women. As for my two sons, I teach them 
how to be ready to do any kind of labor in or 
out of doors; it will be good for them by and 
by to know how to keep house. Cooking is a 
delightful calling, even if at times one has but 
little to make a dinner or supper of for the 
hungry. 

My family consists of four — myself, husband 
and two sons. 1 have my kitchen and dining- 
room in one, thus saving many steps; water 
near the door, and wood just as handy and 
plenty of it. As my method is to have a nail 
or shelf for everything and everything in its 
place, a meal can be got up quickly by the 
slowest person. 

If some of those that dread housework 
would go where it is healthy, it would be a 
great deal better. I found this out by my own 
experience, and know it to be so. Health gives 
wealth and comfort. 

I must close for this time. If this doesn't find 
its way into the waste-basket I will give some 
of my experiences in life — that is, as to health 
and labor. Will some one of your many read- 
ers please to give a recipe of onr German grand- 
mothers' way of making soap? 

Mabia C. Shoemaker. 

Owo, Shasta Co. 

Beecher says the country is getting to be 
full of S hour men and 14-hour women. Old 
H. W. struck a keynote in that remark. We 
have never heard of an instance of any labor 
organization of men denouncing less hours of 
work for their wives, but the clamor of the men 
for less work and more pay ascends to the 
heavens. — Simla Ana Standard, 



A Scientific writer tells how hot water can 
be boiled in a sheet of paper. We don't doubt 
it. We have known a man to write a few 
lines on a sheet of writing paper that kept him 
in hot water for three years. — Burdelle. 



The White Cross Movement. 

The object of this organization is so high and 
elevating that it should engage the earnest co- 
operation of eve»y man and woman who be- 
lievaa in whatsoever things are pure, lovely and 
of good report in the world. Even the habitual 
scoffer at righteousness must bow low his 
head in honor to a society whose purpose is to 
secure respect for all women and endeavor to 
protect them from wrong and degradation, and 
which couples with this the endeavor to sup- 
press all indecent language and coarse jests. 
It matters little that the article of the society's 
creed that maintains " the law of purity as 
equally binding upon men and women " may be 
considered by self-indulgent men as the profes- 
sion of an impossible belief. Every man who 
orders his life by such a creed must grow to- 
ward the virtue of the man without sin. 

Were all homes and schools and colleges 
what they should be, there would be no field 
for a society to teach men Paul's message to 
Timothy : " Keep thyself pure." With the 
memory of a mother's watchful care and gentle 
ministrations to influence his life, the man must 
be a monster who treats any woman with less 
than outward respect or whose sympathies do 
not respond to the distress or injury of any 
mother's daughter. 

There must have been something wrong in the 
home life of a man who does not treat all 
women with respect, or who is not interested 
in protecting them from wrong and degrada- 
tion. A son is natarally, though perhaps im- 
perceptibly, influenced by the example of his 
father. Let this be one fif petulance, arro- 
gance or inconsiderate harshness toward the 
wishes and feelings of the mother, the son, 
without knowing it, loses that chivalric bearing 
towaid all women which marks a gentleman in 
overalls as in doeskin. As a man sees women 
treated in his home, so he will generally treat 
them away from home. Of course, education 
and subsequent association may modify his 
manners, but they seldom change his heart. 

Touching the use of indecent language and 
coarse jests, there can be but one opinion. 
They defile the mouth that utters them and 
the mind that is not closed against them. Too 
many men beguile their leisure hours in the in- 
terchange of obscene stories or coarse jokes. 
Against this the White Cross sets its face, and 
all society that loves purity and detests inde- 
cency should espouse so worthy a cause. — 
Chicago News. 

Bad Boys and State Discipline. 

In their final report, rendered the 11th in- 
stant, to the Superior Court, of Santa Clara 
county, the grand jury makes these wise re- 
marks and recommendations: 

We respectfully call the attention of our 
legislative delegation to the urgent necessity 
for a radical change in our penal laws in respect 
to juvenile offenders. Before our criminal 
courts boys, who are mere children in years and 
appearance, are constantly being brought 
charged with offenses of the gravest character. 
To discharge these boys without punishment is, 
in effect, to instruct them that they have com- 
plete immunity for such offenses, to encourage 
them, as well as others, to repeat such crimes, 
aad thus to insure their ruin; while to sen- 
tence them to either the State prison or the 
County Jail, is to confine them with old and 
hardened offenders, whose examples, precepts 
and association are equally fatal to any hope of 
reformation. It is from this condition of affairs 
that the community suffers in present depreda- 
tions and lawlessness, and from it abundant re- 
cruits are assured for the criminal classes of 
the future. In many of these cases home in- 
fluence and parental carelessness, or perhaps 
parental influence, is largely accountable for 
the character and conduct of the children; so 
that the complete severance of these pernicious 
relations is indispensable to any system of re- 
formation. Believing, as we do, that the moral 
obligation resting upon the community calls 
for interference as to these unfortunate youths, 
we think that the lower consideration of mere 
economy points in the same direction; that it 
is cheaper to reform two boys than to ^ard 
against or punish one mature criminal. We 
therefore urge upon our legislative representa- 
tives the imperative necessity of the establish- 
ment, by the State, of a Reform School, of the 
character and conducted upon the system 
found 80 beneficial in nearly all the States, for 
the detention and reformation of youthful 
criminals. 

A Cow Dies ok Grief. — Joseph Perrin lost 
a fine young Ayrshire cow a few days ago un- 
der peculiar circumstances. The cow. Which 
was three years old, had her first calf, for which 
she manifested more than ordinary affection. 
When the calf was three months old it was 
taken away from the mother and sent to the 
butcher block, but from the moment of sepa- 
ration the cow refused to eat, although food 
was constantly accessible to her. The animal 
continued to evince great mental distress, 
bawling almost constantly for several days and 
nights, and finally lay down and died, al- 
though being in excellent condition and show- 
ing no symptoms of diseise. The animal griev- 
ed itself to death for the loss of its calf. Mr. 
Perrin says that in his long experience with cat- 
tle he never knew or heard of a similar case. — 
Cross Valley Union. 



Jan. 1, 1887.] 



f ACIFie F^URAId f ress. 



7 



Smoking Infants at Livermore. 

The trustees of the town of Livermore have 
passed an ordinance prohibiting the sale of to- 
bacco, cigars and cigarettes to certain persons 
and the smoking thereof by such persons in 
public places, as follows : 

Sectiom I. Every person who, within the town 
of Livermore, sells or gives, or causes to be sold or 
given to another, under the age of i6 years, any to- 
bacco, cigars or cigarettes, to be smoked by such 
minor person, is guilty of a misdemeanor and pun- 
ishable by fine not exceeding $20 or by imprison- 
ment not exceeding 10 days, or by both such fine 
and imprisonment; provided that nothing herein 
shall be deemed to apply to the parents or guardians 
of such minor persons or to physicians. 

Sec. 2. Every person under the age of 16 years 
who smokes any pipe, cigars or cigarette in any pub- 
lic street, square, grounds, hall or other public 
places within the town of Livermore, is guilty of a 
misdemeanor and punishable by fine not exceeding 
$10 or by imprisonment not exceeding five days, or 
by both such fine'and imprisonment. 

.Sec. 3. This ordinance shall take effect from and 
after the date of its passage. 

In referring to its passage the Herald ob- 
serves: " We consider the purpose a good one. 
The average cigarette is rankly poison, and has 
a decidedly injurious effect upon a growing boy. 
Whether the practice can be entirely broken up 
in this way, we know not, nor do we assert that 
even a better result cannot be arrived at in some 
other and less energetic way. But this seems 
the readiest method of getting at the evil, and 
we do believe that it will tend to largely de- 
crease, if not prevent it altogether. There 
should be no trouble in enforcing the measure, 
and we anticipate none." 

Antiquity of Man in the United States. — 
Col. Charles Whittlesey has obtained evidence 
of the existence of two races of man, and possi- 
bly of a third intermediate race, as having held 
possession of the northern portion of the Amer- 
ican continent — the more recent of them being 
the North American Indian or red men ; the 
earlier race he terms the mound-builders. The 
antiquaries of Europe regard the people who 
used flint instruments as being prior to those 
who had implements of stone ; and the latter, 
again, as older than the races using bronze or 
other metals. In the United States, the race 
next prior to the white man had very few im- 
plements of stone ; their knives and arrow 
heads, their war implements and their agricult- 
ural tools, were almost entirely of flint ; they 
had very few and rude instruments of native 
copper. The mound-builders, on the contrary, 
who preceded the red men, produced and used 
tools in the reverse order; their axes, adzes, 
and mauls were very numerous, and sometimes 
of stone ; their copper tools abundant ; but 
those of flint, very rare. Hence, in this in- 
stance, the most ancient people were the most 
industrious ; they cultivated the soil ; they 
possessed more mechanical ingenuity, and left 
more prominent and permanent monuments. 
On the Atlantic coast, from Nova Scotia to 
Florida, are numerous shell heaps, identical 
with those of Sweden, Norway and Denmark, 
and known as kjcekkenmseddings. The ex- 
amination of several caves gave bones of the 
wolf, deer, bear, rabbit, etc., mixed with 
skulls of the red race, and not dating back ap- 
parently more than 2000 years. Col. Whittle- 
sey estimates 2000 years as the period also of 
occupation by the mound-building race, which 
does not take us back as far as the beginning of 
the historical period in Asia and Africa. 



How to Sncoeed in Business. 

Don't worry. Don't overwork. 
Don't make the field too broad. 
Be wary of dealing with unsuccessful men. 
Make friends, but don't encourage favorites. 
Keep down expenses, but don't be penurious. 
Keep a high vitality. Sleep well, eat well, 
enjoy life. 

Stick in your chosen pursuit, bat not to 
chosen methods. 

Don't tell what you are going to do — till you 
have done it. 

Enter your charges when the goods are sold. 
Don't wait. 

Make plans for a little way ahead, but don't 
cast them in iron. 

Be content with small beginnings — and be 
sure to develop them. 

Don't take fresh risks to retrieve your losses. 
Cut them off short. 

Be cautious; but when you make a bargain, 
make it quietly and boldly. 

A regular system of sending out bills and 
statements is more effective than spasmodic 
dunning. 

Force of Habit. — " There is nothing in the 
world that shows the inborn tendency of man- 
kind to run in a rut more than the architecture 
of the modern shirt." So said a young man of 
iconoclastic tendencies. " For years men's 
vesta have been buttoned almost up to the chin, 
and the little piece of shirt front that would be 
left exposed has been covered by a necktie. 
And yet men go on wearing shirts with fronts 
down to the waist starched and ironed till they 
are as stiff as a boiled plate, and they pay every 
week for getting two or three of these things 
carefully polished. A man might as well have 
the back of hia vest laundried every week." 



*Y^OUNG ]E[0LKS' CjobUMJ^. 



Look Up, My Boy. 



There is hope in the world for you and me; 
There is joy iOa thousand things that be; 
There is fruit to gather from every tree, 
Look up, my boy, look up I 

There is care and struggle in every life; 
With temper and sorrow the world is rife; 
But no strength cometh without the strife; 
Look up, my boy, look up 1 

There's a place in the land for you to fill; 
There is work to do with an iron will; 
The river comes from the tiny rill, 
Look up, my boy, look up ! 

There are bridges to cross, and the way is long. 
But a purpose m life will make you strong; 
Keep e'er on your lips a cheerful song; 
Look up, my boy, look up ! 

Speak ill of no one; defend the right; 
And have the courage, as in God's sight, 
To do what your hands find with your might; 
Look up, my boy, look up ! 

— Good Cheer. 



€[00 D ^Z^E/cLTH. 



The Tarkey Pa. 

^ [Written for the Rural Press by Mrs. J. M. H ] 
Mamma thought as we had moved into the 
country where there is lots of room for every- 
thing, she would raise some turkeys. The first 
year she raised but one. She didn't under- 
stand just all about them, you see, and some- 
body told her hens made better mothers for 
little turkeys than a mother turkey. So she 
put the tvrrkey-eggs under an old black hen; 
but just as soon as that old hen saw what queer- 
looking things came out of those eggs she was 
just as mad as she could be, and before we 
knew what she was about she had scalped five 
of the poor little things. That left us only 
three. Mamma then found a hen that wasn't 
such an Indian, and gave them to her. She 
was good to them, but two got sick and died 
and then there was but one. 

He grew finely. The next year mamma 
bought a hen turkey and she hatched eight 
little turkeys. An ugly rooster killed one of 
them and — we had chicken for dinner the next 
day — the rest all grew splendidly. They were 
the hungriest little things. Mamma said they 
were always presenting their bills. 

One morning, when they were a few weeks 
old, we found their mother stiff and dead in the 
bottom of the coop. Mamma didn't know what 
in the world she would do with those poor, 
motherless turkeys; but while we were stand- 
ing there, feeding them and talking about it, 
along came the old gobbler, the same one we 
had raised the year before, strutting and gob- 
bling, his feathers all puffed out, his tail spread 
and tilting from right to left. The little tur- 
keys saw him and ran up to him, peeping and 
trying to get under his wings. He looked as- 
tonished. He folded up his tail, drew up his 
wings and laid every one of his feathers flat and 
smooth. He stuck out his red head and looked 
as if he didn't know just what to make of the 
situation. His neck turned purple and then 
white, then red. He looked as if he were em- 
barrassed and was blushing. Finally, he began 
to step around very cautiously, the little tur- 
keys following him and crying "peep, peep." 

At last he seemed to understand about it and 
let them follow him. It was too funny to see 
them trying to get him to hover them. He 
couldn't seem to manage that, but after awhile 
would hunt bugs for tbem and give the alarm, 
which sounds like "quit, quit," when a hawk 
came sailing along. 

Those little turkeys learned to strut and gob- 
ble when they were little bits of things, and 
sometimes, when a little gobbler would be 
strutting along with its tail all spread out so 
fine, a little hen turkey would dart up behind 
him and give one of the inside feathers a tweak, 
and that little gobbler would shut up his tail in 
a jiffy. 

Well, that old fellow took care of them until 
they were grown, and then fought with the gob- 
blers till you would think their necks would be 
twisted off. He was a fine bronze turkey, and 
when standing in the sunlight hia feathers were 
lovely gold, red and brown; he had a golden 
band around his tail, and he loved to spread 
his tail and swell himself up just as big as he 
could, so as to show off fine when any one was 
looking at him. 

After he took care of the little turkeys, we 
called him The Turhey Pa, 

Lynden, W. T. 



The Danger of Kissing. 

There is danger in promiscuous kiss- 
ing, especially in the very common prac- 
tice of grown people, particularly strang- 
ers, in kissing little children. A physi- 
cian lately said to a friend that he never al- 
lowed it in his family. " The danger," he 
said, "is so complicated and yet so certain 
that it would take too much time to describe it 
here. In my case, all kinds of people come to 
my house and office to consult me, and they 
often wait hours. If one of my children hap- 
pen to come in they are almost certain to talk 
to it, and you know almost the first impulse 
with people who notice children is to kiss ttiem. 
Bah ! it makes me shudder — tainted and dis- 
eased breaths, lips blue with cancer, foul and 
decayed teeth. You would kill a stranger who 
would waylay your young lady daughter and 
kiss her by force, but the helpless, innocent, 
six-year-old child, susceptible as a flower to 
every breath that blows, can be saluted by 
every one who chances to think of it. I tell 
you it wasn't Judas alone who betrayed by a 
kiss. Hundreds of lovely blooming children 
are kissed into their graves every year." 

" But, doctor, how can a mother be so un- 
gracious as to refuse to allow people to notice 
her sweet little children ?" 

" There need be no ungraciousness, or, if 
there were, which is the more important, the 
safety and well-being of the child or the per- 
mitting of a habit of ill breeding and doubtful 
morality at best ? Let the mother teach her 
child that it is not a kitten or a lapdog, to be 
picked up and fondled by every stranger, and 
instruct it to resist any attempt to kiss it. 
Why, there are agents, peddlers of household 
wares, who make it a custom to catch up a 
prattling child, kiss and pet it, and so interest 
the mother that she will buy something she 
does not want. I tell you there is death in the 
kiss ! The beloved and lamanted Princess Alice 
of Hesse took diphtheria from the kiss of her 
child and followed it to her grave. Diphtheria, 
malaria, scarlet fever, blood poison and death 
lurk in these kisses." 



Hints on Eating Fruit. — A correspondent 
of the San Diego Union furnishes the following 
very useful and suggestive hints on eating fruit, 
the latter portion of which we would call to 
the special attention of our city retail fruit 
dealers: — " The Health Officer some time since 
called attention to the danger of eating old or 
partially decayed fruit. This matter cannot be 
too strongly urged upon the public. There is 
still another source of alimentary diseases which 
seem to me equally dangerous, viz. : the eating 
of raw fruit over which iunumerable flies have 
crawled. How often have we seen boxes of 
grapes on the sidewalk literally swarming with 
flies 1 When we think of the unspeakably filthy 
quarters from which those flies have gathered 
and the ease with which disease is thus carried 
from the sick to the healthy, we may well hesi 
tate to buy and eat grapes thus unprotected 
I speak of this fruit especially, because it is 
nearly always eaten raw, and the ordinary rinse 
does not at all remove the dangerous specks 
from its skin. Will not our fruit dealers, 
especially on warm days, make a more liberal 
use of netting ? " 

A New Disinfectant. — A new disinfecting 
compound for purifying the atmosphere of the 
sick-room has recently been presented to the 
Berlin Medical Society. Oils of rosemary, lav- 
ender and thyme, in the proportion of 10, 2J 
and 2J parts respectively, are mixed with nitric 
acid in the proportion of 30 to 1^. The bottle 
should be shaken before using, and a sponge 
saturated with the compound and left to diffuse 
by evaporation. Simple as it is, the vapor of 
this compound is said to possess extraordinary 
properties in controlling the odors and effluvia 
of offensive and infectious disorders. 



San Jose Rebukes Santa Barbara. — Santa 
Barbara has permitted the celebration of its 
centennial to be disgraced by a brutal bullfight. 
The horns of one of the bulls exhibited were saw- 
ed off, after he had given proof of prowess, and 
those of the next bull were sawed off in advance 
by the cowards who managed the affair. Two 
horses were lifted in the air and another terribly 
gored. These cruelties were followed by a 
barbarous exhibition of the riata, in which one 
of the wild horses had his neck l>roken. After 
this, residents of Santa Barbara should be dub- 
bed barbarians — without the Santa. — S. Jose 
Times. 



Earth Infections. — A barrel of kerosene 
oil buried 10 feet under ground will, it is said, 
contaminate every well within a quarter of a 
mile, and the oil will be apparent to the taste 
The accumulations of privy vaults will extend 
their pernicious influence even a greater dis 
tance, although the water which it affects may 
not indicate to the taste the presence of any im- 
purity. Whether privy vaults are open or 
plastered with cement, they cannot keep the 
poisonous gases and substances from penetrat 
ing the surrounding soil. 



Coffee and Ego for Sick Persons. — A sick 
person wanting nourishment and having lost ap 
petite, can often be sustained by the following, 
when nothing else could be taken: Make a 
strong cup of coffee, adding boiling milk as 
usual, only sweetening rather more ; take an 
egg, beat yolk and white together thoroughly ; 
boil the coffee, milk and sugar together, and 
pour it over the beaten egg in the cup you are 
going to serve it in. This simple receipt is used 
frequently in hospital practice. 



Deaths from Alcoholism, so the New York 
Herald asserts, have decreased during the last 
15 years from a ratio of 111 to 45 jn each 1000. 



X)ojviESTie Qeoj^JojviY. 



Apple Charlotte. — Butter a deep dish 
thickly. Cut smooth slices of bread and spread 
them with butter, and line the bottom and 
sides of the dish. Fill it with sliced sour apples. 
Sprinkle each layer of apples with brown sugar 
and any spice you prefer, also a few small bits 
of butter. Soak sonie slices of bread for a 
minute in milk or water; lay them on the top 
and cover them with a plate that will fit close, 
and lay a weight upon that. Bake two and a 
half hours in a moderate oven. It should turn 
out whole into another dish. Serve with cold 
sauce. 

Rice Cake. — One cup of cold boiled rice, 
three eggs, a tablespoonful of melted lard and 
the same of sugar; three large cupfuls of warmed 
milk, a cupful of flour, one teaspoonful of bak- 
ing powder sifted twice with the flour, one even 
teaspoonful of salt. Beat the yolks light; rub 
the sugar and lard together and add to these, 
then the milk and salt, and lastly the whipped 
whites and flour alternately; beat hard one 
minute. Bike in a quick oven in two " birch " 
tins, and eat before it falls. 



Orange Marmalade. — Six large, sweet or- 
anges and juice of two lemons; shred into fine 
pieces with a sharp knife, leaving out the seeds; 
put into a preserving kettle with two quarts of 
cold water, and let it stand all night; boil for 
one hour and add five pounds of sugar and boil 
one hour longer, or until the syrup is quite 
thick; fill jelly tumblers or small jars, and when 
cool, cover closely. I like this better than 
when made with bitter oranges. It will keep a 
long time and ia easily made. 



Dumplings. — One cup of sweet milk, one egg, 
one heaping tablespoonful of butter, salt, one 
teaspoonful of soda, two teaspoonfuls of cream of 
tartar; rub the butter with a little flour to a 
cream, then add the remaining ingredients, 
with enough flour to make it very stifi'. Drop 
the batter by tablespoonfuls on a greased pie 
tin, and steam about 30 minutes. This will 
make seven good-sized ones, which can be di- 
vided, and they cannot fail to be light. 

Sugar Cakes. — Half a pound of dried flour, 
one-fourth pound of fresh butter, one-fourth 
pound of tine, white sugar; mix the flour 
and sugar together, and then rub in the 
butter and yolk of an egg beaten with a table- 
spoonful of cream or new milk; make it into a 
paste, roll and cut into small cakes; bake upon 
a floured baking tin or shallow tin pan. A little 
grated nutmeg improves these cakes; a cake ex- • 
pressly for the wee folks. 

Cocoanut Cookies. — One grated cocoanut, 
one cup of powdered sugar, the whites of three 
eggs beaten to a stiff meringue, one tablespoon- 
ful of cornstarch wet with tlie cocoanut milk if 
sweet, if not, with water; one teaspoonful of 
rose water; whip meringue and sugar together, 
add cornstarch, cocoanut and rose water. Stir 
well and drop on buttered paper by the spoon- 
ful. Bake in a quick oven. Eat cold. 

Stewed Apples with Rice. — Scoop out the 
cores and peel some fine russet apples and stew 
them in clarified sugar. Boil some rice in milk 
with a pinch of salt, and sugar enough to 
sweeten it. Leave on the fire until the rice ia 
quite soft and has absorbed nearly all the milk; 
place in a dish; arrange the stewed apples on 
the rice and put in the oven to remain until 
they are of a golden color. 

Boiled Cider Apple Sauce. — One. half 
bushel sweet apples, four pounds of sugar, a 
few quinces; put in sweet cider enough to 
cover the apples; boil and skim for four or five 
hours. This is superior to the old-fashioned 
boiled cider apple sauce, which was made of 
cider that had been boiled down separately, in- 
stead of doing all the cooking in the same oper- 
ation. 

Milk Mush. — Three cups of hot milk, one 
cup of boiling water, one scant cup of white 
Indian meal, one even teaspoonful of salt. Scald 
the salted meal with the boiling water, and 
stir into the hot milk; boil in a farina-kettle 
for 20 minutes, stirring all the time; beat hard 
at the last, and serve in an uncovered dish. 
Eat with sugar and cream. 

Plain Mince Pie. — Two quarts of chopped 
meat, two quarts of chopped apples, one quart 
of sugar, one pint of molasses, one pint of water 
in which the meat was boiled, one quart stoned 
raisins, one tablespoonful of ground cloves, two 
of cinnamon, two nutmegs, two tablespoonfuls 
of salt; moisten with cider. 

Bread Fritters. — Cut thin, round slices of 
bread, butter them very thinly, spread with 
jam and stick together in pairs. Fry in boil- 
ing lard, after dipping them in a batter of one 
egg, one pint of milk, a pinch of salt and flour 
enough to make a pancake batter. Pile high on 
a dish and sprinkle with sugar. 

White Mountain Cake. — Four eggs, two 
cups of sugar, one cup of butter, one and one- 
half cups of milk, four cups of flour and two 
teaspoonfuls of yeast powder. This makes two 
loaves. 

White Cake. — Whites of three eggs, one 
cup white sugar, two teaspoonfuls of cream of 
tartar, one of soda, one-half cup of sweet milk, 
butter size of an egg, three cups of flour. 



8 



f ACIFie f^URAlo f RESS 



[Jan. 1, 1887 



A. T. DEWEV. W. B. EWER. 

PubUshed by DEWEY & CO. 



Offirr, 252 Market St., N. E. cor. front St., 8. F. 
«■ Take the Klevat»r. Ao. IS Front Sf."S» 



Our Subscription Rates. 

Ot'R SuBSCRiPTioK R»Ti!» »re TH»«B DOLLARS a year, in 
Bdtaiice. if continued 8iihscri|itlon8 are not prepaid in 
advance, for an\ reason, twkntv pivb cK.vrs extra will be 
charged for each year or fraction of a year. J*"No new 
namcB placed on the liat without cash In advance. 
Affents wanted. 

N. B.— Subscriptions becoming delinquent after March 
1, 1886, will be charged twbntt-fivi cesib extra— all be- 
fore that PIPTT CIKTS. 

Advertising Rates. 

1 Week. 1 Month. S Months. 1 Tear. 

Per Line (ajrate) $.25 « .80 $2.20 $6.00 

HaU inch (1 square). . . 1.00 3.00 8.00 24.00 

One inch 2.00 5.00 14.00 45.00 

Lartre advertisements at favorable rates. Special or 
reading notices, legal advertisements, notices appearing 
in extraordinary type, or in particular parts of the paper, 
at ipecial rates. Four insertions are rated in a month. 



Registered at S. F. Post Office «■ second-class mail matter. 

SCIENTIFIC PRESS PATES T AOSNCT. 
DEWET & CO., Patbht SoLiaiORS. 

A. T. DIWIT. W. B. IWUU «. B. STSONS 

SAN FRANCISCO: 

Saturday, January i, 1887, 
TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



BDITORIALS.— Our New atizens; A New Year's 
Outing, 1. The Week; A Happy New Year; Fruit 
Movements in Southern California; Life, Liberty and 
the Pursuit of Happiness, 8. The Wool Interest; 
Twine in California; California Climate and Buckskin, 
9. 

ILLUSTRATIONS.— A Ramble on a Sunny New 
Year's Morning in California, 1. The Latest Fashions, 
11. 

CORRESPONDENCE.— Artisan Farmers; Hillside 
and N alley; Vaca and Adjacent Valleys, 2. 

THE FIELD.— Distribution of Seeds and Plants, 2. 

POULTRY YARD.— Food for Thought on Several 
Topics, 3. 

ARBORICULTURE.— The French Walnut Varie- 
ties, 3. 

PATRONS OF HUSBANDRY.— Government 
Telegraph; Enterprise Orange; Grange Elections; In- 
stallations Coming; Ilesolutions of Respect; A Grange 
Called for; Orange Work and Progress; A Farmers' 
Pork Comjiany; Manly and Gentlemanly; Wheatland 
Grange; .Snelling Grange; Healdsburg Orange, 4. 

AGRXCOLTURAL NOTES— From the various 
counties of California, 4-5. 

THE HOME CIRCLE.— Farewell to the Old Year! 
Hail to the New; Fireside Chats; The Man in the 
Kitchen; The White Cross Movement; Bad Boys and 
State Discipline. 6- Smoking Infants at Livermore; 
How to Succeed in Kusiness, "7. 

YOUNO FOLKS' COLUMN.-Look Up, My Boy; 
The Turkey Pa, 7. 

GOOD HEALTH.— The Danger of Kissing; Hints on 
Eating Fruit; A New Ulsinfectant; Earth Infections; 
Coffee and Egg for Sick Persons, 7. 

DOMESTIC EOONOMY.-Apple Charlotte; Rice 
Cake; Orange Marmalade; Dumplings; Sugar Cakes; 
Cocoanut Cookies; Stewed Apples with Rice; Boiled 
(;ider Apple Sauce; Milk Mush; Plain Mince Pie; Bread 
Fritters; White Mountain Cake; White Cake, 7. 

BNTOMOLOQIOAL.— Worms in the Apples; Reme- 
dies for the Codlin Moth, 0. 

FRUIT MARKETING.— The Fruit Problem; Mr. 
Weinstock Proposed for Manager; What the New York- 
ers Think of It, 10. 

FLORICULTURE.— Notes on Roses, Etc., 10. 



Business Annoimcemeiits. 

Agricultural Implements— Hawlev Bros. 

Agricultural Machinery — Byron Jackson. 

Spray Pumps — Woodiu & Little. 

Yerba Buena Jerseys— Henry Pierce. 

Seeds— Th'is. A. Cox & Co. 

Barnard's Business College. 

West Jersey Nursery Co.— Bridgeton, N. J. 

Poultry — H. J. Godfrey, San Leanero, Cal. 

Seeds— Hiram Sibley, Kocheater, N. Y. 

Dividend Notice— S. F. Savings Union. 

Golden Gate Incubator Co.- East Oakland, Cal. 

Pacific Incubator Co. — Oakland, Cal. 

Seeds — Tne Storrs Ji Harrison Co., Painesville, 0. 

W5ee AdvertisiTtg Columns. 



The Week. 

The rain has come, although up to tbia writ- 
ing, Wednesday afternoon, it does not appear 
how wide or deep the downpour may prove. 
The manner of its coming affords a timely illus- 
tration of the fact mentioned in the Rural two 
weeks ago that the rains come from the north, 
while the wind blows from the opposite direc- 
tion. The statement is, of course, not new, 
and yet many people do not realize the fact. 
This storm was telegraphed from Shasta and 
Bntte counties several hours before the first 
drop fell in this latitude. It is to be hoped 
that the storm will prove an earnest and effect- 
ive one. It is not too late to do much good, al- 
though probably the shortness of the working 
season will restrict the area which can be seed- 
ed in time for proBtable growth. Along the 
coast the rain will refresh the pastures, al- 
though they have been growing well and could 
have stood a longer drouth. 

The coming of the rain, if it prove as gener- 
ous as we now hope, will add much to the hap- 
piness of the New Year's holiday. It will 



wake up business, bring courage to the Legis- 
lature and to the people, one to do and the 
other to bear, and generally minister to confi- 
dence and activity. 

A Happy New Year. 

The friendly greetings we toss so freely about 
at the opening of a new year have a beautiful 
meaning and value. They mean that we have, 
for once at least, risen so far above the narrow 
life of self as to wish others well. This is 
no small thing to do. When one can 
sincer^ wish only good for all others, he has 
got beyond self and come into the great, warm 
life of humanity. He has conquered enmity, 
envy and jealousy. This does not mean to 
overlook the wrongs and vices of others, for 
that would not be well-wishing. No greater 
evil cad befall many people than to go on happy 
and content in their present way of life. It 
means when we can wish all others well, that 
we desire for them all honorable success and all 
proper enjoyment. There is a real value in 
this state of mind. It is a blessing to the one 
who possesses it as well as to others. It in- 
creases the joy of one who lives in that state, 
and it goes out in fragrant helpfulness and en- 
couragement to all others. And how much we 
all need encouragement, and what a sweet in- 
spiration there is in the thought that in the 
hurry of life we are not forgotten. Blessed 
will be the day when every human soul can say 
from the heart, " A Happy New Year ! " 

What a strange glow of enchantment always 
hangs over the dawn of a new year. We are 
not invited to move over old ground. The eye 
opens upon a new landscape and the ear bends 
to new music. There is no routine in real life. 
The external outlines may seem the same. We 
live in the same houses, do business in the same 
old office, shop, or store, and pass along the 
streets we have traveled for years; but the 
heart and mind do not remain the same. If the 
years are repetitions with any one, it is because 
the enthusiasm of the heart has been killed. 
Nature hates a stationary life as she does 
standing water. It is the activity of the ocean 
that makes its purity and cures the invalid who 
breathes its washed and filtered air. Hence 
the true soul is willing to let the past slip away, 
for the future is so fresh and new. So let every 
one make his calls, and pass around gaily his 
Happy New Year's greeting. 

Those who aim at the highest ideals, who 
earnestly desire to make the most of themselves, 
have it as a habit to recall the past, and in the 
light of experience try and shape a better future. 
It may be well for us all, at least once a year, to 
let this busy world stand aside and take a 
thought of self, try and find out our bearings 
and see if we can make out where we are, and 
whither going. There is an indication of the 
fitness of things that prompts men to begin 
new studies, enterprises of business, or start on 
a journey at some fresh period of time. The 
clock-work of the universe is so arranged as to 
furnish many favorable opportunities. Time is 
not so much a line as a circle, and when one 
cycle is complete, a new day, week, month or 
year comes to start us all in new movements or 
enterprises. And there is no better time than 
at the opening of the new year. All men in- 
stinctively feel that this is a good time to close 
old books and open new ones. That it is a fit- 
ting hour to open a new account with Time. 
True, we may have made many good vows and 
resolutions and soon forgotten them. But it is 
better to flutter a broken wing than not at- 
tempt to fly. It is better to sail toward better 
things in a leaky boat, bailing it out all the way, 
than not to sail at all. Forward ! is the word of 
command borne in upon us by the new year. It 
says to us all, make amends for the errors and 
follies of the past year by extracting all the 
honey out of the coming one. Let not the dead 
past stand between us and the fair promise of 
the future. It is an old saying that it is easier 
to preach than practice, but the Rural sincerely 
wishes all its patrons, friends and readers a 
Happy New Year. 

iRRiOATioy.— It is now rumored that Lux 
& Miller and Haggin & Carr have agreed to a 
division of the contested waters and will stop lit- 
igation. Nothing is definitely known of such an 
arrangement, however, at this writing. If these 
two contending parties hold themselves aloof 
from Sacramento this winter, it will possibly 
aid in fair d'scassion and decision on the qnes- 
tions involved. 



Frait Movements in Southern California. 

The inability of the various competing trans- 
portation lines to agree on rates, and the frangi- 
bility of the numerous compacts into which they 
enter, bid fair to do California producers good 
service again. As a matter o^ fact, if it conid 
be demonstrated that competition would always 
exist between different companies, the trans- 
portation question would quickly settle itself. 
There should, of course, be free scope for com- 
petition in carrying, as in other lines of busi- 
ness, and then rates would soon adjust them- 
selves upon a fair basis. 

A turn of affairs which now seems imminent 
promises to help our Southern California or- 
ange-growers in quite a satisfactory way. The 
following statement of affairs is given by an ex- 
change: 

Complications have arisen between the Southern 
Pacific Company and the California Southern by 
which the oiange shippers of this State are bound to 
profit, although to what extent is not known as yet. 
A stiff rate of $300 a carload on oranges to Chicago, 
not affected in the slightest degree by the overland 
trafiic war, has been maintained for a long time on 
both the roads and their Eastern connections, al- 
though other freight of greater value has gone at as 
low a rate as $60 a carload. It is now made known 
that the high rates were the result of an agreement 
on honor between the Los Angeles trafiic agents of 
the California Southern and the Southern Pacific 
Company, made under the instruction of their head 
officials. Subsequent to this agreement on orange 
rates an understanding was reached between the 
two roads that no green fruit or raisins should be 
shipped on passenger trains at freight rates. Not 
long ago General Freight and Passenger Agent Wil- 
kins, of the California Southern, made the discovery 
that, acting under instructions from Fourth and 
Townsend streets, the Southern Pacific Company's 
agent at I_.os Angeles had made a promise to a num- 
ber of heavy orange shippers that if they would 
stand by the Southern Pacific during the present 
season they would be given a rebate of $25 a car- 
load on all the oranges sent to com petitive points. 
To this the shippers readily agreed. By careful in- 
quiry Mr. Wilkins also learned that the Southern 
Pacific Company had contracted with the leading 
firm of raisin shippers in this city to transport all of 
its raisins on passenger cars at freight rates. By 
this action on the part of the Southern Pacific Com- 
pany the C^alifornia Southern feels justified in mak- 
ing what rates it chooses in order to get the business 
out of the southern points of fruit shipment this sea- 
son. It is no longer inclined to make terms with 
the .Southern Pacific Company regarding agreed 
rates, and all traffic agreements between the two 
lines are off. 

If all these statements are true it will help 
the orange-growers materially in their contest 
for the Eastern markets. It is announced that 
Florida growers are hurrying their fruit north- 
ward for fear another freeze will catch it on the 
trees, and that there are large supplies arriving 
from the Mediterranean region. The Atlantic 
seaboard cities do not count upon California 
fruit reaching them in any considerable amount, 
on account of the high freights. A war in rates 
would send California oranges to all parts of the 
East, though the Western markets properly be- 
long to us, and would naturally be supplied 
first. 

There are many rumors 'arriving of great fruit 
enterprises in Southern California in the shape 
of canneries and drying establishments. Some 
of the rumors are denied, but there is no doubt 
that the industrial growth of the South will be 
magnificent during 1887, if a fairly prosperous 
season invites investments. It is announced by 
telegraph that Riverside will have a large cold 
storage concern, to be called the Inter-Ocean 
Cold Storage Company, and that they are put- 
ting up works at a cost of $40,000, having a ca- 
pacity to cool for shipment 10 carloads of fruit 
per day. The fruit after being cooled is shipped 
in refrigerator cars and arrives in the Eastern 
market in as good condition as it was when first 
picked from the trees or vines. The company 
has experimented at Santa Ana during the past 
season to such an extent as to make sure of 
their position. 

Improved Cattle in Orkoon. — The Farmer 
and Dairyman of Portland says that T. A. 
Fletcher, of the Indiana Blooded Stock Com- 
pany, recently arrived at the Portland stock 
yards with two carloads of pure-bred cattle, 40 
head of them Herefords and 4 Polled Angus. 
They were sent from the company's breeding 
farms near Indianapolis. The cattle all arrived 
in fine condition, in spite of their long journey. 

Another overland railroad rate war seems 
imminent — whereat the tourist will rejoice. 
While the S. P. folks profess to be holding up 
to their schedule rates, cuts of $10 to $20 are 
said to have been made on the A. & P., with 
prospects of speedy increase. 

Certain parties have in contemplation the 
establishment of a flax factory in Menlo Park, 



Better Rates for Payment in Advance. 

Wnnted -80,000 New Sabiwrlben In I8S7. 

We are desirous of furnishing the Rural 'Press 
to subscribers at as low a price as possible without 
sacrifice to ourselves or lessening its good qualities 
as a clean, handsomely printed and valuable read- 
ing journal. While we cannot see our way to re- 
duce the regular price below its present rate of $3 
per year, we have determined to try the plan of 
offering greater inducements for all subscribers to 
pay as far in advance as possible, hoping thereby to 
greatly increase the number of our patrons, and, if 
possible, improve its issues from time to time. 

Therefore, during a period of sixty days from date, 
to all subscribers paying $3 in advance we shall give 
thirteen and a half months (one year and six weeks) 
credit. For $1.50 in advance, six months and three 
weeks. Subscribers delinquent less than one year 
will be charged at the rate of $3 a year up to the 
time of paying, and will be allowed two months 
and an extra No. for each fifty cents paid in ad- 
vance. In case any arrearages should occur beyond 
12 months, $3. 50 a year will be charged. All agents 
and clerks are required to adhere to these terms. No 
new names entered on the list without payment in 
advance. 

All our premiums are offered under these terms, 
except that for seeds. 

It is not at present possible for any firm on this 
coast (if indeed anywhere else) to offer better rates 
than these, for any length of time, and do justice to 
themselves while furnishing as good a paper as the 
Pacific Rural Press. 

yan. I, 1887. 

Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of 
Happiness. 

It is doubtless the right of every man to de- 
cline to work for any other man or any corpora- 
tion if he be not satisfied with the terms they 
offer, but it is not his right to forcibly interfere 
with others in working on such terms as they 
choose to accept; and when men conspire and 
resort to violence with the purpose of compell- 
ing another to carry on a business for their 
benefit on such terms as they may dictate, they 
become enemies of society. 

The rioters in San Francisco who last week 
attacked peaceable citizens in the pursuit of 
their lawful avocations, destroyed property and 
even assaulted municipal officers, haTe injured 
the noble cause of labor incalculably by their 
mad outlawry. They tend to prove the truth of 
the assertion that " the tyranny of organized 
labor is fnll as remorseless as that of organized 
capital." And the perpetrators of such murder- 
ous acts as have been attempted here the present 
week, by those who deny other men's right to 
" life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness" 
except on such conditions as these lawless ban- 
ditti themselves prescribe, should be hunted 
down by the combined powers of the whole 
community and meet the speedy fate of J. 
Wilkes Booth and like assassins. The repre- 
sentatives both of labor and capital should join 
the officers of the law in detecting and bringing 
to justice these cowardly masked miscreants. 

Grapes from Spain. — Weinstock & Lnbin, of 
Sacramento, have recently favored us with a 
sample of Almeria grapes which grew on the 
Mediterranean coast of Spain and came, packed 
in corkdust, across the sea and through the 
wintry weather of our Eastern States. The 
berries are of a light-green color and shaped 
much like the Cornichon. They are watery 
and insipid in flavor even beside the FUme 
Tokay, and have little to commend them as a 
table grape , save their capacity for enduring a 
long journey. But, considering that they have 
traveled 7000 or 8000 miles, they are in wonder- 
fully fresh condition, and we watch with no 
little interest and curiosity to see how long, in 
their corkdust stronghold, they will withstand 
decay. It may be added that these are the grapes 
which have hitherto found so large a market on 
our Atlantic Coast. The arrivals from Almeria 
In New York for the season of 188.3 were reck- 
oned at 112,000 50-pound kegs; for 1884, 50,- 
000: for 1885, 56,000; and for 1886 (Sept. 15th 
to Nov. 15th) 159,000 kegs. (The falling off of 
shipments during the years 1884-85 was charge- 
able to heavy rains in the vineyard region.) 
Wherever our native fruit can be laid down be- 
side the imported, the California grapes must 
be given a decided preference to the Spanish, 



Jan. 1, 1887] 



PAClFie R.URAI0 f RESS. 



9 



The Wool laterest. 

As Congress haa reassembled, we are greeted 
with new rumors of the purpose of the reform- 
ers, either to put wool on the free list, or to 
still further reduce the protective duty upon 
it. The telegraph announces that " free wool " 
is one of the items in the scheme of the Secretary 
of the Treasury, and almost at the same time 
comes the following timely announcement from 
Washington, by telegraph: 

If the revenue reformers can revise the tariff this 
session, they propose to put wool on the free list. 
The report issued to-day by the State Department 
on the woolen mills of Scotland, by Consul Malm- 
rose, of Leith, shows what the laboring men of the 
United States must contend with to compete with 
foreign woolen manufacturers who have free wool. 
The average weekly wages paid men in the Scotch 
mills is as follows: Carders, common hands, $4.38; 
second hand, $5.11; spinners, $6.08; weavers, $7.30; 
scourers, $5.11; shearers, $4.38; pushers, $4 38; 
overseers of dyes, $8.51; slushers, $4.38; blacksmiths, 
$6.08; knotters, $2.92; darners, $3.89. 

One would think that these figures would 
open the eyes of the reformers to the evil which 
such a scale of wages would work in this coun- 
try. Oan we a£rord to reduce our wool interest 
to competition with such priced labor? 

J. D. Weeks, in his special report on the late 
national census, furnishes some interesting mat- 
ter concerning the woolen industry of the coun- 
try, which is summarized by the Boston Jour- 
nal of Commerce, as follows: The data which 
he was able to gather were, to him, quite [satis- 
factory, which, of course, make it more ac- 
ceptable to the general reader. With very 
few exceptions, the running time of woolen 
mills is from 10 to 11 hours a day, the latter 
time being mostly in vogue in 1880; but within 
the last year or two several States have legis- 
lated to the eflfect of constituting 10 hours as 
an average day's labor, which proba- 
bly brings the 10-hour and ll-hottr 
plans about on an equality, as to the 
number of establishments adopting them. 
It appears that in some parts of the country, 
mills are operated from sun to sun. Mr. 
Weeks does not discover any special change for 
the better, in the efficiency of labor, except that 
which follows experience. Improvements in 
this respect relate more to individuals than to 
the entire labor force. The manufacture of 
higher grades of goods impels the employment 
of efficient labor, or the best that can be se- 
cured, and when this cannot be obtained from 
the local population, recourse to the factories of 
Europe is not infrequently made. But the lack 
of gain in the efficiency of labor is more than 
made up by the great advance in the efficiency 
of machinery, which has reduced the occupation 
of the mill hand, in many particulars, to that 
of a mere tender of a machine. Whera skill is 
mostly observed is in the directing power of the 
person in charge, whose education must be de- 
rived from a theoretical and practical training 
in the technics of his vocation, for the accom- 
plishment of the best results. Perhaps no im- 
provements in machines have been so notice- 
able as in the devices for spinning and weav- 
ing. In the first respect, the changes for the 
better have been the work of comparatively 
very recent years, by reducing the cost of la- 
bor for spinning yarn fully one-half. In the 
second respect, the progress has been only less 
marked, by effecting a reduction in the cost of 
labor and increasing the amount of production, 
without diminishing the earnings of the em- 
ploye. 

One of the principal woolen factories in the 
country is the Fitchburg, Mass., mill. I'hat 
mill is taken by which to show the progress 
which has been made in the economy of woolen 
manufactures during the last 20 years. At this 
mill the " cost of labor per yard of 3-4 standard 
cassimeres " was 25 cents in 1865, 25^ cents in 
1870, 18J cents in 1875, and 19| cents in 1880. 
Though the cost of labor was less per yard in 
1880 than in 1865 or in 1870, the percentage of 
wages to cost of the manufactured goods was 
the reverse, being 12J per cent in 1865, and 12^ 
per cent in 1870, to 29i per cent in 1880. The 
same relative condition has been the experience 
of a number of other mills in New England, 
This is to be accounted for in the less cost of 
the materials that enter into the fabrication of 
the goods. It further shows that wages have 
not suffered in reduction, in proportion to the 
fall in the prices of merchandise, raw or other- 
wise, and to this extent labor is better paid to- 
day than it was 20 years ago. 

To carry out the scheme for free wool would 
be to turn the course of wages backwi^rd and to 



make unprofitable the invention and investment 
which have brought into existence our improved 
mechanical appliances. More than that, it would 
reduce the price of wool so that our grand wool- 
growing interest would be swept away. We do 
not think the country is ready for any such sac- 
rifice, in fact the November elections clearly de- 
clared that it did not favor such a course. 



Twine in California. 

In the announcement of seeds offered for dis- 
tribution by the University, which we publish 
on another page, will be found mention of fiber 
flaxes and the intimation that the growing of 
the crop may be profitable if suitable machines 
and processes are used to prepare the fiber for 
the twine-makers. We are assured that the 
manufacturers are quite ready to use the mate- 
rial when it is offered them in suitable form. 

One of the specialties of the Oakland cotton 
factory is the manufacture of twine — the curi- 
ously wound balls of white cotton twine which 
are so much used by traders in tying up little 
parcels, and by the ladies in crocheting many 
of their little table and mantel ornaments, etc. 
The process of winding these balls is curious 
and interesting, and is done by an ingeniously 
devised piece of machinery, by means of which 
one girl or boy may wind 20 or 30 balls — 
according to the size of the machine — in less 
than five minutes. There are twines and twines 
in great number and variety. Few persona have 
any idea of the immense consumption of this 
article. One of the greatest demands comes 
from the farmers in the Eastern States, who, 
it is said, consume 35,000 tons annually on their 
self-binding harvesters. 

In California we use twine- binders too, espe- 
cially in the coast valleys where the fields are 
not large enough for the profitable use of the 
combined harvesters, and it would be quite an 
advantage to have the twine manufactured 
on this coast. The twine used on the self- 
binder is generally made either of Sisel or Ma- 
nila hemp. The Sisel is the cheaper material, 
but is not so strong or durable as the Manila. 
In some twines a mixture of the two is em- 
ployed. For binder purposes the twine should 
have 16 turns to the foot, and a length of three 
feet would have a breaking strength of not leas 
than 70 pounds. The twine must be ^refuUy 
made, free from swells or knots, or it will not 
run smoothly through the knotting device of 
the binder. The average consumption of twine 
on a binder harvester is two pounds per acre. 
About 1200 feet of twine per acre is required. 
It costs the farmer about 25 cents an acre for 
his twine. Allowing 5 pounds to the mile in 
length of twine, the total consumption of Eastern 
farmers would make a length of string sufficient 
to go more than six times around the earth. 
Manila hemp makes much better twine than 
auy other fiber, being stronger, smoother and 
more durable. The raw material coats n*)re 
and its twine sells for more than Sisel hemp, 
but the Manila twine goes further and is actual- 
ly cheaper in use for the farmer; but this fact, 
however, is not appreciated by him, and he 
sticks to the Sisel twine because offered a little 
less per pound than the better article of Manila. 
Then, again, the Sisel twine breaks much 
oftener while running through the binder than 
the Manila. At every break the farmer must 
stop his machine and spend 10 or 20 minutes to 
fix up. He never thinks of charging his lost 
time against his poor twine. As long as he gets 
it for a cent or two less than the better article 
be is perfectly satisfied, no matter if it does 
bother him. 

If we do not use such a large amount of twine 
in proportion to our wheat crop in our way of 
cutting it, we use far more in sacking than they 
do at the East, and thus the use of twine by 
the sack-sewers on the combined harvesters or 
with the ordinary thrashers becomes a large 
item. After this comes the large consumption 
of twine in nets, in wrapping bundles, etc., and 
it becomes quite apparent that it will be an im- 
portant consideration to have it manufactured 
here. We trust the growth of fiber flax and 
other textiles may be found profitable in this 
State. 

The building of the Santa Rosa & Benicia 
Railroad is now contracted for. The work is 
to be commenced within 60 days and finished 
by January 1, 1888. It will give employ- 
ment to 500 or 1000 men. The people of Santa 
Rosa appear in fine spirits at the state of the 
enterprise. 



California Climate and Buckskin. 

There are 20 glove factories in this State, 
half of which are in San Francisco. The ex- 
traordinarily rapid growth of the glove-making 
industry is due to peculiar advantages we 
possess, the principal of which is that Califor- 
nia-tanned buckskin is the best in the world, as 
is universally acknowledged. Most of the 
gloves manufactured here are made from this 
buckskin, and the market for them has extend- 
ed to all parts of the Union. The reason for 
the superiority of our buckskin is that our tan- 
ners employ the best-known method of tan- 
ning the skins. It was learned from the In- 
dians, and is a close imitation of their method, 
with some improvements. This is what gives 
to our buckskin the widely-known name, 
"California Indian-tanned buckskin." This 
process of tanning is much more depend- 
ent on the climate for its success than would 
ordinarily be supposed. An even temperature 
and mild weather is especially desirable, and on 
this account the business has been much more 
successful in this city than elsewhere. One 
firm, employing 50 hands, is now engaged ex- i 
clusively in tanning glove leather and dressing 
the various kinds of furs used for trimmings 
and linings. This tannery alone turns out 
about 100,000 buckskins, 6000 sealskins and 
5000 dogskins every year. From one-third to 
one-half of this amount is sent to Eastern 
manufacturers, and that business is rapidly in- 
creasing. In one shipment made to the East 
last spring there were 100,000 pounds of buck- 
skins. The principal reason for the popularity 
of California buckskin iB because it is thinner 
and softer than the Eastern oil-tanned buck- 
skin. In the latter process lime is employed, 
which makes the leather thick, thereby detract- 
ing from its wearing qualities and adding to 
the clumsiness of the gloves. Attempts have 
been made in the East to tan buckskin by the 
California process, but with very incjifferent 
success. The leather is never so pliable and is 
harsher to the touch. It seems as impossible 
for Eastern tanners to equal our buckskin as 
it is for American tanners to equal the superior 
glove-kid leather that is imported from France. 
The constantly increasing popularity of Cali- 
fornia buckskin is proved by the advertisements 
of Eastern manufacturers who all claim to make 
their gloves of genuine California buckskin. 
This is true even in New York, where most 
of the gloves are made. Consumers in those 
States soon learn of the superiority of our 
leather, and invariably call for gloves made 
of it. 

All Aboard for Chicago !— The last carload 
of citrus and other fruits for the display at 
Chicago was started from Sacramento attached 
to the overland train on Thursday of last week. 
The Rdcord-Union says there was a large num- 
ber of people at the depot to witness the de- 
parture. The shipment was accompanied by 
P. E. Piatt, J. J. Morrison and R. B. Blowers, 
directors of the Citrus Eftiir Association, who go 
to conduct the Chicago Citrus Fair, in connec- 
tion with E. J. Gregory, who left for the East 
on Monday evening, and D. N. Honn, of Red 
Bluff, and Mr. Cutter, of Oroville, who were to 
follow on Friday or Saturday. At Auburn the 
train was greeted by the firing of guns, music by 
the brass band, the waving of torches and trans- 
parencies, and cheers from the assembled pop- 
ulace. The demonstration was intended as 
a compliment to Mr. Morrison in particular, 
and to cheer and stimulate the committee in 
general by assuring them of the people's inter- 
est in their mission. 



Wholesale Engine-Building . — The Bee of 
the 24th ult. states that the Southern Pacific 
Company has ordered the construction in its 
Sacramento workshops of 37 engines, some of 
which are to be 19x30 and others 20x30— the 
largest-sized engines in use. Their construc- 
tion will coat more than $450,000, which amount 
will be expended principally among Sacramento 
workmen. These engines are for use on the 
Oregon & California, California & Oregon, and 
other Southern Pacific roads, and work upon 
them will be begun at once. There are now 
nearly 2000 men employed at the shops in Sac- 
ramento, and there is a great quantity of work 
on hand. The construction of 37 additional en- 
gines will give employment to many more men 
and add vastly to the already large sum paid 
out monthly by the company. 



^NTOMOLOGKaAb. 



Worms in the Apples. 

Editors Press: — It is a good time now to 
talk about the codlin moth. The past year has 
been noted for the abundance of this insect 
nearly all over our State. Some of our horti- 
culturists in Santa Cruz county had a pet theory 
that this moth would not flourish so near the 
sea, or in our peculiar climate, or for some other 
mythical reason. That theory has been ex- 
ploded. In Ventura county they have another 
theory, the smell of coal oil which comes from 
the submarine oil springs is supposed either t.o 
kill or prevent these insects from spreading. 

In our neighborhood an experiment has been 
tried. An orchard, isolated, about one mile 
from other trees, in which the insect had be- 
come very abundant, was cleared entirely of its 
fruit in June, when it was supposed the eggs 
were all hatched and the worm securely in the 
apple. It was thought that this would make a 
clean sweep of the animal, and quarantine after- 
ward would prevent its reintroduction. This 
was done on the theory that the codlin moth 
can only live on the apple, pear, and fruit of that 
kind. 

Who can enligtiten us on this point ? I have 
an idea that the codlin moth cannot be disposed , 
of in that way. While there are wild roses, 
manzanitas, and other plants in the woods that 
bear fruit similar to the apple, may not this in- 
sect forage on them ? 

Again, the means of transportation of the 
codlin moth are so numerous that quarantine is 
very difficult. They may be carried in an old 
coat, or wrapping; about goods, furniture, trees, 
and a thousand other ways. In fact it is strange 
they have not spread more rapidly. And I 
fancy if we depended alc^ie on our intelligence 
and skill in trapping, destroying, and prevent- 
ing them from reaching our orchards, we would 
be overrun and eaten up by the codlin moth 
larviB. 

But there are environments of seasons and of 
foes, that come to our aid, often when we least 
expect them. Standing on the plank sidewalk 
one early morning after a rain, I aaw swarms of 
winged insects (not codlin moths) coming out 
from under the boards. The air was full of 
them, flying and spreading in all directions. 
And while I stood considering the source, di- 
rection and destiny of these things, I noticed 
some small sparrows coming out of the garden 
near by and raiding the insects. 

The sight was suggestive; for only a little 
while before the gardener had been shooting 
these birds because they plucked a few cherry 
blossoms for the honey they contained; and 
later when his apples were grown, behold ! they 
had worms in nearly every one. 

May it not be that one bird will destroy more 
codlin moths in one day than two hired men ? 
And suppose the birds destroy some fruit — 
that is not half as bad as a worm in each apple. 
Santa Cruz. C. L. Andebson. 



Remedies for the Codlin Moth. 

Editors Press: — I would like to give two 
remedies for the codlin moth, and if used as di- 
rected am sure it will clear an orchard of those 
pests. I have used them both in Pennsylvania, 
and think they will work fully as well in Cali- 
fornia. 

The first is: One tablespoonful of Paris 
green to two gallons of water (or about one 
pound of the same to 45 gallons of water). It 
is beat to use the small quantities, as they can 
be mixed better. The trees want to be sprayed 
when the fruit is set and about the size of a 
pea, and before the calyx turns down. The 
wash is perfectly harmless, as the growth of the 
fruit and the winds throw it off before the 
fruit is ripe. It will prove of very little use if 
used at any other time than above stated, and 
one application is enough. 

The other remedy is to make a strong solu- 
tion of tobacco water, and to every five gallons 
add one-fourth pound of whale-oil soap, and 
after spraying the fruit and foliage, wash the 
trunk to the ground. Afte/ the last rains paint 
the trunk with a solution of cow manure and 
sulphur mixed in the tobacco water. This 
serves as a preventive in keeping the larvee from 
climbing up the tree. This latter remedy is as 
good as Paris green, if used as directed. 

The method for making tobacco water is to 
put the stems into a sack and pour boiling 
water on and let it stand in a barrel for a few 
days before squeezing out. James O'Neil. 

Haywards, Dec. 20th. 

Our venerable friend and correspondent, 
John Taylor, of Mt. Pleasant, favored us with 
a call in person not long ago. His agricultural 
and ethical contributions from Tuolumne 
county these many years have made him as 
a familiar acquaintance to the readers of the 
Rural. He bears the recent demise of his 
wife with the resignation of a Christian and 
spiritual philosopher. Since our issue for De- 
cember 25th went to press the mail has brought 
us some sweet and kindly Christmas thoughts 
in his handwriting, which we have on file 
against the return of the holiday season. 



10 



fACIFie f^URAb f RESS. 



[Jan. 1, 1887 



. BlUIT CDaF^KETING. 



The Fruit Problem. 

Editobs Press: — Since you have so kindly 
opened the colutnna of yonr paper for the can- 
did discussion of the problem of Eastern ship- 
ment of fruit, I will give a few of my ideas. Of 
course, we will now have plenty of prophets 
who will point their finger at the Union and 
exclaim: "I told you so. I knew it. I told 
you that the California Fruit Union would be a 
failure," who, at the same time, never did any- 
thing to encourage or favor the Union, bat have 
done all they could to antagonize the Eastern 
shipper and the producer, and the result has 
been a disastrous season to the fruit industry. 

We opposed the Union from the start. But, 
as it was, we submitted cheerfully to the voice 
of the convention, and joined hands in good 
faith with the Union; took stock and shipped 
the first 4000 boxes of early apricots and 
peaches through the Union to Chicago. While 
shipping through the Union was satisfactory to 
some, to many it was not. 

That some other plan must be adopted is evi- 
dent to all. Just what that plan is, no one 
seems able at present to explain. We heartily 
indorse the auction plan for selling our fruit as 
the next experiment, and would recommend 
Porter Bros. Company as the commissioned 
agent for Chicago. 

That the IS-oar train was wrong, everybody is 
now ready to admit. That it was the death- 
blow to the fruit market, no one pretends to 
deny, and so will the 10-car train prove dis- 
astrous to the fruit industry. To furnish even 
10 cars of green and perishable fruit when the 
mercury is standing at 110° in the shade, the 
producers or shippers are compelled to crowd 
in fruit that is too green, fruit that is too ripe, 
fruit that is too small, fruit that is picked in 
the heat of the day and packed when it should 
not be, in order to make up the train so the pro- 
ducer or shipper might have the benefit of the 
reduction — the train rate. (I know of my own 
personal knowledge that shippers bought and 
shipped fruit that was not fit to feed to hogs so 
as to make up the train.) 

Many producers shipped much inferior fruit 
under the impression that they could make it 
pay at the 15-car train rate. Hence the great 
quantity of poor stuff sent East the past season. 
To make up a train of 10 cars, 10 tons to the 
car, 200,000 pounds of green and perishable 
fruit would be gathered promiscuously and 
thrown together in the shade, rushed and 
thrown on a market after a nine-days' journey. 
How much better will the 10-car train be than 
the l.'j-car train ? Just one-third, no more. 
Many of the producers preferred to pay §600 per 
car the past season and have their fruit go 
when it was ready and go on passenger time, 
than wait and ship on the fruit train at $300 
per car. If this proves anything, it proves 
that what we want and must have is a uniform 
rate on fruit, whether for one car or for 10 cars. 
The question is asked, how are we to obtain 
from the railroad the proper concessions ? The 
easiest thing in the world ! Let the fruitmen 
unite, and, like old Gen. Jackson, swear by the 
Eternal that they will neither ship nor sell to 
any man one pound of green fruit to be shipped 
over the railroad till they give the shipper and 
producer a reasonable reduction on fruit and 
move the fruit as it should go, one car or a 
dozen cars, at a uniform rate. Can it be done ? 
Certainly it can. Did not the canners a few 
years ago combine and form an exchange to rob 
the producer of his fruit ? They were not 
willing to pay even a living price — in fact they 
would not offer anything. They knew it was aper- 
ishable product and set a snare, but were caught 
in their own trap. A few of the leading apricot- 
growers in this early locality just quietly 
bought material, made trays, and when the 
'cots were ripe, went to drying. The canners 
kept still, took a walk each morning down to the 
store — but no apricots. The mercury rose to 
112"; still no apricots. The canners now got 
uneasy and rushed up here, glad to pay two 
cents for 'cots. So ended the Exchange. And 
now, after years of planting out multiplied 
thousands of apricots, thousands of young trees 
having come into bearing, the canners have 
come and contracted with four of our largest 
apricot-growers for their crops at two and 
three-eightbs (2|) cents per pound for five 
years, delivered at depot. 

Can the railroad be brought to time ? Cer- 
tainly they can. Don't you know the soul of 
the corporation lies in their pockets ? Touch 
that and you touch them where it hurts. 
There have been 100 cars of gieeu and perish- 
able fruits shipped this season, at $600 per car, 
or $60,000; there have also been .300 cars 
shipped, at $.300 per car, or $30,000, making 
the nice little total of $150,000, while the pro- 
ducers and shippers, as a rule, have lost money 
or not received a cent net proceeds. Relieve 
the corporation's pocket of this enormous sum, 
and if it doesn't regulate the fruit and accommo- 
dations, nothing will. However, before adopt- 
ing my plan, I would suggest that the commit- 
tee appointed by the fruit-growers at Sacra- 
mento secure from all the leading shippers their 
account sales received from the East this sea- 
son, lay them before Mr. Stanford and the rail- 
road magnates for their examination, and if 
they dou't move the soul of the corporation, 
nothing but my plan will. Then let the pro- 
ducers unite and swear by the Ecernal that 



they will neither ship nor sell, to be shipped 
over the railroad east of the mountains, one 
pound of green fruit till proper reductions are 
made on rates for moving our fruit; it may be 
that this and this only will do it. 

We will now notice the sixth paragraph of 
Mr. Weinstock's preamble; also the third para- 
graph in his resolutions — not that we desire to 
criticise, but that we condemn them as being 
impossible to carry out. Here is the sixth 
paragraph of his preamble: " The need of 
proper inspection at this end of the line, vast 
quantities of inferior and imperfectly packed 
fruit having been permitted to go East, thus 
not only causing its owners serious losses, but 
also depressing the price of such good Cali- 
fornia fruit as happened at such time to be in 
the same market." And here is his third reso- 
lution: "That said management also estab- 
lish regulations to control the quality, the 
weight and the manner of packing all fruit 
offered for Eastern shipment, and that its in- 
spectors reject such fruits submitted for ship- 
ment as do not come up to the established re- 
quirements." 

That sounds well, and looks nice on paper; 
but it is one of the impossibilities to carry it 
out. And I, for one, am glad of it. What 
right has any man, because he is more fortunate 
than I in obtaining fine fruit, to say mine shall 
not go into the same market to compete with 
his? No, sir! every man must and will ship 
whatever he wants to, and of just such quality 
as he has. That is every man's right. It is 
my privilege, and so it is every other man's 
privilege, to ship green fruit, ripe fruit, large 
fruit or small fruit. There is such a combina- 
tion of difficulties in these two paragraphs that 
they must be left entirely to the producer and 
shipper. His gains and losses will regulate 
him in the quality and quantity as well as the 
packing. There is but one kind of fruit that 
can be condemned — that is, fruit that is over- 
ripe and leaking at the time of shipping, and 
likely to injure other fruit. And that must be 
done by the parties loading the car, and not 
the Exchange — which should have nothing to 
do with it. What right has any exchange or 
set of men to say how my neighbors and I 
shall pack our fruit, or what kind of fruit we 
•hall ship ? That must be left to the pro- 
ducers and the local organizations. 

What ! talk about condemninR my fruit be- 
cause it is not packed right? Why, even Por- 
ter Brothers and Mr. Earl don't know it all. I 
knew good fruit packed by their orders, every 
apricot wrapped in separate paper; and when 
it arrived in Chicago, only five days en route, 
every box was rotten, more or less, in the cen- 
ter of the box. Then I knew a Pike county 
Missourian who packed his apricots in a small 
20-pound box without even a piece of paper, 
and they arrived in Chicago in splendid condi- 
tion. Now I claim that both modes of packing 
are correct, and yet they are directly opposite 
to each other. Who shall be the judge whe- 
ther the fruit is wrapped or not ? The man 
who owns the fruit. The trouble is, the Un- 
ion, or Exchange, wants to do too much. We 
must clip its wings and not let it soar too high. 
Let us come down to good, practical, common - 
sense business. What we want, and no more, 
is a well-regulated plan for moving our fruit 
when it is ready to go. There are two cen- 
tral ideas that should be kept in view by the 
Exchange: Firsts a well-regulated and practi- 
cal plan to move the greatest amount of fruit 
at the lowest possible freight rates; second, it 
should open up the most extensive market it 
could, then leave the local organizations to ar- 
range the minor affairs, giving every member, 
shipper or producer all the privileges that an 
Exchange could. 

We submit the following resolntions, having 
embodied those of Mr. Weinstock that we 
could indorse and added others that practical 
experience has proved must be added to and 
carried out, though they are in a crude form 
and subject to amendment: 

Jiesolved, That the fruit-growers, in State Con- 
vention, do hereby modify the by-laws of the Cali- 
fornia P'ruit Union, so as to embrace the following 
resolutions, namely: 

1. That all persons raising or shipping fruit for 
Eastern market be eligible to membership. 

2. That such association, through its manage- 
ment, appoint a commissioned agent, in every town 
and city, that can use a carload or more of Califor- 
nia fruit at a time. The commissioned agent shall 
be a commission merchant. 

3. That the commissioned agent or commission 
merchant receive his pay out of commissions on 
produce consigned to him. 

4. That each and every market be open and free 
to each and every member of the Exchange, whether 
producer or shipper. 

5. That all subscribers to the California Fruit 
Union, with all the other subscribers, shall have the 
right to reserve the privilege to sell to whomsoever 
they please. 

6. That members of the Exchange shall have the 
privilege of naming points of destination for their 
fruit; but all fruit sent through the Exchange must 
be sent to the commissioned agent, who is a com- 
mission merchant. 

7. That all shippers, shipping through the Ex- 
change, shall have the right to say how their fruit 
shall be sold by the commissioned agent, either by 
commission or by auction. 

8. That the auctioneer's charges be paid out of 
the commission allowed the commissioned .-igent. 

9. That there shall be one general manager; that 
he shall he located at Sacramento; that all cars or- 
dered by any member of the Exchange shall be or- 
dered through the general manager; and that the 
general manager shall be notified, at the time of or- 
dering car, of us destination. 

10. That it shall b? the duty of the general mana- 
ger to provide cars for the Exchange. It shall also 



be his duty to cause to be placed on a bulletin 
board, at every shipping point, each and every 
morning, the number of cars ordered the previous 
day and their destinations. 

11. That it shall be the duty of the general man- 
ager to ascertain the freight rate per car for green 
fruit from Chicago to New York; also to Boston, to 
Philadelphia, St. Paul, Cincinnati, and every other 
city where the Exchange has appointed one com- 
missioned agent, and to have all the rates of freight 
from Chicago to the other cities printed and kept on 
the bulletin board, at each and every shipping 
point in the State where a member of the Exchange 
resides. 

12. The general manager shall ascertain the 
length of time required for a car to go from Chicago 
to New York, also to any other city where the Ex- 
change has a commissioned agent. It shall be his 
duty to have the time printed and placed on bul- 
letin boards, as the freight rales are at every ship- 
ping point where there is a member of the Ex- 
change. 

13. That the general manager shall act as secre- 
tary for the Exchange. That there shall be no sal- 
aried offices, except the general manager and direct- 
ors. 

14. That no producer nor shipper that doe.«; not 
belong to the Exchange shall have the privilege of 
the reduction of rates granted to the Exchange by 
the railroad. 

15. That the commissioned agent of the Union 
in every city shall telegraph to the gener.^1 manager 
in Sacramento every day the price of California fruit 
in his city, specifying each kind of fruit; that the 
general manager shall cause such information to be 
daily posted on the bulletin board in every shipping 
point whence there has been a carload of fruit 
shipped. 

In behalf of our resolutions, they tie no man's 
hands, they take no market from any one, they 
give every man the same privilege. The small 
producers have the same privilege and same ad- 
vantage that the large producer has. The un- 
fortunate man with poor fruit can send it, pro- 
viding he pays freight and expenses on it. All 
markets are open alike to producer or shipper; 
every member can ascertain, by going to bulle- 
tin board, where every car is destined, and can 
select his own market. If we understand the 
object of the Exchange or Union, it is not to en- 
rich a few, but to find a market for the surplus 
of California fruit. In other words, we must 
have the utmost possible reduction in freight, 
that our fruit may reach the markets where 
multiplied thousands of hungry people are ready 
to consume it at a living price. 

Winters, Dec. 10, ISSG. G. W. This-sell. 



Mr. Weinstock Proposed for Manager. 

Editors Pres.? : — It is a fact generally con- 
ceded by all the stockholders, in order to pre- 
serve the existence of the Fruit Union, a gen- 
eral reorganization of its system and officers 
will have to be effected. With this object in 
view, we beg of you to give publicity to the in- 
closed from Mr. H. VVeinstock, who, after 
urgent solicitation, has agreed to serve us as 
manager, and, we think, as president too, as 
the two offices should be combined, with a 
board of advisors composed, as he states, of at 
least a minority of shippers, as the last season 
has more than proved to us that their co-opera- 
tion is necessary to success. It would occupy 
too much of your space to attempt to give the 
many reasons why Mr. Weinstock should be 
placed in this position, as the letters he has 
published and the explanations of his proposed 
plans made at the horticultural meetings at Sac- 
ramento expose a part and parcel of what will 
be introduced at the semi-annual meeting of 
the Fruit Union, to take place the 20th of Jan- 
uary, I8S7. After diligently searching the 
whole list of stockholders, we find no one more 
capable for the position. R. H. Chinn. 

Vacaville. 

Mr. Weinstock's Letter. 

Sacramknto, Dec. 13, 1886. 

Mr. R. H. Chinn. Vacaville— \>v.\v. SiR; Your 
favor of the 12th inst. is here. In response permit 
me to say that I trust I merit the compliment your 
letter contains. I certainly do feel a deep interest in 
the future welfare of Cahfornia fruit culture, not 
alone as a grower, but also as a business man and 
citizen. I know of no other industry upon which 
the future prosperity of our State so much depends, 
and I know of no other industry that has such ex- 
cellent prospects before it as California fruit culture, 
provided the markets of the East are properly de- 
veloped and controlled. 

Regardmg the question of officers for the Union, 
I fully real ze the grave importance of making wise 
and judicious selections. The best systems that 
man can devise will miscarry and prove of no avail 
if executed without juflgment or intelligence. 

At present I am rfot prepared to suggest names 
for the positions of president and n)anager of the 
Union, as I do not know enough about the business 
capacity of the stockholders generally to warrant an 
intelligent opinion. I have been strongly urged by 
members of the Union to allow my name to be used 
in connection with the position of manager. I know 
of no work that I would perform with deeper in- 
terest and with more pleasure. Notwithstanding 
all the difficulties and obstacles that are sure to arise 
in the carrying out of the plan advocated, I have so 
much confidence in its merit that, with a unity of 
action between growers and shippers once estab- 
lished, I feel morally certain that the plan can be 
made much more successful, the markets of the East 
greatly enlarged, and the returns to shippers and 
growers more largely increased than by any other 
system hitherto attempted. But I am so situated 
that at present I do not see how I can do the work 
justice without doing serious injustice to other large 
business interests to which my time and energies 
rightfully belong. 

Regarding the selection of directors, I would sav 
that if a unity of action between growers and 
shippers is secured, it would be very advisable 



that the shippers have a fair representation on the 
Board, for the following reasons: First, because, 
as a rule, they are business men of wide experience. 
.Secondly, they represent large interests and ship by 
far more fruit than even the largest grower. Thirdly, 
because they are thoroughly familiar with the East- 
ern market, the methods of packing, shipping, dis- 
tributing, etc., and, as members of an advisory board, 
their knowledge and experience will he of much 
more value than that of an average grower. And 
lastly, I favor some shippers being selected as di- 
rectors because it would bring more harmony and a 
better feeling between what last season were con- 
tending factions, and, if possible, would identify 
more closely the interests ot grower and shipper. 

.■\s to which of the shippers shall be selected for 
directors, I am not prepared at this writing to say. 
Personally, I have no preferences to express. But 
since they nearly all can be named on the fingers of 
one hand, and since all of them are well and more 
or less favorably known among the growers, it can 
be no difficult matter to select the best from among 
them. 

1 shall always be pleased to hear from you. Very 
truly yours, H. Weinstock. 



What tlie New Yorkers Think of It. 

New York, Dec. 27.— H. S. Dewey, of the 
winehouse of Dewey & Sons here, in an inter- 
view to-day regarding the high prices charged 
for California grapes in this city, said: "There 
is really no reason why we should not have the 
beautiful Flaming Tokays and Black Hamburgs 
retailed all through the season, from 12 to 1.5 
cents per pound. Some man with push and 
energy could take hold of the enterprise, organ- 
ize it properly and make a fortune out of it, 
while supplying the public with the best and 
most healthful fruit that grows." 

Mr. Everett, of the fruithouse of Miles & 
Everett, said: "The trouble is that there is 
no organization in the business. At present 
there is no one in the market who buys Califor- 
nia grapes outright and sells them at reason- 
able advances. All grapes sold here are handled 
on commission, at every step of the way, from 
the grower in California to the hawker on the 
streets. Some commission man in San Fran- 
cisco takes grapes to sell for what he can get 
for them, returning a certain percentage to the 
grower, who sends them on similar terms to 
some big commission-house in New York. The 
big house then turns them over to the little 
houses, and the little houses in small lots to the 
hawkers, and every time they change hands an 
increased sum is fixed, which must be returned 
by the persons who take them. In this way it 
happens that the lowest price for a carload of 
California grapes in fair condition in New York 
City is eight cents per pound. That rate, it 
may be thought, would leave a margin for 
great profit in handling the fruit, but every 
man who sells, all the way back to the commis- 
sion-bouse in San Francisco, has to allow a per- 
centage for somebody else; so there is not much 
profit in the business, and prices are inevitably 
high. Furthermore, the number of growers in 
California who are willing to let their fruit go 
on the commission system is small, and for the 
risks of business they must demand a rate equal 
to four or five times what they would sell at for 
cash. Let a company be organized, which will 
keep its agents among the California vineyards 
supplied with funds and ready to buy on the 
spot with cash; then let the grapes be brought 
here by quick freight and sold directly to re- 
tailers. There will be not only an enormous 
{^fit in it, but a business far beyond that done 
by the largest commission-house in New York 
during the season." 

New York, Dec. 28. — In an editorial on the 
California fruit crop, the Herald says: The 
Herald offers its congratulation to the (xolden 
State, the picket guard of the Republic on the 
West. We drink her wine, eat her grapes and 
admire her energy and patriotism. 



^LORieUbTUF^E, 



Notes on Roses, Etc. 

Editors Press: — It is with pleasure I no- 
tice the inauguration of a " Floral Exchange " 
through the medium of your valuable columns, 
and hasten to assist in the good work by offer- 
ing a share of my modest garden for exchange. 

There are, every planting season, hundreds, 
yes, thousands of plants uprooted and discard- 
ed from overstocked gardens throughout the 
State, which, could they be transplanted in 
ones less well stocked, would prove a mine of 
beauty to many of " ua flower-lovers." 

Now, Mr. Editor, there is only one way in 
which this thing can be accomplished, and that 
is for every one to coma forward and send in 
his little Hat. I would not object to sending 
a big list, but if every one sends even a small 
one it will be the cause of transferring a large 
amount of beauty from one portion of the 
State to another. 

The clipping submitted by your correspond- 
ent from San Mateo county, on the subject of 
rose pruning, is evidently written with the idea 
in view that the roses were on their own roots 
and not budded as most of the roses sold in our 
California nurseries are. It would certainly be 
a questionable proceeding to prune budded 
roses so severely as to send out shoots from the 
roots. 

The advantage of a budded rose lies in the 
fact that, in our climate, you can make a tree 
of most any of the good growers; hence you dq 



Jan. 1, 1887.] 



pACIFie I^URAb f RESS. 



11 



not want shoots from the roots. On the other 
hand, roses on their own roots are easily man- 
aged, as they do not require so much care to 
produce bloom; but cannot be maintained as 
" standards " so readily, on account of their 
tendency to throw up shoots from the roots. 

It would be quite disheartening to find your 
Marechal Neil producing choice Castilian or 
your Wm. Francis Burnett producing day 
roses; the latter phenomenon would not be so 
surprising as the former. Kolla Butcbek. 

Santa Clara, Cal. 



Exchanges. 

Rolla Butcher, Santa Clara, will exchange 
from 26 to 50 named chrysanthemums, comprising 
a choice assortment of Japanese, Chinese, anemone 



The Latest Fashions. 



Ladles' Toilette. 

In this instance the toilette is pictured as made 
of a soft, warm cloth, showing a stylish mixt- 
ure of several colors. The drapery entirely 
covers the four-gored skirt and is unique and 
stylish in effect. On the left side gore is ar- 
ranged a panel that is hemmed at the bottom 
and has seven deep tucks formed in it, each 
tuck being surmounted by a row of fancy but- 
tons. The rest of the skirt is covered nearly to 
the belt by a kilted drapery that has a deep 
hem and two deep tucks at the bottom, the 
plaits being quite wide and all turning one way, 
except the one nearest the left aide back seam, 
which turns forward over the seam. A jahort 




LADISS' TOILETTE. 



flowers and pompon from Hallock & Thorpe, the 
great chrysanthemum growers, for an equal number 
of named chrysanthemums of other varieties or 
roses. Also a fine lot of carnation slips, pelargo- 
nium, myosotis, pyrethrura roseum, helianthus multi- 
flora, plena, cobea scandens and a small lot of cos- 
mos, and this latter is a fine autumn flowering 
plant, for dahlia tubers, bulbs of named lilies, 
tigridias, and named pelargoniums and carnations. 
List of chrysanthemums given on appplication. 

Belle Ames, Sebastopol, Sonoma county, offers 
cuttings of roses, Prairie Queen, Baltimore Belle, 
Souvenir de Malmaison; and wants in exchange cut- 
tings of Gen. Jacqueminot, Catherine Mermet; Bon 
Silene, La France and Marechal Neil. 

Mrs. Julia Wightman, Booneville, Mendocino 
county, will exchange double white and pink holly- 
hock seeds, cuttings of Ampelopsi^ Veitchu, passion 
vine, Gen. Jacqueminot, Bon Silene. and Lord 
Macaulay roses, 10 varieties of chrysanthemums, for 
any of the following: Marechal Neil and Andre 
Schwartz roses, variegated and silver-leafed gera- 
niums, and any double gerinium, fuchsias, double 
and single varieties, or any very choice named 
roses. 



Our Agents. 

Odr Frisnds can do much in aid of our paper and the 
cauae of \>ractical knowledge and science, by assisting 
Agents in their labors of canvassing, by lending their in- 
fluence and encouraging favors. We lutetid to send none 
but worthy men. 

JARBD C HoAo — California. 

G. W. Inoalls— Arizona. 

E. L. Richards— San Diego Co. 

R. G. Huston— Montana. 

Gmo. McDowrIjL— Fresno and Tulare Cos. 

J. C. SwRENRY — Sonoma and Mendocino Cos. 

O. F. Berquan — Yolo and Solano Cos. 

U. S. Pruib— £1 Dorado and Placer Cos. 



round tahlier is arranged on the gores, and its 
pretty draping is made by plaits at the belt and 
in the side edges. The upper-back drapery 
reaches nearly half-way down the skirt and is 
tucked and hemmed to correspond with the 
lower drapery, and its top is laid in kilt plaits 
and gathered, the result produced at the back 
being that of two deep flounces of about even 
depth. The basque is narrowly double-breasted 
and closed in the regulation style, with 
button-holes and buttons. The basque is short- 
eat at the closing and square at the lower edge, 
and back of the closing it is somewhat deeper 
and falls in a point at the back edge of each 
side back. The center backs fall in two nar- 
row tabs that are hemmed at the bottom and 
have two tucks made above the hem. The 
center and side back seams, under arm gores 
and double bust darts perform the fitting. The 
coat sleeves are ornamented at the back of the 
wrists with a row of three buttons. The collar 
is high and in standing style, and linen collar 
and cufiFs are worn. For tailor costumes the 
mode is simple yet stylish, and will be devel- 
oped in all kinds of cloths, the smooth, rough, 
lined and checked varieties being all favored. 
Camels-hairs, serges and woolens of all season- 
able varieties are also effective made up in this 
way, and the panel may be made of contrasting 
goods if a combination be desired. Bead trim- 
ming, cord, pipings, etc., will often edge the 
plaits at the left side and in frout, and may also 
edge the tucks and the tahlier. In the event of 
such a decoration being chosen, the edges of the 
basque will be finished to correspond. 



A Blessing. 

Nothing adds more to the security of life, of 
happiness, and of health, than a safe and re- 
liable family medicine. S. L. R. has won for 
itself the appellation of "the family blessing." 
If a child has the Colic, it is sure, safe and 
pleasant. If the father is exhausted, over- 
worked, debilitated, it will restore his failing 
strength. If the wife suffers from Dyspepsia, 
Low Spirits, Headache, it will give relief. If 
any member of the family has eaten anything 
hard to digest, a dose of the Regulator will 
soon establish good digestion. It gives refresh- 
ing sleep even in cases where narcotics have 
failed. It is a preventive, perfectly harmless, 
to begin with, no matter what the attack, it 
will afford relief. No error to be feared in ad- 
ministering; no injury from exposure after 
taking; no change of diet required; no neglect 
of duties or loss of time. Simmous Liver 
Regulator is entirely vegetable and is the purest 
and best family medicine compounded. J. H. 
Zeilin & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., sole proprietors. 



HALL'S 

SARSAPARILLA 

Cures all Diseases originating from 
a disordered state of the BLOOD or 
LIVER. Rheumatism, Neuralgia 
Boils, Blotches, Pimples, Scrofula, 
Tumors, Salt Rheum and Mercurial 
Pains readily yield to its purifying 
properties It leaves the Blood pure 
the Liver and Kidneys healthy and 
the Complexion bright and clear. 
J. R. GATES & CO. Proprietors, 

417 Sansome St. San Francisco 




NEW 

FOP. l2rS7_c^l 

iS"Our New Catalogue for 1887, mailed free on appli- 
cation, contains description and price of Vegetable, 
Flower, Grass, Cliver, Tree and Field Seeds ; Australian 
Tree and Shrub Seeds; native California Tree and Flower 
Seeds, Fruit Trees, and m^ny new novelties introduced 
in Europe and the United States. 

THOS. A. COX & CO., 
411. 413, 415 Sansome St., San Prarclsco. 



PIANOFORTES. 

T-NEQUALLED IN 

Tone Toiidh Workmanship and Durability. 

wii^i^iam: knjlbe <fe co. 
Nos. 204 and 206 West Baltimore Street, Baltimore. 
No. 112 Fifth Avenue, New York. 



AGENTS 

WANTED 

to sell the 

MSSSOURI 

-STEAM- 

WASHER 




Active, honest persons all over the 
country, with or without team. 



[Extracts from Report's o/ Purchasers.] 

MART J. TAPPAy. RrrxOLDS, Nkb.: They txce\ all other wanhorfl I ever 
B&w. JOHN R. PODGE, JR., Nobmai-. Ill,: The heat machine tver invcn (e.l 
by man, H. H. DURANT, Cottagbvillb, B. C: Everybody likts tbem and 
e.verybody nanU them, 

S- B. ADAMS, Ai^fiTO!!, D. T.: My wife would n"t Uke a quarter section 
(16fl acrea) of land for her miicbine, if she could not ire( another. 

MRS. JOSEPH SWIFT. Statb Csntib. low*.: The most itaeful article 
abotit the kitchen. ANNA RAMSEY, Milford, Tbx.: Hnve IhorouRbly teatod 
it on articles from laoe oollara to bed quitta; ^ves entire satisfaction. 

ST. CLAIR INKSTER, JR., Eotpt, WABniNOTfi!* Tir.: Sellc itself an<1 can 
Dol bo spoken of too highly. JOHN DETTON. Bricham Citt, Utah.: Uavo 
fiveo it several severe toils ami it camo out triumphant every time. 

JNO. U. WHEELER. KANiia City. Mo.: They have proved treasures to 
the fumilies who secured Uiem. A. P, BHIVELEY, Toano, Nsv.: Gives entire 
satisfnotion. Rather handle tho Wisher than Rnvthini; I have seen. 

E. M. MASSEY, Lockport, Tent*. Has proved a better Waeher than I ever 
thou^lit would be invented. JOHN C. EVANS. Stoctianu, Mo.: If you 
will gft ui) any instrument that will take as much labor off of men as tliid 
Wjvsh^r taliD^ off the women, and coat no more, I could sell one at every hnuse. 

MUS, M. C. DOBBINS. Calpwill. N. J.: Gives perfect eati -faction . I do 
my washin; alonn in same time I used to with hired help. MRS. M. MOORE, 
Newtane. Vt.: Will do mnre thiln it aaya, esrefially washing flnnncls. 

MRS. F. G. 8INDEN. Siisrman, N. Y.: Would not take 860 for mine if 
I could not Kot another. Washes quicker and bettfer than it can be done hy 
hai.d. MRS. FRED. H. HARRIS, Brattledoro. Vt : la all that is claimed. 
Would not be without one for twice its price. MRS. ISAAC B. POND. 
Horthfield, Conn.: Have use! it nearly four months. Am pcrfeerly Hatixflod. 
1 freely recommend it to all housekeepers MRS. MARY E. VAIL. PiTOK*. 
lu, : Saved me t.*J.1,00 per year for 18 months I've had it. 

MRS. C. W. TALCOTT. NoaTnpuLn, Conn.: I have IhorouehlT test*-^ It 
for Ave months with entire satisfaction. EDNA J, HI'NT, Stanton, Wicii.: 
1 bad rather give up mv .trrii-f cow than part with mv Washer. 

I will Ahip n Hnmple thoNe dcHlrlnir nn nsrcnry 
on n week'f* Irlul <»n Ubcrul terms. A tnoiiHuiMl per 
<*(*nt ttit' hont wanher In the world for Huvlnif labor, 
<>lotht'M Hiid t»oiip. PavsenpnHU' uarcntM BHJ MONF \ . 
Write for partleulurPi. Addre«N J. WOlCTII. Kox 
mu Leulih JUo.; or Box li^Gfi, San FruDclnco, €aL 



SPKCIAIi OFF£R. 

I will ship, in localities where, as yet, I 
have NO acient, 1 sample "New Becker" 
Washer and "Empire" Wringer at whole- 
sale prices. E. W. MELVIN, Prop'r, 
Office, 80G J St., Sacramento, Oal. 




mm 



BUSINESS 
eOLLEQE, 

S4 Post St. S. F 

Send for drcolar. 



h^k apd baiikiiig. 



GRANGERS' BANK 

OF CALIFOROTA. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Authorized Capital, - • $1,000,000 

In 10,000 Shares of $100 each. 

Capital Paid up in Gold Coin, $645,360. 

Reserved Fund and Paid up Stock, $21,1 78. 
OFFICERS: 

A. D. LOGAN President 

I, C. STEELE Vice-President 

ALBERT MONTPELLIER Cashier and Manager 

FRANK McMULLEN Secretory 

DIRECTORS: 

A. D. LOGAN, President Colusa County 

H. J. LEWELLING Napa County 

J. H. GARDINER Rio Viita, Cal 

T. E. TYNAN Stanislaus County 

URIAH WOOD Santa Clara County 

J. C. MERYFIELD Solano County 

H. M. LARUE Yolo County 

I. C. STEBLE San Mateo County 

THOMAS McCONNELL Sacramento County 

C. J. CRESSEY Merced County 

SENECA EWER Napa County 

CURRENT ACCOUNTS are opened and conducted in the 

usual way, bank books balanced up, and statements of 

accounts rendered every month. 
LOANS ON WHEAT and country produce a specialty. 
COLLECTIONS throughout the Country are made. 

promptly and proceeds remitted as directed. 
GOLD and SILVER deposits received. 
CERTIFICATES of DEPOSIT issued payable on demand. 
BILLS OF EXCHANGE of the Atlantic States bought 

and sold. ALBERT MONTPELLIER, 

Cashier ana Manager. 

San Francisco, Jan. 15, 1882. 



THE GERMAN 

Savings and Loan Society, 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital and Deposits, Julyl, '86 
$13,826,466. 

LOANS MADE ON REAL ESTATE IN 
THE COUNTRY 

AT LOWEST MARKET RATES. 

MONEY TO LOAN 

ON 

COUNTRY REAL ESTATE 

AT REDUCED RATES BY THE 

SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
619 Clay St., San Francisco 
i^Blank Fomis of Application. ^ 



^Ijcatiopal. 



California Military Academy. Oakland, Cal. 




Special Feature— Commercial Department. Next Term 
begins Monday, January 3, 1887. Send for circular. 

COL. W. H. O'BRIEN. Principal. 

THE OAKS, 

171x0 H o yn o !S c Ix o o 1 , 

OAK ST., OAKLAND, CAL. 

Departments — English and Classical, Modern Lan- 
guages, Drawing and Painting, Music and Physical Cult- 
ure. Lessons, private and classes. 43^The Next Term 
will begin on VVednesday, January 5, 1887. 

MISS L. TRACY, formerly of 629 Hobart St., recently 
of 1825 Telegraph avenue. 

STOCKXOIS 
• Telegraph, Institute 

■Hd^-edd •»"<» 

NORMAL. SCHOOL. 

Open day and evening for --vf 
both sexes. Expenses less C//0^ 
than one-half the usual \(^'^ "^^^i^t-fj-'t-^ 
rates. Excellent board in e 
private families from $8 to $10 per month. Ad. 
■'rfs.s. for College Journal and Circulars, 
J. C. BAINBRIDGE, Principal. Stockton. Cnl 



MISS BISBEE'S 
SCHOOL FOR YOUNG LADIES 

AND LITTLE GIRLS 

Will Re-open in tbe New Building, 
7th Ave. and 16th St., East Oakland, 

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 5, 1887. 



12 



f> ACIFie I^URAb f RESS. 



[Jan. 1, 1887 



Land; ht ^ale aiid Jo Let. 



$10.00 PER ACRE. 

On the C. P. R. R., in Placer county; one half mile 
from Applegate; one lialt hour from Auburn; fine cM- 
mate; plenty of water; school, postofBce and telegraph 
near; way terms; title perfect. Apply to 

8. C. 08B0EN. 
ADPlegate, Placer Co., OaL 



A NEW COLONY 

On the new extension of Southern Pacific Railroads, 
on the lands belonging to R. T. BUELL, Esq., near Los 
Alamos, Santa Barbara county, Cal. Parties desiring to 
visit the property now, oan go %ia San Luis Obispo and 
take the cars froin thence to Los Alamos, thence by stage 
to the Colony. 20,000 acres of the best lands in Cali 
fornia, subdivided into 20, 40 and SO acre farms; $20 to 
830 per acre. INTERNATIONAL IMMIGRANT 
UNION. 401 California St., San Francisco. 



A Great_Bargain! 

A Remarkable Chance Offered. 

1 24 acres of as good Fruit Land as there is in this 
State. About 40 acres improved and a good Orchard on 
it Also two tracts of 160 and 166 acres each. Title 
guaranteed. Homestead and a pre-emption. The right 
to the two latter tracts will be relinquished. These 
pieces lie right in the mountains, and 20(1 acres can be 
cultivated when cleared up. There is plenty of good 
timber valuable for shakes, posts, or pickets; 1000 Inches 
of the best water in the world for drinking and irrigating 
puriwses; plenty of fish, deer, grouse, and bear. Also, 
10 miles of the best mountain range for stock in the 
Northern part of the State. Twenty-five miles from the 
railroad and seven miles to the nearest village. A good 
price can always be obtained for produce; never less than 
2 or 2i cents per pound for potatoes. Water free on all 
the land. 

Correspondence invited. Apply soon. Address, Ranch 
Owner, Box 2361, S. F. 



Farmers and Travelers 

Sojonming in Marysville will find the Western Hotel the 
best in the city, being clean, quiet, comfortable and reason- 
able in prices. Geo. Wappel, proprietor. 



FRES NO COU NTY. 

BRIGGS' SELMA TRACT. 

This most desirable tract, comprising 1280 acres of first-class gray ash 
and sandy loam land (situated one and one-half miles from the fast-grow- 
ing town of Selma, the second in the county, and two miles from Fowler, 
both being S. P. R. E,, town.s), has been subdivided and will be sold in 20, 
40, 60 or 80-acre farms. The distributing ditches are now being constructed, 
and convenient roads are laid ofi. The main canal is 60 feet in the bottom. 

THE WATER RIGHTSj 

Consist of stock in the canals and entitle the owner to one-eighth of 2 feet 
6 inches of water, being 2^ times the usual amount supplied to colonies. 
The owner of the water stock has a pro rata vote in the management of the 
canal, and the expense per year Ls about S3. 50 on a 20-acre lot. 

A school-house is to be erected on the land this year, and it has two 
within two miles of it at present. Fresno, Selma, Fowler and Kingsburg 
are good local markets for produce. Opportunities to labor with or without 
terms are abundant, and land can be rented for wheat-growing in the neigh- 
borhood. The health of this region is perfection, and, in common with the 
plains generally, is an excellent sanitarium for persons affected with pulmo- 
nary and rheumatic complaints. 

The best raisins in the world, wines unsurpas.sed, the finest grapes, the 
best peaches, apricots, plums, prunes, nectarines, figs and olives, and in fact 
all the choicest fruits and vegetables of the world are grown in this favored 
region. Raisin vines three to six years old yield per acre from four to seven 
tons, and increase to eleven. Wine grapes three to six years old yield from 
four to eleven tons per acre. Alfalfa is cut from four to six times a year, 
and yields from one to two tons per acre at each cutting. 

Two good cows and 100 hens furnish more than half the living for a 
family, and can be kept, with a team, on three acres of alfalfa, the growth 
of which is incredible in this favorable combination of soil and climate. 

A comfortable house for a small family can be built for $150. 

The low price, taking into consideration water and transport facilities, 
should especially recommend this to seekers of homesteads. 

Price, $25 to $37.50 per acre, on very easy terms to actual settlers. 

^^For further particulars call on or address 
O. J. WOODWARD, Fkesno. Cal. L. SHARPS, Selma, Cal. 



WHAT 



TOKEN 



I 

SHALL 



I BUY? 



■ ■ ■ — 



WHITE. 



SUPERBLY CONSTRUCTED. MAGNIFICENT INLAID FINISH. 

THE MOST BEAUTIFUL, 

THE MOST DURABLE, 

THE MOST COMPLETE 

SEWING MACHINE 

EVER MANUFACTURED. 
Solid * Soxxsllole! S-ULlostAXXtla,! S 

i»'See It before you select your holiday presents. If there la no Agent In your 
Town, call on or address 

WHITE SEWING MACHINE CO., 108 & 110 Post St., S. F. 



The New Cast AJAX TINNERS' SHEARS. 



Kxt ri'iimly I>ow 



Cutting eddfes, 
2 inches; edj^es 
chilled and hard 
as steel, equal to 
the best steel 
_ _ goods in cuttin}^ 

Price, 50 ctB. each. ^^^^^^ qualities. 

poBtage. 16 ct,. QSBORN & ALEXANDER, 

Uechanlcit' Tools, Hardware and Machinery, 
628 Market St., San Francisco, 




COMMERCIAL HOTEL. 

A. & J. HAHN, Prop'ro, 
No*. Z7S, 276, 277 and a Main Street, Stooktoh, Cal. 
Rates, fl.SS to $3 Per Day. 

Stage ofBces (or CollegeviUe and Oakdale, Roberta and 
Union Islaodg, and I a..e'B Mineral Springe etagea. The 
most desirable location In the city. Befurnished and refit- 
ted in the best ftyle (or the accommodation o( the public 

TUp in l>e<^lth,habite and disease. All breeds 

I ML. uuy and treatment; 50 cuts; 250. ThU office. 



WEST COAST LAND CO. 



SAN LUIS OBISPO, CAL. 



Incorporated March 27, 1886. 



CAPITAL, 



$500,000. 



DIKECTORS. 
Geo. C. Psrkins, 
John L. Howard, 
Isaac Ooldtrks, 
R. E. Jack, 
C. H. Phillips. 



OFFICERS. 
John L. Howard, President. 
Isaac Goldtrki!. Vice Pres't! 
E. E. Jack, Treasurer. 
C. H. PHILLIPS, 

Secretary and Manager. 



THE PASO ROBLES, SANTA YSABEL, and 
EUREKA RANCHES, 

Recently purchased by the West Coast Land Company, are now offered (or sale in sub- 
divisions. 

This immense body o( land, including 12,000 acres unsold o( the Huer Huero ranch, 
belonging to C. H. Phillips, comprises 64,000 acres o( rich, virgin soil. It lies in a compact 
body, in the center of San Luia Obispo county, and is within (rom 9 to 20 miles of the sea 
coast. It is covered with white and live oak timber, is one o( the most picturesque bodies 
o( land in the State, and re(|uires 

NO IRRIGATION. 

It has an abundance of living water, and where not sufficient (or domestic use, good 
water can be htd at a depth o( (rom 10 to 40 (eet. It has an average annual rainlall o( 21 
inches, exceeding by six inches that o( Santa Clara county, one of the most prosperous 
counties in the State. 

The extension of the Southern Pacific Eailway from Soledad 
southward traverses these lands for 15 miles throughout their 
entire length, placing the property within eight hours of San 
Francisco. 

Theee lands are offered at (rem 810 to $30 an acre, and are all susceptible ol the highest 
cultivation. In salubnty of climate, productiveness of soil and location as to market, they 
are equal to lands in Los Angeles and other counties, which readily bring from $100 to t200 
and upward; and as to price and terms, offer the best inducements to those seeking homes 
on any part of the Pacific Coast Tlie survey of the 

PASO ROBLES RANCH 

Has been completed. The maps and catalogues are now ready, and will be sent free on 

application. 

This ranch, containing 20,400 acres, has been subdivided into 230 lots. It is 12 miles 
from the sea coast, and is 20 miles north and weet from San Luis Obispo city. 

This ranch was one of the earliest granted by the Mexican Government and having been 
held by the same party for over SO years, has never before been offered for sale. It consists 
exclusively of land o( the choicest character, and is second to none in the State for the pro- 
duction o( wheat, wine, fruits, raisins and olives. 

TITLE, U. S. PATENT. 
T 3E3 H. M S OF S ^ Xi :E3 . 

One-third cash; balance in 4 equal pa}ment« at 2,3, 4 and 5 years; interest, 6 per cent 
per annum. The mortgage tax paid by the mortgagee makes the Interest about 4 per cent 
net to the purchaser, A deposit of i2i will be re(|uired in all cases to cover expenses of gale. 

C. H. PHILLIPS, Manager, 
West Coast Land Co., San Luis Obispo, Oal. 

<rSend Tor Catalogue and Map. . 



MACHINISTMTTENTION! 

AN OUTFIT FOR A MACHINIST. 

Good Tools, Patterns and an Es- 
tablisbed Bosiness 

FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN. 

If applied for Immediately. 

Address, B. A. W., 
Care of this Paper. 




AMAGICCURE 



Hheumatlsm, Neural- 
gia, Pneumonia, Pa- 
ralysis, Asthma, Sci- 
atica, Qout, Lumbago 
and ueaftiess. 

Everybody should have it. 
G. Q. BURNETT, Ag't 

827 Montgomery St , S. F. 
Price, 11.00. Sold by all Drug 

gists. <VCall and see 
DB. CHAS. ROWELL. 

Ofpiob— 426 Kearny St, 
San Francisco. 



DEAFNESS 



Its causes, and a new and suc- 
cessful CUKE at your own 
home, by one who was deaf 
V twenty-eight years. Treated by most of the noted 
specialists without benefit. Cured hinuielj in three 
months, and since then hundreds of others. Full par 
ticulars sent on application. 

T. S. PAGE. No. 41 West 3lBt St, Naw York City. 




BROWNE'S 
SQUIRREL and GOPHER 
SMOKER. 

$100 Reward to any one 
who will produce one of 
equal merit at the same 
expense. 

It is the Cheapest, 

By more than one-half, of any other 
in the market. 

EVEKY ONB OUABANTEED. or 
money refunded. 1 am in every 
way responsible. Refer you to the 
Editor of this paper. 

Circular mailed free to any ad- 
dress. 

Srate, Country and Shop 
Rights for Sale. 

Address 
F. E. BROWNE, 



Patented March 23, 1886. 



Los Angeles. Cal. 



NATIONAL ASSURANCE OO., 

OF IRELAND. 

ATLAS ASSURANCE OOMP'Y, 

OF LONDON. 

BOYLSTON INSTJEANCE COMPANY, 

OF BOSTON, MASS. 

H. M. NEWHAT.L & CO.. 

GmULU, ASBKTB, 

809 & 811 Sansom* St., San FranolsoOi OaL 



Jan. 1, 1887.] 



pACIFie I^URAb f RESS. 



13 



€(l3UeATI0J^AL. 



School Library Funds. 

Editors Press : — The Committee on Educa- 
tion at the State Grange made the suggestion, 
presumably for advocacy before the next Legis- 
lature, that school " library funds " be made 
available, under certain restrictions, for the 
purchase of furniture and other uses, on the 
ground that moat schools have an adequate 
library, etc., and that other uses for the fund 
should be found. 

Let us look into the case a little. It may 
be, as the speaker suggested, that there are 
schools which have libraries suitable in every 
•way, but in 20 years' experience, 15 of them as 
teacher in our school system, the writer has not 
found one district with a library such as should 
have been provided by the fund expended, or 
even fairly suited to the requirements of a 
country district, and he further makes the as- 
sertion that in such districts, taking an aver- 
age, one-half of the fund is squandered; and, 
further, that, aside from a few series of stand 
ard literary works, a few juveniles and works 
of reference, the selection of books is generally 
pernicious. 

As regards apparatus, a better state of aifaira 
exists. The frequent changing of teachers, the 
large percentage of inexperienced teachers and 
ignorant and selfish trustees, are accountable 
for the situation in a great measure. 

The intent of the law, providing a library 
fund, was to provide instructive and interesting 
reading matter and apparatus for those who 
were unable to fully supply themselves, and, as 
in all such cases, the providing of suitable cases 
or receptacles for the books, etc., the ruling of 
the State Superintendent of Public Instruction 
to the contrary notwithstanding. 

County Boards of Education are authorized 
by law to make, and do adopt, list of library 
books, apparatus, etc., from which selections 
must be made by trustees. This law is univer- 
sally ignored and the fund is expended accord- 
ing to the intelligence, ignorance or cupidity of 
one or more members of the Board of Trustees. 
Let the suggestion of the speaker become a law, 
and the door would open for any use of the 
fund, and for every school that would first con 
sider the legitimate use of the fund, 20 would 
not consider it at all; the library would not be 
thought of till every other desired use of the 
fund was exhausted. 

The tendency of legislation is to specify 
every use for every fund, and, in certain cases 
even the time in which fixed portions of the 
fund may be used. It is generally admitted 
that such restrictions are wise, though occasion^ 
ally working hardships. 

Instead of trying to divert the library fund 
to other uses, would it not be well to enlarge 
its scope in its legitimate direction ? Cabinets 
of natural history specimens would be the best 
of all instructors, being but sample leaves from 
the book of nature, and in the hands of com 
petent teachers could be made of vastly greater 
use than libraries ate now. Such collections 
would at once cause the addition to libraries of 
botanical, entomological, geological and other 
works on natural history. Exchanges would 
be made between districts, remote and near, 
and the many pupils of the Normal school 
would see that its collections would soon be- 
come the most complete possible. That the 
making of such collections would be of the 
greatest educational benefit to pupils, no intel- 
ligent person will deny; but the advantage to 
the State would be vastly greater, not only in a 
knowledge of its natural history, but in the 
number of investigators it would be training to 
observe and develop its natural resources. 

I have spoken of competent teachers — there 
are hundreds of such in the State, but they can- 
not be expected to undertake and bear the ex- 
penses of such work. Country schools are al- 
lowed $500, or less, to each teacher, and when 
from this are taken the library fund, fuel, pen- 
cil, crayon, ink and other running expenses, be- 
side insurance, painting, repairs of building, 
fences, etc., the remainder will vary from 1.300 
to |400 to provide an eight-months' school. 

As an illrstration of benefits that would ac- 
crne to the State from such a course, let us re- 
fer to some of our insect pests. Does any one 
doubt for a moment that, had specimens of our 
insect enemies been properly placed in our 
country schools, they would have been recog- 
nized and attacked to far better advantage 
than they have, or that in many instances their 
ravages would have been nipped in the bud ? I 
have seen a statement that, in Germany, the 
Colorado potato- beetle was recognized and 
summarily squelched by this course, and that 
their schools are provided with complete col- 
lections of such noxious insects as are liable to 
cause trouble or be imported. 

I am glad to see a Grange official wake up to 
something that interests our schools. There is 
plenty of room for improvement in the country 
schools, and with a slightly increased outlay in 
teachers' salaries, to keep the better class of 
experienced teachers in the ranks, the efficiency 
of our system would be quadrupled. 

It would be well for Grangers to wake up, to 
discuss the country school thoroughly, try to 
make it more useful, and instead of wasting the 
school fund by mismanagement, as is now dpne 
to a far greater extent than the public has any 
idea of, strive to make your schools efficient. 

John Granger. 



John A. Logan. 

The death of General Logan reminds us that 
the group of distinguished men bom of our 
nation's great struggle has become very small. 
Lincoln, Stanton, Sumner, Wade, Wilson, 
Chase, Meade, Hooker, Thomas, Garfield, Han- 
cock, Grant and others have gone, and so small 
at last has this group become that upon each 
new invasion of death we all wonder if any one 
remains to be a golden link between the past 
and present. So rapidly have our noble chief- 
tains fallen into the tomb that many of the 
young men of to-day will only know their 
valiant services 'from the hearsay of history. 
Those who were fortunate enough to see Gen. 
Logan on his recent visit to this State may well 
be proud of the memory, for he was one of the 
illustrious group whose names are embalmed in 
history. 

The death of General Grant was not a sur- 
prise. From the hour it was announced that 
he was seriously ill till he breathed his last 
among the tall pines of Mt. McGregor, the prog- 
ress of the deadly disease was hourly tele- 
graphed all over the land. The nation almost 
stood in silence around the bed of the dying 
hero and listened to his calm, brave words. 
But the death of General Logan was sudden 
and unexpected except to a few intimate friends 
who were advised of his danger. Though 61 
years of age, he had the appearance of a man in 
robust health and the prime of life. His jet 



A Neglected Market for California 
Raisins. 

Editors Press : — Compelled by circum- 
stancea, I have been loafing around the streets 
of this city since 5:30 a. m. this morning. 
Ever solicitous for Californian interests, I stroll- 
ed round the groceries to take observations. I 
did not see one box of California raisins in the 
whole city. Only one grocery had a box of Cal- 
ifornia prunes in the window. All seemed to 
have Malaga raisins of at least two grades, be - 
sides seedless raisins or Sultanas. I note, also, 
that the Spaniards intend to hold the fort as 
long as possible. Their raisins are finer and 
better packed than any I had previously seen. 
The top layer is now packed, each separate 
berry pressed circular and placed in rows, as 
we pack cherries. The labels are more decora- 
tive than formerly, gay chromos of bull-fights 
with edgings of gold lace have replaced the old 
Arcadian lithographs. Surely here at our own 
doors it would be possible to get some grip on 
the market, especially with the suspicion of 
cholera, hanging round Spanish products, to 
work in our favor. 

I came over from the new Vancouver City, 
the proposed Pacific terminus of the Canadian 
Pacific Railroad, last night. There also is 
another market that might absorb largely of 
California produce. The railroad has not yet 
reached Vancouver; and the rising city was 
destroyed by fire June 13th. Already some 400 



List of D. S. Patents for Pacific Coar 
Inventors. 

Reported by Dewey & Co., Pioneer Patent 
Solicitors for Pacific States. 

From the official report of U. S. Patents In DiwiT ft 
Co. '8 Patent Office Library, 262 Market St., S. F. 

OR WEEK ENDING DECEMBER 21, 1886. 

354,691.— Saw .Setter AND Sharpener— J. P. 
Cobb, College City, Cal. 

354,703.— Shingling Seat— C. B. Huestis, 
Ukiah, Cal. 

354,654. — Sheet Metal Seaming Machine — 
Chas. Puddefoot, S. F. 

354,809. — Amalgamator— Rowe, Holmes & 
Weils, Eureka, Cal. 

354.873.— Cable Grip— C. T. Ryland, Jr., San 
Jose, Cal. 

354,667.— Motor — G. Sutro, S. F. 

NoTB.— Copies of U. S. and Foreign patents furnished 
Dy Dewey & Co. , in the shortest time possible (by mail 
or telegraphic order). American and Foreign patents 
obtained, and general patent business for Pacific Coast 
inventors transacted with perfect security, at reasonable 
rates, and in the shortest possible time. 




THE LATE SENATOR JOHN A. L06AN. 



black hair showed no touch of frost. His face 
was full and unwrinkled. There was a certain 
spring and elasticity of movement that indi- 
cated the unimpaired vitality of a vigorous, 
well-preserved manhood. 

Though Logan had for some time been a con- 
spicuous figure in the local politics of Illinois, 
he first came to the front as a national char- 
acter during the Civil War. No one un- 
trained in the military art made a better 
record. That he had the genius to command 
is the tribute of Gen. Grant, under whose eye 
the most of his gallant services were performed. 
At Champion Ilill he covered himself with 
glory. At the storming of Vicksburg he 
evinced the most deliberate courage. With a 
major-general's commission he was appointed 
by the President to the command of the 15th 
Army Corps on the death of McPherson. 

From the close of the war until 1871 he filled 
various positions of honor. That year he was 
elected United States Senator, and was serving 
his third term at the time of his death. In the 
last Presidential campaign he was second on the 
Republican ticket, and many of his friends and 
admirers predicted he would head the ticket in 
1888. Like most self-made men, Logan's mental 
powers grew slowly as the oaks grow. Perhaps 
his greatest intellectual achievement was the 
three-days' speech in the Fitz John Porter case. 
His work, " The Great Conspiracy," will be- 
come a standard in our literature. Senator 
Logan was a man of fine presence, magnetic, of 
indomitable will, a steadfast friend and a manly 
foe. He was extremely happy in his domestic 
life. On November 27, 1855, he married Miss 
Mary 8. Cunningham, a daughter of Capt. Cun- 
ningham, of Shawneetown, Illinois, a lady of fine 
culture, rare social powers, who always took a 
deep interest in her husband's career and did 
much to aid him. She is not forgotten by a 
grateful people in this hour of her greatest af- 
fliction. His loss is more than that of a great 
party leader; it is a national calamity. Perhaps 
there is no man in the Senate who will be more 
missed. 



houses demarcate a city that is no doubt des- 
tined to be another Pacific metropolis. Nature 
has provided an ideal site, and art (C. P. R. R. ) 
is profusely assisting nature. Already a Catho- 
lic church crowns the bight, and a large hotel, 
masonry and brick, shows its first story on the 
ridge's crest. 

Hotels, banks, stores and residences, some 
quite fine structures, are springing up rapidly, 
and there is a probability that the first cars of 
the Canadian Pacific R>iilroad will enter the 
town in a few weeks. Round-houses, work- 
shops and wharves of the Canadian Pacific 
Railroad will alone suffice to make a town of 
most creditable dimensions, and if our Fruit- 
growers' Union could send a drummer up this 
way, he would readily get orders for large 
quantities of California produce. Don't let us 
overlook near markets in our ambition to de- 
velop those wh ich are remote. 

Edward Berwick. 

Victoria, B. C, Dec. 10th. 



More Money for Your Work. 

Improve the good opportunities that are offered you 
and you will receive more money for your labor. Hal- 
lett & Co., Portland, Maine, will mail you, free, full in- 
form.^tion showing how you can make from $5 to 825 
and upwards a day and live at home, wherever you may 
be located. You had better write to them at once. A 
number have made over $50 in a day. All is new. Capi- 
tal not required; Hallett & Co. will start you. Both 
sexes; all ages. Grand success attends every worker. 
Send your address at once and see for yourself. 

Coneumption Cured. 

An old physician, retired from practice, having had 
placed in his hands by an East India missionary the 
formula of a simple vegetable remedy for the speedy 
and permanent cure of Consumption, Bronchitis, Ca- 
tarrh, Asthma, and all Throat and Lung Affections, also 
a positive and radical cure for Nervous Debility and all 
Nervous Complaints, after having tested its wonderful 
curative powers in thousands of cases, has felt it his 
duty to make it known to his suffering fellows. Actuated 
by this motive and a desire to relieve human suffering, I 
will send free of charge, to all who desire it, this recipe, 
in German, French, or English, with full directions for 
preparing and using. Sent by mail by addressing with 
samp, naming this paper, W. A. NOYBS, 149 Powers' 
Block, Rochetter, N. Y. 



Preserving Eggs. — The first prize on eggs 
preserved for three months at the London dairy 
show was won on a lot of eggs packed in sweet 
bran with the small ends down. The second 
prize lot had |been rubbed with a mixture of 
olive oil and beeswax and packed in coarse 
salt. The third prize lot had been rubbed when 
new laid with mutton dripping, and then put in 
powdered dry lime. All these were in good 
condition for cooking at the end of 90 days. 
According to Mittheilungen Landwirthichaft, 
vaseline is a good preservative for eggs. The 
eggs should be thoroughly washed and rubbed 
with vaseline previously melted with three- 
tenths per cent salicylic acid. The operation 
should be performed twice, the latter one month 
after the former. On boiling, the skin of vase- 



In the cure of severe coughs, weak lungs, spitting of 
blood, and the early stages of Consumption, Dr. Pierce's 
"Golden Medical Discovery" has astonished the medical 
faculty. While it cures the severest coughs, it strength- 
ens the system and punfies the blood. By druggists. 



For colds, fevers and inflammatory attacks, as well as 
for cholera morbus, diarrhoea, dysentery or bloody-flux, 
colic or cramps in stomach, use Dr. Pierce's E.xtract of 
Smart-Weed, composed of best Grape Brandy, Smart- 
Weed or Water Pepper, Jamaica Ginger and Camphor 
Water. 



Our Progress. 

As stages are quickly abandoned with the completion 
of railroads, so tlie huge, drastic, cathartic pills, com- 
posed of crude and bulky medicines, are quickly aban- 
doned with the introduction of Dr. Pierce's "Pleasant 
Purgative Pellets," which are sugar-coated, and little 
larger than mustard seeds, but composed of highly con- 
centrated vegetable extracts. By druggists. 



The Roller Organ.— The Roller Organ is one 
of the most melodious of the many modern auto- 
matic musical instruments of late introduction on 
this coast. Much ingenuity has been displayed by 
inventors who have sought to make an instrument 
which could be recommended as substantial and 
serviceable, but fine tone has always been the great- 
est desideratum in this class of instruments, and 
manufacturers have seldom been more than partially 
successful. In the Roller Organ, however, which is 
now being sold in this city by C. H. Hammond, 
General Agent, at 2224 Mission street, between 
i8th and 19th, and at io8 Third street, it is claimed 
that a combination of the three most desirable qual- 
ities in these instruments has been secured. It is 
apparently a compact and durable instrument, and, 
judging from the indorsement it has received from 
music-loving people, its tone is all that could be de- 
sired in such an instrument. The Roller Organ em- 
ploys no paper; but its music is obtained from a 
roller furnished with pins similar to those of a 
music box. These pins operate upon valve keys, 
made of hard steel, the roller being driven by suit- 
able gearing, which also works the bellows. All the 
working parts of the instrument are easily accessible, 
and are made of solid metal, the rollers and keys 
being mounted on iron castings, and the whole as 
durable and well made as the best sewing machine 
Nothing has been omitted to give this beautiful in- 
strument its crowning qualities of extreme simplicity 
and durability. The instrument performs all kinds 
of music — sacred hymns and popular songs as well 
as operatic selections, and has been strongly recom- 
mended for adoption in Lodges-where it is desirable 
to open aud close with singing, the organ being an 
excellent instrument for an accompaniment for the 
voice. The instrument is sold in this city by C. H. 
Hammond, General Agent. Depot, Eureka Bazaar, 
2224 Mission street, between i8th and 19th streets; 
also at 108 Third street. 

Don't Fail to Write. 

Should this paper be received by any subscriber who 
does not want it, or beyond the time he intends to pay 
for it, let him not fail to write us direct to stop it. A 
postal card (costing one cent only) will suffice. We will 
not knowingly send the paper to any one who does not 
wish it, but if it is continued, through the failure of the 
subscriber to notify us to discontinue it, or some Irre- 
sponsible party requested to stop it, we shall positively 
demand payment tor the time it is sent. Look cakkpullt 

AT TUE LABKL ON YOUK PAritK 



The advertisement of the old reliable establishments 
The .Storrs and Harrison Co., Painesville, Ohio, appears 
in this issue, offering flower and vegetable seeds, roses, 
plants, grape vines, fruit and ornamental trees. They 
are running one of the most complete nurseries in the 
world, and issue a large, attractive catalogue which they 
will mail you free, on application. They have no travel- 
ing agents, and are only responsible for orders sent direct. 
Give them a trial and save dealers' commissions. They 
guarantee satisfaction. 



✓ 



14 



pACIFie I^URAlo f RESS. 



[Jan. 1, 1887 



breeder3' birectory. 



8U linea or leas in tbia Directory at 60c per line per montli. 



POULTRY. 



H. J. GODFREY, San Leandro, Cal., Brst-class P. 
Kecks and Wyandotte eggs, *2 per setting; no circulars 



PABLO POULTRY YARDS, San Diego, Cal. 
Large establinhnient. Send for catalogue. 



W. O. DAMON, Napa, Wyandottes, W. and B. Ii«g- 
liorus, P. llocks, L. Brahmas, Pekin Ducks. 



MRS. M. B. NBWHALL, San Jose. Wliite and 
Brown Leghorns, Langslians, Plymouth Rock«, Light 

Brahmas, Pekin Ducks and Bronze Turkey s. 

JAS. T. BKO \V JN, Is^Ucorgia St., Los Angeles, Oal. 
Breeder of lliorouirhbrcd I'oultry of the leading va- 
rieties. Send for circular and price list. 



CHOIOB LAND AND WATER FOWLS for 
sale at all times of all the most popular and prohtable 
varieties. Please inclose sUmp for new circular and 

price list to K O. Head, Napa. Oal. 

L> MOKKIS, Sonoma, Cal. iSiolouse and Kmbden 
Geese, Bronze and W. Holland Turkeys, and all leading 
varieties of Thoroughbred Poultry. 



D H. EVERETT, 1818 Larkin St.,S. K., importer and 
breeder of Thoroughbred Laugshans and W yandottes. 
AXFORD'S IMPROVED INOUBaTOR.- 
400 e;,'g8, SjO; 150 eggs, Guarantee satisfaction. 

For particulars address, 1. P. Clark, Mayfleld, Cat 
jr N LUND, Box^lieTOakland, Cal. Wyandottes, 
Langshans, L. Brahmas, P. Kocks, B. Leghorns, R B. 
R. Game Bantams, T. Guineas, Hom'g AntwerpPigeons. 

D. D. BBlCiGS, Li>8 Gatos, Cal. Fancy Poultry^breeder 
O. J. ALBEE, Santa~ ~Clar a. Tlioroughbred poultry. 

E. C.^LAPr'. South" Pasadena, Cal. Light Bcahmas 
and Plymouth Kocks. No fowls for sale. Eggs from 
first-class stock, after Nov. 1st. 

CALIFORNIA POULTRY FARM, Stockton, 
Cal. Send 2-cent stamp tor Illustrated Catalogue. 



HORSES AND CATTLE. 



R. J. MERKELBY, Sacramento, brooder of Norman, 
Percheron Horses and thoroughbred Shortho rn Cattl e. 

Estate oT^MT E.rBRADLEY, Sau Jose, CaL, breeder 
of recorded thoroughbred Shorthorn Cattle and Berk- 
shire Ho gs. A choice lot of young stuck for sale. 

M. D. HOPKINS, Pctaluma, Cal. Jjistern Imported 
registered Sliurth<.ru Bulla^and Heifers for sale^ 

HOl-S fEINS, AAUGIli., JACOB ; NETHER- 
LAND and Artis strains; all ages; largest her 1 to 
select from. Young bulls, low. (Ad registered.) F. 11. 
burke, 401 .Montgomer y St., S. F. 

E. J. TUttNE k,TlJiiiater, Breeder of Percherou-Nor- 
inan registered ll.irses and Itoadsters. 



l!j W . sTE BiLE, San Luis Obispo, Cal., breeder of 
Thoroughbred Uulstein and Jersey Cattle. 



BETH COOli, Danville, "Cook Farm," Contra Costa 
Co., breeder of Aberdeen Angus, Galloways and De- 
vons (Kegistered). Young stock for sa^le^ 



PETER aAXli <& SON, Lick House, San Francisco, 

Cal Importers and Breeders, for past 16 years, of 

erj variety of Cattle, Horses, Sheep and Hogs. 

WlXiLxAM Nll-iES, Los Angeles, Cal. i'borougb- 

bred Poultry, Cattle and Hogs. Write for oiroular. 

J~. R.^OsjE, Lakeville, Sonoma Co., Cal., breeder ol 

Thoroughbred Uevons, Roadsters and Draft Horse s. 
THE BBcJT HlSctD^l?' JEKSEYa, allA. J. C. 

C. registered, is owned by Henry Pierce. San Francisco. 
P. H. MURPHY, Brighton, Perkins P. O., breeder of 

Shorthorn Durhams, and Poland-China Hogs. 

ONTARE RANCH, three miles west of Santa Bar- 
bara, Santa Barbara county, Califiiriiia. Coach Horses, 
Draft Horses, I'rutting Bred Horses and pure Uulstein- 
Friesian Cattle. Young cattle and matched teams 
always on hand. Francis T. Underbill, Proprietor. 
C. F. Swan, Manager. 



COTATE RANCH BREEDING FARM, Pages 
Station, S. F. n N. P. B. K. P. O., Penn's Grove, 
Sonoma Co., Cal. Wilfred Pago, Manager. Breeders 
of Short Horn Cattle, English Draft Horses, Spanish 
Merino Sheep and Berkshire Swine^ 

PTS. OHIIjES, Davisville, Yolo Co., importer and 
breeder of registered Shorthorns of the best families. 



STINSON ei MARSH, Dayton, Nevada. Regis- 
tered Shorthorns of choice breeding strains. 

TTprAT^lLLIAMS, Columbia, Boone Co., Mo., 
breeder and importer of thoroughbred Herefords. 



LEONARD BROS., Mt. Leonard, Mo., importers 
and breeders ot Galloway, Aberdoen-Angua and Short- 
horn cattle. 



HYDE <3i MOOKE, Visalia, importers and breeders 
of Shorthorn cattle. Young stock for sale^ 



J. A. BREWER, Centerville, Alameda County, Cal. 
Shorthorns and Grades. Young slock tor sale. 



SHEEP AND GOATS. 



I* U. SHIPPEE, Stockton, Cal., importer and breeder 
of Spanish Merino Sheep, Durham cattle, Jacks and 
Jennys li Berkshire Swine; high graded rams for sale. 

R. H. CRANK, Petaluma, Cal., breeder and importer. 
South Down ot Long John Wentworth herd for sale. 



E. W. WOOLSEY at aON, Fulton, Sonoma Co., 
imp'rs b'ders I'horoughbred Merino, 6l Jersey Cattle. 

EACiTON MlLJ-ib, LaKeville, Sonoma Co., thorough- 
bred Spanish Merino Sheep. Choice rams for sale 

J. B. UOYi', Bial's Landing, Cal., imporuir and 
breeder of Shropsliire Sheep; also breeds cross-bred 
Merino and Shropshire Sheep. Rams for sale. 



KIRKPaTRICK & WHITTAKER, Knight's 
Ferry, Cal.. breeders of Merino Sheep. Rams for sale. 

T. H. HARLAN, Williams, Colusa Co., breeder pure 
blooded Angora goats, & Merinos; young stock for sale. 



SININE. 



TYLER BEACH, San Jose, Cal., breeder 

thoroughbred Berkshire and Essex Hogs. 



ot 



REGISTEKBD BKRKSHIRBS, BLACK 

JACH, BESS and REDWOOD; imported 

Btraius; pairs and trios, not akin, at farmers' prices. 

Y'oung boars, low. F. H. Bu rke, 401 Montgomery St. 8.F. 
G flToT BEMBN r & SON, Redwood City. Ayrshire 

Cattle, Southdowu .Sncep, Berkshire .ind Essex Swine. 
WILLIAM NILB8, Lo8Angele8,Cal. Thoroughbred 

Poland-Oiina and Berkshire Pigs. Circul ars free 

JOHN RIDER, Sacramento, Cal. Breeder ol Thoi 

oughbred Berkshire Swine. My stook of Hogs aie all 

recorded In the American Berkshire Record. 

W713. RUCtiER. Santa Clara, breeder ol registered 

improved Pol aml China Swine. Pigs for sale. 

I. L. DICKINSON, Lone Oak Farm, Souora, Tuol- 

umne Co., Cal., breeder ot thoroughbred Essex Hogs. 

Pigs now ready tor sale. Prices reasonable. 



HOLSTBIN-PRIESIANS. 

STOP! THINK! INVESTIGATE 

The only Cow that has given 26,021 RiS. 2 ozs. of milk in a year. 
The only four-year old that has given over 23,000 lbs. in a year. 
The only two year-old that has given 18,4S4 lbs. la ozs. in a year. 
The only herd of mature cows that has averaged 17,166 lbs. 1 oz. in a year. 
The only herd of two-yi>ar old8 that has averaged 12,409 lbs. 8 ozs. In a year. 
The only two-year-old that has made 16 lbs. 9 ozs. ot butter in a week. 
The only herd in which two year olils have averaged over 11 lbs. each in a week. 
Twenty-three cows in this herd have averaged 13 lbs. 3 ozs. ot butter in a week. 
Also a tine stud of Clydesdale Stallions, Mares and fillies of all ages. 
Send for Catalogue giving full records and pedigrees. In writing always mention RuntL Pkbss. 

SMITHS. POWELL «i LAMB. Syracuse. New York. 



91 A R T I UK Z, 
O AI.. 



} ALHAMBRA POULTRY YARDS { 




JASPER J. JONES 
Proprietor. 

— BRKKDBR 01"— 

HIGH-CLASS POULTRY. 

Clean sweep on Plymouth Bock Chicks at 
Great California Poultry Show at San Francisco, 
Jan. 11th to 18th, 1886. Ihe Best is the Cheap- 
est. Illustrated Catalogue senttreeoo applica- 
tion; worth il to any breeder ot poultry. 
Send me your name on a Postal Card; 6000 
copies of fine DIuBtratad Catalogue (or tree 
distribution. 



GOLDEN GATE INCUBATOR. 

**^ffleeiiiir Im bc^lievinir,-* Partiea who couteiuplate using incutmtnra, or who have been unaueceasful iu their use 
or in the rearing of chickeuB. sbuuld iuapyct our iuculmtor aui.l brooding-house. This is the only satisfactory showing iu 
this period of distrust of incubators— a distrust bruu^ht about, for the most part, by cheap and inellicient contrivances fur 
the purpose. We have a long and strong list of recuiniuendations, with the written testimony of people who have made 
tlie largest average percentages you ever heard of; we have a large number of mecUls, diulomas and M hat-uot from various 
Fairs; we have the finest looking machine you ever saw, with a magnificent record of more than four years" duration- btit 
we are iiuiti- willing yon should discard all these weighty evidences after ouce seeing the daily hatching of our machine and 
the hnndreils of beautiful, strong and healthy >»irils. without vt-rmin or blcnii'ih, now iu our brooding-house. W<* iihow 
what w«» oan do, and you are cordially iiivit.-d to know what that im. It is worth your while to witness the re- 
sults of our more than six years' sncct-ssful rxpt-rirtai-. Hnjits from Sau Krancisco every half hour; fare, 15 centa. Large 
circulirs mailed free. O. U. IXCl'KATOli CO., KaMt Oakland. Cal. 



FRENCH DRAFT STALLIONS, 

Kentucky Jacks and Jennets, 
Work Horses and Mnlei 

FOR S.4LE. 

Some ot the Stallions were imported from Europe, 
others from Illinois, and some young ones were bred in 
Calilornia from imported stock. The prices will be less 
than animals of equal value can be purchased else- 
where. 

Call at or address Patterson's Ranch, Hueneme, Ven- 
tura County, or Patterson's Ranch, Grayson, Stanislaus 
County, or for further information call on or address 
JAM£S M. PATTERSON, No. 8 Davis St., San Francisco. 

JOHN D. PATTERSON. 



FOR SALE. 
HOLSTEIN-FRIESIAN CATTLE 

FKOM Tim HBRD OP 

HON. LELAND STANFORD, 
On his Ranch at Vina, Tehama County, Cal. 
For prices and catalogue address 

MR. ARIEL LATHROP. 
Room 69, C. P. R. R. Building, 

Cor. 4tb and Townsend Sts. , 

Ban Francisco, Oal. 



St|EEf> \HD Sl|EEf>Wi^8l|. 



Recommended by Professors Hilgard, Cooke, etc. 

Powdered Potash & Caustic Soda 

KILLS GOPHERS, INSECTS, Etc. 

Makes a pure Soap at a cost ot tl per 125 Iba. Send for 
directions to T. W. JACKSON & CO., 

804 Oallfornla St., S. F. 




Calvert's Carbolic 

SHEEP WASH 

$2 per Gallon. 

After dipping the Sheep, It use- 
ful for preserving wet hides, de- 
stroying the vine pest, and tor 
wheat dressings and disinfecting 
purposes, etc. T. W. JACKSON, 
S. F. , Sole Agent for Pacific Coast 



LITTLES 




SHEEP DIP. 

Price Reduced to 
$1.25 

PER GALLON. 



RED POLLED CATTLE. 

For Milk, Butter and Beet; of a beautiful red color; no 
horns for mischief; just the Cattle for the Farm, the 
Dairy and the Family. 

Imported, bred and for sale by 

L. F. ROSS, 
Send for Catalogue. Iowa City, Iowa. 



BADEN FARM HERD 
Of Short Horn Cattle and Dairy Cows. 

Catalogues and Prices on application to 

ROBERT ASHBURNBR, 
Baden Station, - San Mateo Co., Oal. 



ALHAMBRA POULTRY YARDS. 



JfeVaA'* 




JASPER J. JONES, Prop'r, Martinez, Oal. 

Veterinary Surgeon. 

Late Veterinary Inspector of Cattle for the State 
ot Kentucky. 

Operative Surgery and Treatment of 
Chronic Lameness Specialties. 

DR. 8. B. SWIFT, • . Ban Joie, Oal 



Twenty gallons of fluid 
mixed with cold water will 
make 1,200 gallons of Dip. 
It la BuperioT to all Dipa and Dressings tor SoAi In 
Sheep; Is certain Id effect; is easily mixed, and Is applied 
in a cold state. Unlike sulphur or tobacco, or other 

ftolsonons Dips, It Increaaes the growth of the wool, stlm- 
ates the fleece, and greatly adds to the yolk. It destroys 
all vermin. It is cflicacious tor almost every disease (In- 
ternal and external) sheep are subject to. 

FALKNER. BELL & 00-. 

San Francisco. CaL 



SEDGWICK STEEL WIRE FENCE. 




The best Farm, Garden, Poultry Yard, Lawn, 
School Lot, Park and Cemetery Fences and Gates. 
Perfect Automatic Gate. Cheapest and Neatest 
Iron Fences. Iron and wire Summer Houses, Lawn 
Furniture, and other wire work. Best Wire Stretch- 
er and Plier. Ask dealers ia hardware, or address, 

SEDCWiCK BROS., RICHMOND, Ind. 



OThe BUYERS' GUIOK It 
Issued Sept. and Slarch, 
each year. «*- 3ia pa{;es, 
Sl-^iliy^ Uielie»,wltli over 
3,500 lUiutratlons — a 
wbole Picture Gallery. 
GIVES Wbolesale Prices 
direct to eon»umer» on all goods for 
personal or family use. Tells how to 
order, and gives exjict cost of every- 
thing; you use, eat, drinlt, wear, or 
have fun with. These INVAJUIABLE 
Il(M)Ki> contain Information gleaned 
from the markets of the world. We 
will maU a copy FREE to any ad- 
dress upon receipt of 10 ets. to defray 
expense of maUlng. I*t us hear from 
you. Respectftally, 

MONTGOMERY WARD & CO 

827 Sc 229 WaJbaah Avenao, Chlcaco, U 



This paper Is printed with Ink Manufac- 
tured by Cbarlee Bneu Johnson St Co., 600 
South 10th St., Philadelphia. Branch Offl- 
oe8-47 Rose St., New York, and 40 La Salle 
St., Ohlcago. Agent for the Paciflo Coast— 
Joseph H. Dor«ty. 629 Oommerolal St. B.F. 



iNCllBiyjOI^S. 



THE PACIFIC INCUBATOR! 

Awarded the Gold Medal 
at tbe State Fair, Sacra- 
meiato, and at the Mechan- 
ii a' Institute Fair of 1884 
188.5 and 1880, over all com- 
petitors as the best machine 
made. It will hatch any kind of 
iigga better than a lien. 

Pacific Coast Agency for the 
celebrated Silver Finish Galvan- 
ized Wire Netting, The Wilson 
Bone and Shell Mill, and the 
American Heat Chopper. Poul- 
try appliances of every kind and 
every variety of Land and Water 
Fowl can be found at the Oak- 
land Poultry Yards, the oldest 
and largest establishment on the 
Pacific Coast. The Pacific Coast Poulterers' Hand Book 
and Guide; price, 40 cents. Sead 2'Cent stamp for illus- 
trated OO-page catalogue to the PACIFIC INOU- 
BATOR CO., 1817 Castro St., Oakland, Oal 





PEERLESS 
INCUBATOR 



THERE IS MONEY IN CHICKENS! 

The " Peerless " has the only Regulator 
that Eegolates the flame of the lamp. 
That it has no equal, seeing is believing. 

From five to fifteen minutes in 24 hours is all that 
necessary to devote to the machine. 

The "Peerless" has the best heater, the best self-egjif- 
moistener, and best pure air supplier of any machine 
manufactured. Its great and crowning feature is its 
automatic lamp or heat regulator. Its simplicity Is 
taking. Acknowledged to have no competitor, 

t^Send for circulars, etc. 

BIVEN & CO. 
Factory— Corner California and Lindsay 
Streets, Stockton, Cal. 



HATCH CHICKENS 

WITU TIIF. 

PETALUMA INCUBATOR 

THE MOST .SUCCESSFUL 
MACHINE MADE. 

Three Gold Medals, One Silver Med- 
al and Fifteen First Premiums. 

Pric • >-2o Hatches all kinds of Bsga 

Jti^rSend for lartr Illustrated Circular and see how yo 
may get AN I^•UUBATOR FKEE. Address 

Petaluma Incubator Oo., Petaluma, CaL 




MgiiSst^^ J,M HALSTED'i, iNCUBMt^! B 




mi 


1 THE MODEL. 

m S KCLIAtLC, 

AMD tlUPlt. 





The Halsted 

Incubator Co. 

1312 Myrtle St., 
Oakland, - - Cal. 

Price from $20 
up. Model Brooder 
from $5 up. 

Thoroughbred 
Poultry and Egga. 
Send for new (3r- 
culars containing 
much valuable in- 
formatien. 



ANGORA GOATS FOR SALE 

AT LOWER PRICES 
Than Ever Before on this Coast. 

Wishing to reduce my herd previous to the winter 
storms (because my buildings are not adequate to shelte 
them), I will sell 600 high-grade and pure-blooded 
Angora does in lots to suit purchasers, and at prices 
suit the times. 

JULIUS W STAND. 

Little Stony, Cal. 



JONESA POLAND CHINA FARM. 




BLIAS GALLUP, Hanford Tulare, Co., Oal. 

Breeder of pure-bred Poland China Pigs of the Black 
Beauty, Black Bess, Bismarck, and other noted famlUea. 
Imported boars King of Bonny View and Gold Dust at head 
of the herd. Stock recorded In A. P. C. R. Pigs sold at 
reasonable ratee. Oorrespoodenoesoliclted. Address as above. 




GRINDS 

^rafa 

$5 



j'oru OWN 

none, Jtleal, 

OvHlerShella, 

C^raham Flour & Corn, in tbe 

" " (F.W'ibwn'B 



HANDMILLSate-s^r 

KM) per cent, more made 



in keepins Poultry. Also I'OWF.H .>fII.L,8and 
PAKTyI FKKI> .>lllil.s. Circulanand teetimoniala 



Mt*^ appliutiob; WILiiU.N UUUI^. £a«toii. Pa. 



Are you using Welllngr- 
ton'glmprored Kgg Food 
for Poultry? Ir not, wut 
NOT? Every Grocer, Druggist 
and Merchant Sells thia Egg 
Food. 



n/%/\l/^ .Any Book, Paper or HaKazlne 
Killing furnish prom|itly at publisher's price. 
U W W 11%/ Order NOW for the Holidays. 

KAY TAYLOR.lE CO., Box SS2, OAKiaitD, CAI,. 




Jan. 1, 1887.] 



pACIFie I^URAlo f RESS. 



15 



?eeds, Want?, tic. 



CYPRESS AND GUM TREES. 

AU fresh, hardy, stocky trees. Monterey Cypress, 8 to 
12 inches high, transplanted in boxes of 70 trees each, at 
$2 per box or $25 per 1000; 12 to ir. inches, of 50 trees 
per box, at 34 per 100 or $35 per 1000. Seedlings, 3 to 4 
inches, at $5 per 1000. Blue Gums, 8 to 12 inches, of 100 
per box, at $1.50 per 100 or $14 per 1000; 12 to 18, of 70 
per box, at $1.50, or $20 per 1000; 18 to 24 inches, 50 per 
box, at $1.75, or $30 per 1000. Large, straight sacked or 
bulked Gums or Pines shipped only after the roots have 
sprouted through sacking. Blue, 4 to 6 feet, at $15 per 
100; 8 to 8 feet at $20 per 100; 8 to 10 at $25 per 100. 
Red or Round Leafed Gums, 4 to 6 feet, at $20 per 100: 
6 to 8 feet at $25 per 100. Pines, 2 to 3 feet, at $20 per 
100. Acacias, 2 to 3 feet, of 30 trees per box, or 3 to 4 
feet of 20 trees per box, at $2 per box. Also fresh- 
gathered, strong-growing seeds of the Monterey or 
Italian Cypress, Blue, Red or Iron Bark Gum or Acacia 
in variety at lowest rates. Postage Stamps taken for 
orders not exceeding .$2. No other than the best of 
stock will be sent from this nursery, as we desire to 
make a friend of every cash customer. 

GEO. K. BAILEY, Park Nursery, 
Berkeley, Cal. 



O. M. SILVA & SON, 

NURSERYMEN, 

Lincoln, Cal., and Newcastle, Cal. 

CUOICE STOCK OF ALL KINDS OF 

FRUIT TREES, SMALL FRUIT, 
PLANTS, Etc. 

McDevitt Cling Peach, Walling Plum, Botan Japan 
Plum, Coosa Nectarine, Chestnuts, Pomegranates, Mul- 
berries, etc. Fay's Prolific Currant, Hansell ajid Souhe- 
gan Raspberries, Balmont Strawberry, etc. 
/BTSbnd for Catalogue. Address 

C. M. SILVA & SON, 

Newcastle, Cal. 



H. H. BERGER & CO. 




Receive through season, by 
every steamer from Japan, 
best varieties of 

Persimmon, Orange, 
Plum and Mammoth 
Chestnut Trees. 

Rarest Ornamental 
Shrubs & Plants. 

Camellias, 1 to 12 feet high. 
Azaleas, Rhododendrons, Bam- 
boos, Magnolias, newest Chry- 
santhemums, Tree Poeonias, 
Koses. Send for our new Cata- 
ogue. P. O. Box 1501. 

Depot, 317 Washington St., 
Sm Francisco. 



B. V. CUTTINGS. 

I OFFER FOR SALE, AT $10 PER M.. 
200.000 CUTTINGS of the t«IIowing renowned 
varieties, tule packed, F. O. B. at depot: Cabernet Sau- 
vignon, ('abernet-Franc, Merlot, Verdot, Malbec, Tintu- 
ricr, Portal Ploussard, Mondenso, Petite Sirrah and 
Grosse Blue. Also from $2.50 to $.5.00 per M. all other 
well-known wine and table grape varieties, too numerous 
to mention. The above Grape Cuttings are from our 
vineyard, and we guarantee them true to name, healthy, 
in good condition, and offered at lowest market price. 
Ten (10%) per cent invariably in advance on small orders. 
Information furnished, if desired. Will not guarantee 
cuttings procuretl for accommodation from other vine- 
yards, hut will always select them from responsible par- 
ties and in healthy locations. The Burgundy and Bor- 
deaux varieties are very scarce, and parties desiring to 
plant this winter would do well to secure their cuttings 
at once, and save money and disappointment. 

J. B. J. PORTAL. 
Box 827. San Jose, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



I'll 



without wrltnlb Tor our Cntnli^ire. You want 
THE 1{E^^T. Ol^rices (Iffy af^ipetition, and 
SEEDS are rUKlL TESTJW), 1{EMAB1,E. 

CWT^ILU^JE-invttlu.ibletoall 
■ IX^B^H —of ^^12.5 PRK<'!«« including 

ROSES, PyKHjS, VINES, 
SHRUBjBf^REE^ FRUITS. 

Thr RAREJlTNEW. The Cr^lCEST OLD. 

S3d Year <00 Acres. 21 LargSilreenhonsi's. 

THE STORRS & HARRraflN CO. 

PAINESVIIiLE, LAKE COm^HIO. 



SAN LEANDRO NURSERY. 

FINE ASSORTMENT OF the LEADING VARIETIES OF 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES. 

The Hardy White Tuscany, Hardy Yellow 
Tuscany, Clingstone Peaches. 

LARGEST PEACHES IN CALIFORNIA. Splendid 
flavor; good shippers; excellent for canning. 
Gum and Pepper Trees in boxes. Flowers and Shrubs. 
aS"AII trees grown on new, rich soil, without irriga- 
tion, and are positively free from insect pests. 

G. TOSETTI, 
San Leandro, Alameda Co., Cal. 



1838. POMONA NURSERIES. 1886. 

A aiiperb stock of La>rsou best Early 
Market Pear, Kieffer best Late Markt-t 
Pear, Le Ooute and other Pear Trees. Wil- 
son, Jr., largest known Blackberry; 163 
bnshela per acre— 4i inches around. Erif, 
the largest very hardy Blackberry. Marl- 
boro and Golden Queen Raspberries. Parry 
and Lida, best Market Strawberries. Ni- 

. ^ _ acara. Empire State and other Grapes in 

S ^t^ l,^?;^^ large supply. AU the worthy old, and 
promismg uewlfruits. Catalogue free, WM. PARRY* 
Parry, M. J. 




33d 
YEAR 



33d 
YEAR. 



.[STOCKTON NUR8ERY.1 

WHITE ADRIATIC, 

SAN PEDRO, SMYRNA, and ENDRICH PIGS. 

Praeparturiens, Macrocarpa, Mayette, and Chaberte Walnuts, Chestnuts, Persimmons, Mulberries, Olives, 
Oranges, Lemons, Pears, Apples, Peaches, Apricots, Cherries, eto. Plums and Prunes on Myrobolan Stock, Grape- 
vines, Ornamental Trees, Shrubs, Palms, Magnolias, Clematis, New Roses and Hothouse Plants. 

TRY THE PERSIAN MULBERRY. 

NO SCALE. — I wish particularly to call the attention of Fruit-growers to this fact. I have repeatedly had 
my nursery examined by experts, and upon no occasion have they found any scale or any indication of scale. The 
nursery is isolated from orchards, both old and new, and as I take every precaution in importing new varieties to 
get only clean stock, I feel perfectly warranted in guaranteeing every tree sold by me free from scale and other 
pests that are proving so disastrous to the 'ruit interests of the State. Send for Cataloqub. 

E. C. CLOWES, Proprietor, Successor to W. B. WEST. 

Stockton, Cal., October 27, 1S86. 
This is to certify that we the undersigned have this day thoroughly inspected the Stockton Nursery; that we 
found DO Scale or indication of Scale, and that to the best of our knowledge and belief the Stockton Nursery is free 
of this dreaded pest. 

WM. H. ROBINSON, Quarantine Guardian San Joaquin Fruit District. 
JOS. HALE, County Commissioner of Horticulture. 



Fancher Creek Nursery. 

VALUABLE AND NEW 

PEACHES, NECTARINES, APRICOTS, PRUNES, ALMONDS, FIGS, OLIVES, POME- 
GRANATES, MULBERRIES, 

Japan Fruits, Grapes, Texas Umbrella Trees, Roses, 
Oleanders, Hedge Plants & Ornamental Plants. 

ADRIATIC FIGS. NEW OLIVES & SABALKANSKY GRAPES 

Pamphlet on Fig Culture, 10 cents. New Catalogue, containing full descriptions and guide for 
Amateur Rose-Growers, now ready. Address 



GUSTAV BISEN. Manager, 



FRESNO, CAL. 



FRUIT TREES!} Established isea {FRUIT TREES! 



THOS. MEHERIN, 

Agency of CALIFORNIA NURSERY CO., Niles, Alameda Co., Cal. 

We have now for sale at Lowest Market Rates the Largest, Best Selected and Healthiest Stock of 

Fruit Trees, Grape Vines, Olives, Small Fruits. Etc. 

Ever offered on the Pacific oast, including all the new varieties, all grown on new land at the above Nur- 
sery and free from scale and other pests. Samples of the trees always on hand. 



WB BAVE ALSO CONSTANTLT ON HAND A liARQR AND FKRSU STOCK OP 

Grass, Clover, Vegetable, Flower, and Tree Seeds, 

And Ornamental Trees and Plants, Bulbs, Rosea, Magnolias, Palms, etc., 
at LOWEST KATES. New Catalogue for 1887 mailed on application. 

P. o. Box 2059. THOS. MEHERIN, 516 Battery Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



TREES! TREES! TREES! 

BY THE DOZEN, 100, 1000, or 100,000. 



Our Stock this Season Cannot be Excelled on the Coast, 

Neither in quantity, quality, varieties, size of trees, nor for health and vigor of same. We offer $1 each for every 
scale bug found on our nursery trees. 

OUR PRICES ARE VERY LOW THIS YEAR. 

Send for our new and beautiful lithograph-cover Tree and Seed Catalogue. See in it description o 

OUR NEW TRAGADA PRUNE, 

The very earliest, good shipping Plum. There are fortunes in It. Also our new and fancy 

JAPANESE ORANGES, CAMPHOR TREES, TEA PLANTS, 

And other novelties. Our Seed Store carries an immense stock of Seeds of every variety at bottom figures, both 
wholesale and retail. 

Send for Catalogue; it is the finest in the State— an ornament to any parlor table. See our Stock, if possible, 
or write to us. Address 

W. R. STRONG & CO., 




What Mr. Beyer says:,;;^x 

beet thanks for the splendid seeds received from your firm. 
' would be a rather lengthy list if I should n.ime all, but 
will say th.itaraongstas first, and 3 second preminms 
awarded rae at our fairs in Northern Indiana and 
Southern Michigan, 28 first premiums were for vege- 
tables raised from your seeds. What firm can beat 
August Beyer, So. Bend, Ind. 
Seed of this quality I am now ready to sell to every one 
..ho tills a farm or plants a garden, sending them FREE my 
1,'etable and Flower Seed Catalogue, for 1S87. Old custo\ners 
d not write for it. I catalogue this season the native wild 
potato. JAS. J. H. GREGORY, Seed Grower, Marblehead, Mass. 



BURPEE'S 

■FFARM ANNUAL 

11887 



Win bp sent FREE TO ALL who write foi 
Bend nddrf"."* on postal for the most complete 
CATA LOGCE 
publUhptl, to 



W. ATLEE 



It is a Uaiiil^ome Book of 128 pp.. with hundreds 
of illustratioDS, 3 Colored Plates* and tells all about 

THE BEST 

GARDEN, 

FARM and >^|~r'|l>'^| Dl IIMTC 

flowx:r wbhbbvW/ rUHnlOi 

TlioroiiBbbred Stock and Fancy Poultry. It 
describes RAKE NOVELTIES in Vegetablesand 
FlowerH of real value, whlrh eaonot be obtalnet) eltewbere. 

BURPEE & CO., Philadelphia. Pa. 



it uoiorea I'laies, ana 

SEEDS, ''''' 



NAPA VALLEY_NURSERIES. 

leading Specialties for Season of 

X886-07 : 

CENTENNIAL CHERRY, 

MUIR PEACH, 

.LOVE-ALL PEACH. 

LEONARD COAT'ES 

(Successor to Coates & Tool), 
P. 0. Box 2. Napa City, Cal. 



GAREY'S NURSERIES, 

Successors to the O. W. Chllds Nurseries, 
LiOS ANGELES, CAL. 

FOR SALE, SEASON 1886-87, 

The largest, best grown, best rooted, cleanest, healthiest 
stock of Fruit Trees in Southern California, all true to 
label, consisting, as specialties, of Olive, Orange, Lemon, 
Lime and Bartlett Pear. Price List free. Address 
THOS. A. GAREY, Agent, 
P. O. Box 452. Loa Angeles, Cal. 



Champion of Oregon Gooseberry. 

The JEWETT NURSERIES call the attention of every 
fruit man in California to the merits of this justly cele 
brated fruit. It never mildews. Immensely productive. 
Large size; clear, transparent color. Undoubtedly the 
very best Gooseberry now grown on the Pacific Coast. 
Prices: One dozen, by mail, $1.50; 100, by express or 
freight, S4; 1000, by express or freight, $30. We have 
also, at low rates, a full line of Nursery Stock. Send for 
price-list. Address 

THE JEWETT NURSERIES, 

White Salmon, Washington Ty. 



PEPPER'S NURSERIES. 

ESTABblSIIED IN 1863. 

Apricot, Plum, Prune and Peach on Myrobolan Plum 
tocks. Bartlett, Winter Nelis, B. Clairgeau, B. Hardy 
and other varieties, 1 and 2 years. A full stock of 1 and 
2-year-old Apple Trees, Peach on Peach, Nectarine, 
Quince, Fig, Grape, Currants, Gooseberries, Almonds, 
Walnuts, Chestnuts, etc. Prices reasonably low. No 
scale bug. Also Myrobolan Plum and Pear Seedlings, 
home grown. Address W. H. PEPPER, Petaluma, CaU 

Home-Grown RYE GRASS SEED. 

In Lots of Half a Ton, at 10 cents 
per pound. 
JOHN W. FERRIS, 

Black Point, Marin Co., Cal. 
SOW EARLY. 30 lbs. to the acre. 



ALFALFA SEED. 



In carload or smaller 
lots. Fresh, clean, 
and free of foul seed. 
Also all varieties of Grass, Clover, Garden, Flower, and 
Field Seeds. Send for Catalogue and special quotations 
on large orders. W. R. SIRONQ & CO., Sacra- 
mento, Cal. 



DEL MONTE VINEYARD NURSERY, 

FRESNO, CAL. 

For Sale— White Adriatic Pig Cuttings of 

my own importation Grape Roots and Cuttings of 
Carignan, Mataro Grcnache, Teinturier, Trousseau, 
Carbenet Sauvignon, Malbec and Muscat Frontignon, etc. 

U. DENICKE. 



1,000,000 GRAPE CUTTINGS 

At $3 per M. 
Muscatel, Muscat, Sultana, Flame Tokay and Emperor; 
also Rooted Vines at $12 per M. 

OAK SHADE FRUIT CO., 

DavlsvlUe, Yolo Co., Cal. 



TroosJ Trees! 



Ti"c<3« : 



Fine assortment of the leading varieties at the follow- 
ing reduced prices, to the trade: 

20UO Apples 5 to 10c. 9500 Pears 5 to 10c. 

6700 Apricots 4 to 8c. 7800 Cherries 6 to 10c. 

7700 Prunes 4 to 8c. 2050 Peaches 4 to 8c. 

48U0 Plums 4 to 8c. 1000 Japan Plums.S to 12c. 

ALAMEDA NURSERY. 
A. Cleveland, • - Alameda, CaL 

TREETaND PLANTS BY MAIL. 

MEECH'S PROLIFIC QUINCE; LAW- 
SON, KIKFFEk, and LE CONTB PEARS; 
NIAGARA and EMPIRE STATE GRAPK- 
VINES, SOUHEGAN and MARLBORO 
RASPBERRIES. MAY KING and JEWELL 
STRAWBERRIES. A Complete Stoct of 
everything desirable to plant. Send Immediately for 
price list and circulars. Address, WEST JERSEY 
NURSERY CO., Bridgeton, N. J. 



FRENCH PRUNE TREES FOR SALE. 

For sale, about 2000 French Prune Trees, 2 years old, 
large, healthy trees, free from insects, at $50 per lOOO, or 
$5 per 100. Apply to B. SCHULTE, one-half mile west 
of Wayne (a local station 4 miles north of San Jose), or 
address P. O. Box 132, San Jose, Cal. 



100,000 Olive Cuttings for Sale. 

. AITLY TO 

C. A. BANCROFT, San Dlepo, Cal. 
Or to THE HISTORY CO., S. F. 



Large stock; fine plants; for the season of IdSG-ST. 
Address 

T. J. SWAYNB, National City or San Diego. 



s 



ibiey's Tested Seed 

Catalogue free on application. 
Send for it. 
HIRAM SIBLEY 4 CO., 
R0CBE3TEK, N. Y. & CniCAOO, ILL. 



s 



IG 



f ACIFie I^URAlo f RESS. 



[Jan. 1, 1887 



Note.— Our quotations are (or Wednesday, not Satur- 
day^ thd date the |>aper bears. 



Weekly Market Review. 

DOMESTIC PBODUOB. BTO. 

San Franci sco. Dec. 29, 1886. 

The past week has been interrupted by the Christ- 
mas festivities, consequently only such trading was 
done as is usual for the season. Absence of rains 
stimulited trading in feed cereals and hay. The 
rains of to-day have not, at this writing, disturbed 
values. The English wheat market has ruled strong, 
with a strong closing to-day, as follows: 

London, Dec 29 — Cargoes off coast, firm, await- 
ing arrivals. Cargoes on passage and for .shipment, 
firm, but of a holiday character. Cal. wheat off 
coast, 37s 6d to 37s 9(1. Cal. wheat just shipped, 
38s 3d. Cal. wheat nearly due, 37s gd. Liverpool 
wheat, spot, firm. Liverpool wheat, Cal., 755 J^d to 
7s 8Md. 

Forelen Review. 

London, Dec. 24. — The Afari Lane Express, 
which was issued to-day instead of Monday, the 
regular day of publication, in its review of the British 
grain trade for the past week, says: The wheat 
trade was limited, but prices were steady. Foreign 
wheat was quiet. The increase of American sup- 
plies tends to depre.ss the market, but the disturbed 
condition of affairs in the eastern pirt of Europe 
counteracts this influcnee and strengthens the mar- 
ket. There is a good prospect of increased business 
with the new year. At to-day's market the tone of 
wheat was firm. Flour was 6d dearer. Corn, bar- 
ley, beans and peas were steady. 

Eastern Wool Markets. 

Boston, Dec. 24. — Wool is firm, with a good de- 
mand. Michigan X, 32c |? lb; choice .Montana, 
25(3!27c; medium Wyoming, 23C@25c; finedo. 20@ 
22c; others unchanged. 

New York, Dec. 24. — Wool is generally steady. 
Domestic fleeces, 30@38c per lb; pulled, I4@38c; 
Texas, 9^250. 

New York, Dec. 26.— The markets here and at 
Boston and Philadelphia are quiet and practically 
unchanged. There has been a little more looking 
around by buyers and some increase in sales of 
small lots as samples. The indications are that the 
present situation will remain unchanged until about 
the middle of January. Considering the continued 
dullness of trade, holders have maintained their 
views with remarkable firmness. The sales of the 
week included 40,000 lbs of Western Texas, at 17® 
19c; 1000 lbs fall California, at 17c. In Boston, 
large lines of California wool are held above the 
market. Territory wools are quiet, though some 
large sales of Montana medium have been made on 
the basis of 60 cents for fine medium and 55 cents 
for medmm. Oregon wool is dull. Among the 
sales at Boston were 537,000 pounds Territory at 
21^25 cents, 35,000 pounds California spring and 
Oregon at private terms; at Philadelphia — 3000 
pounds Territory fine at 25 cents, 3000 pounds 
Oregon fine at 30 cents, 1000 pounds California fall 
at 15)^ cents, 9000 pounds Territory black at 22 
cents. 

New York, Dec. 28.— Wool is steady but quiet. 
Domestic fleeces are quoted at 30@38c, pulled 14 
@3SC, Texas 9@ 25c. 

Pbilaaelphla Martcet for California Prod- 
ucts. 

Phii..vdei,phia, Dec. 20.— Dried fruits are in 
eager demand and, with light supplies, it is a sellers' 
market. Fancy evaporated apples, I2@i2j^c; good 
to choice, io'A@n'Ac; prime to fancy sliced, 0% 
@7J^c; do., quarters, 4'A®s'Ac Fancy evaporat- 
ed peeled peaches, 27@28c; poor to choice, 25@26c; 
choice to fancy, sun-dried, I7@i8c. In California 
raisins the feeling is quieter on account of the heavy 
foreign invoice due New York for auction; nominal 
quotations continue $2@2.25 for Londons and $1.75 
@2 for L. M. 

Oranges are easier on account of the preponder- 
ance ol conmion stock and the late auction sales; 
such stock as had met regular private sales at $2.75 
©3.50 was knocked down at auction last week at 
$i.8o@2.7o— principilly $2.10^2.25. New Cali- 
fornia lima beans sell on arrival at Si.Sofei.go. 

The Chicago Fruit Market, 

Chicago, Dec. 24. — The dried fruit market is 
firm, and the arrivals continue light. No peaches 
are offered, for there were very few dried owing to a 
short South em crop this year. No offerings of im- 
portance were noted. California Dried Fruit — 
Raisins are easy, but other kinds rule steady. The 
trade is fair. Prunes, French, ^ lb, 9c; plums, 
pitted, i2c; peaches, quarters, 12c; halves, pared, 
350; nectarines, 9c; pears, 8@i2}^c; raisins, Lon- 
don layers, 20-lb boxes, box $i.75(a 1.80; raisins, 
loose Muscatel, |f box, $i.so@i.6a 

Dried Fruit in New York. 

New York, Dec. 26.— Raisins— Moderate job- 
bing demands have prevailed at easier prices. Of 
Cahforni I stock, at the auction sale on Thursday, 
only about 400 baxes were sold, the balance being 
withdrawn, owing to the low prices offered. Sales 
of California layer were reported at $i.i2M; do 
loose,"! 1. 12"4 ; do London, $i.6o@i,7s; do seedless, 
$1.10. Prunes, Turkish, are firm at 5)fc; French, 
slron g at 7K@8c for Go's and 90's. Currants are 
easier at 5H@5'Ac. Citron is selling at I7^@i8c. 
Figs are jobbing in a moderate way at 6H@i3C, as 
to quality. 

New York Wheat Market. 

New York, Dec. 26.— Spot has been in fair re- 
quest; although the increased firmness in the market 
has tended to check the export demand, nevertheless 
prices are ic and 2c better. Options have been 
lairly active and firmer, closing as follows: Decem- 
ber 90 cents, January 90^ cents, February 92^ 
cents, March 93^^ cents. May g6^ cents. 

Hops. 

New York, Dec. 26. — Hops quiet, without new 
features. Coast crop, 1886, prime to choice, 2s@27 
cents; do., fair to good, 22(<t)24 cents; 1885, good to 
choice, io@i3 cents. 

Local Markets. 

BAG.S— The market has a stronger, advancing 
tone for Calcultas, due chiefly to the warlike re- 



ports from Europe. The market is quotable as fol- 
lows: 

Bean @ ^^c. 

New Gunnies 9^c@ioc. 

Second-hand (iunnies @ 6}fc. 

Calcutta Standard,May-June delivery 5^c@ sHc. 
Potato Bags, No. 2 3C@ 3%c. 

BARLEY — The market weakened off under 
threatening weather up to to-day, when it was 
stronger, notwithstanding the rains, owing to a re- 
port of a large short interest on Call, and also that 
the supply in the State is less than thought. Trans- 
actions on Call the past week were free, with to- 
day's sales as follows: 

Morning Session: Buyer season — 100 tons, 
$i.07Ki 100, $1.08; 200, $i.o8}i; 300, $i.o8}4; 
100, $1.08^. Seller 1886—100 tons, $1.04$? ctl. 
Afternoon Session: Buyer season — 600 tons, $i.o8M. 
Seller season — 100 tons, $i.ooK; too, Ji.ooH; 100. 
$1.00%; 100, St. 00^, Seller 1886— 100 tons, $1.04; 
100, $i.045f ^ ctl. 

BUTTER — The market is dull and demoralized. 
The quality of the fresh butter coming in is poor. 
The market closed weak. 

CHEESE — Last week's remark covers this week's 
market. 

EGGS — A iree demand, with lighter receipts, 
cause a strong market at a slight advance. 

FLOUR — The market in sympathy with wheat is 
very strong, with a further advance at an early day 
not at all improbable. 

WHEAT — Buyers are pursuing their usual tac- 
tics of depressing the market, but without effect, as 
holders who have not sold are firm in their ask- 
ing prices of from 2'A to yl4 cents per cental above 
bids. Heavy sales were made the past week; one 
holder placed 10,000 tons, but at an advance on quo- 
tations; the quality averaged fair to good. On Call, 
transactions the past week were unusually large, 
with full prices paid. To-day's sales are as follows: 

Morning Session: Buyer season — 300 tons, 
$i.58M; 100, $t.53K; 300, $1.58 Ji; 200. $1.58^; 
2700, $1.59. Buyer 1886 — 200 tons, $t.49M; 400, 
$1.49^ ^ ctl. Afternoon Session: Buyer season — 
1900 tons, $1.59; 3000, $1.58^. Buyer 1886—100 
tons, $1.49^; 100, $1.49^. 

(COMMUKICATID.) 

Market Information. 

Cereals. 

Barley held to strong prices up to Monday, when, 
owing to cloudy weather, an easier feeling set in, re- 
sulting in a lower range of values. It is very gen- 
erally conceded that although the stock in this State 
in warehouses is larger than at this time last year, 
yet the quantity on the granaries in farmers' hands 
is very much less now than in December, 1885. If 
this be true, then the present low prices are not war- 
rantable. The consumption continues large, but 
the export demand is restricted, owing to buyers 
waiting for lower [irices. 

Oats are very firm, with a slight advance obtain- 
able for the better grades. Western oats are slow, 
owing to the quality being below this coast's pro- 
duction. Oregon and Washington oats are in fair 
supply, but as receipts are light, holders are firmer. 
It is claimed that the supply to draw from is light. 

Choice grades of California corn are in light offer- 
ing, causing a strong tone; but fair to good is in 
liberal supply with prices in buyers' favor. Western 
corn is in moderate supply, but prices favor buyers. 

In rye and buckwheat there is nothing new to re- 
port. 

The wheat market holds strong, notwithstanding 
this is the last week of the year, when all trans- 
actions are virtually suspended. The strength of 
the market is due to the paucity of stocks through- 
out the civilized world, supplemented by an almost 
certainty of war in Europe at an early day. The 
very best informed writers are thoroughly con- 
vinced that although war may for a time be averted, 
yet sooner or later it must come, but even if it does 
not, a much higher range of values is looked for be- 
fore June, 1887. Eastern advices are confirmatory 
of a lighter stock, take the visible and invisible as a 
whole, than at this time last year; and as Europe's 
main dependence is on this country, it is not at all 
unlikely but there will not be any of consequence to 
spare by April next. In this State the prevailing 
opinion is that when the returns of the stock on 
hand on January i, 1887, are rendered, the aggre- 
gate w ill be very considerably below former years, 
and as there is quite a short interest on Call, with a 
large engaged tonnage in port, a stronger buying 
will be cleveloped, which will force values to a much 
better figure than now obtains. Continued dry 
weather is a nmch stronger inducement to hold 
than all else combined. IMany now appear firmly 
fixed in the belief that next year's will be consider- 
ably below an average. 

Feedstuffs. 

Bran has been marked up, owing to lighter sup- 
plies and a good demand. Middlings, ground bar- 
ler, feedmeal, and oilcake meal are essentially un- 
changed. The demand for all kinds is reported 
good. 

Feed carrots are in heavy supply, with prices 
favoring buyers. 

Hay IS in an unsettled conflition. Buyers only 
take in a hand-to-mouth kind of way, under the be- 
lief that with heavy rains soon, farmers will be free 
sellers. Holders are not making concessions on last 
week's prices. 

Fruits. 

Oranges continue to come to hand in excess of 
trade wants, which causes the market to rule weak. 
The demand is good for the season. Limes and 
leaions are also in liberal supply, with prices weak 
and in buyers' favor. The demand is light. 

Choice apples continue in light supply, with a 
good inquiry ruling; poor varieties are in heavy stock, 
with [jrices against sellers. The receipts from 
Oregon are lessening, but from the East they are 
quite free. 

Pears are scarce and command good prices. 
Hops. 

The market is inactive, but holders are firm. A 
late issue of Dradstreet s reports the New York mar- 
ket as follows: " The imports from Germany have 
been exceedingly heavy, and New York warehouses 
are overcrowded with hops. Possibly two-thirds of 
the arrivals, however, are for account of outstanding 
contracts with brewers, and the available surplus in 
dealers' hands is a matter of speculation. While the 



PAOIPIO OOA8T WEATHER FOR THE WEEK. 

[Fanilahed for pubUcatloa In thli paper by Nelson Ooroh, Sergeant Signal Bervloe Corp*. U. 8. A. 





Portland. 


Bed Bluff. 


Sacramento. 


S.Francisco. 


Los Angelee. 


San Diego 


DATS. 


B 


s 
B 




1 


s? 
I 


1 




s 

S- 


Bain 


H 

« 
B 




9 


Rain 






p 


Rain 


H 

a 
B 


D 


1 


S. 
B" 


« 
B 


5 
p. 


<s 


Deo. 23-29. 








o 








? 








or 

9 








V 
9 








& 

a 








? 




.02 


43 


S 


Cy. 




55 


Cm 


Cy. 


.00 


52 


SE 


Cy. 


.14 


63 


SE 


Cy 


.00 


60 


E 


CI. 


.00 


58 


Nw 


Fr. 


Friday 


.05 


43 


S 


Cy. 


.00 




8 


Cy. 


.00 


56 


SE 


Fr. 


.00 


53 


SE 


Oy. 


.00 


70 


W 


Fr. 


.00 


64 


Nw 


Fr. 




.3!> 


48 


s 


LR 


.00 


47 


SW 


Cy. 


.00 


54 


Nw 


Fr. 


.00 


52 


N 


Cy. 


.00 


67 


SE 


CL 


.00 


61 


W 


CI. 




1 37 


41 


N 


LR. 


.02 


49 


Cm 


Cy. 


.00 


60 


E 


Cy. 


.00 


51 


N 


Cy. 


.00 


57 


Nw 


CI. 


JO 


59 


SW 


Fr. 




.75 


31 


NE 


LR. 


.00 


50 


SW 


Oy. 


.00 


60 


Nw 


CI. 


.00 


62 


NE 


Fr. 


.00 


55 


NE 


Fr. 


.00 


61 


SW 


01. 


Tuesday 


.57 


37 


Nw 


Cy. 


.15 


48 


s 


LR 


.00 


54 


SE 


Cy. 


.00 


68 


S 


Oy. 


.00 


59 


E 


Cy. 


.00 


62 


SW 


Cy. 


Wednesday... 


.35 


36 


BE 


LR. 


1.77 


52 


S 


LR. 


.25 


55 


SE 


LR 


.02 


59 


S 


LK. 




56 


E 


LR 


.00 


64 


w 


Cy. 


Total 


3.46 








I 94 








.26 








.16 
















.00 









Explanation.— CI. (or clear; Cy , cloudy; Fr., (air; Fy., foggy; — indioatea too small to measure. Temperature 
Wind and weather at 12M M. (Pacific Standard time), with amount of rainfall in the preceding 24 huun. 



snpply of really choice goods is inconsiderable, the 
heavy weight of good, useful mediums and the large 
stocks of low and inferior grades have depressed 
and weakened the market. Choice Bohemians and 
Rents, and fine Pacific hops are still, however, firm, 
and there is little doubt that the best descriptions of 
all kinds will rule considerably higher in a few weeks' 
time. Reports are rife among New York growers that 
the roots of the vine have been injured by lice, and 
many experienced hop men think that the prospects 
for a good crop in this State next year are very 
poor." 

The London Brewers' Guardian of Nov. 30 pub- 
lishes the official returns as to the acreage under 
hops during the last three years, from which we take 
the following: 

ACREAGE UNDER HOP.S IN ENGLAND, AS RETURNED 
JUNE 4 IN THE YEARS t886, 1885, AND 1884. 



Acres. 
1886. 

Kent 43.924 

Hants 3,339 

Hereford 6,770 

Surrey 2,547 

Sussex 10,391 

Worcester 2.951 

Other counties 199 



Acres. 
1885. 

44.834 
3.303 
6,703 
2,627 

10,722 
2,910 
228 



Acres. 
1884. 
43.464 
3.197 
6,602 
2.493 
10,382 
2,873 
247 



69.258 



Totals 70,127 71.327 

Live-stock. 

The consumption of beef is largely increased, but 
offerings continue on a liberal scale, which keeps val- 
ues from advancing. It is stated that with heavy 
rains and bad roads, deliveries of cattle will fall off, 
which will create higher prices with us. Mutton 
sheep are steady, with a firm tone for the better con- 
ditioned. Hogs are easy under a continued free 
selling pressure. Milch cows are in slightly better 
inquiry. In hofses there is nothing new to report. 

BEEF— Extra, 7@7}4c; first grade, grass fed, 6!4 
@7C per lb; second grade, 5M@6c; third grade, s@ 
— c. 

MUTTON— Ewes, s@— c; wethers, 5M@— c 

LAMB— Spring, 6@7c. Yearlings, — c. 

■VEAL — Large, 7fe8c; small, <)% to loc. 

PORK — Live hogs, 2 K to 3c for heavy and me- 
dium; hard dressed, 4 to 6c per lb; light, 25^ to 3c; 
dressed, 3K to 4Mc; soft hogs, live, xH to 2^c. 

On foot, one-third less for grain or stall fed, and 
one-half less for stock running out. 

'Vesetables. 

Potatoes continue steady, with choice qualities 
scarce. Notwithstanding the holidays, the demand 
is fair for both home and shipping. Sweet potatoes 
are strong. 

Choice onions are strong, owing to a lighter stock 
and a good demand. Cut and otherwise poor 
onions are slow and weak. 

Cabbages and root vegetables are steady. 
Mlscellaneoua 

Grass seeds are in better inquiry, but prices are 
unchanged. 

lieans are firmer, with a good shipping demand, 
notwithstanding receipts have largely increased. 

Honey holds strong, with both the stock and sup- 
ply light for the season. 

Raisins, if choice, are firmly held at steady prices, 
but other qualities are shaded so as to find custom. 
Eastern papers continue to speak well of the more 
choice packed, and predict that California raisins 
will take the lead in the near future. 

Heretofore, turkeys ruled very low a day or two 
before each holiday, owing to heavy receipts, but the 
past Christmas they sold very high, owing to light 
receipts. So far this week the market has been 
steady. In hens, roosters, ducks, and geese, the 
market shows but little change. 

On Monday last, the market was glutted with 
hares, causing a very low range in prices; since then 
they are higher. Other wild game ruled fairly steady. 

The tonnage movement compares with last year at 
this date as follows: 

1886. 

On the way 215,278 

In port, disengaged 62,282 

In port, engaged 56,079 



do Choice 2 00 @ 2 

do Nuvels 2 SO @ 4 

do Panama... — @ 

Peachee, bz — m 

do l>a8k ~ ^ 

Crawfords, bl — w 
do bskt. . — @ 

do choice — @ 

Fearsbz 75 <g 1 

do choice 2 00 @ 2 

do Bartlett, bi <!S 
Persimmons, 

Jap, bi 1 00 @ 1 

Pineapplee, doz. 4 00 @ 6 
Pomegranates, b — @ 

Plums tb — M 

Prunes bx . 
do Kgg. . 

Quinces bi ~ ^ 

Raspberries ch. . — @ 
Strawberries cb. 5 00 6> 6 
Watermelons 100 — @ 
DRIED FRUIT. 
Apple*, siloed, lb 3 & 
ao eTaporated. 8 m 
do quartered 



- » - I 



ua - 



Apricots 12 3 

do eTaporated 20 @ 
Blaokberrloa.... 

Citron 

Date* 

Figs, preaaed.... 

Figs, loose 

Nectarine*... 

do evaporated 
Peache* 

do pared. .... 
Pears, sliced.... 

do qrtd 

do evaporated 
Plums, ]iitte<L.. 

do unpitted. .. 
Prunes 

do French .... 
Zante Currants. 




RAISINS. 
DehesaCluB, fey 2 65 @ — 
imperial Cabin- 
et, fancy.... 1 90 e — 
Crown London 

Layers, fey. . 1 70 @ — 
do Loose Mus- 
catels, fancy 1 60 — 
do Loose Mua- 

catels 1 50 @ . — 

Cal. Valencias.. 1 50 CS — 

do Layers .... 1 50 ^ — 

do Sultanas ... 1 50 ^ — 
Fractions come 25, 50 and 75 
cents higher for halves, quar- 
ters and eighths. 

VBUETABLES. 

Aitlohoke*. doi. —9 ~ 

Asparagus box.. — (a — 

Beets, sk lOOU — 

Oabb*«e,100Bi*. SO S 75 

OaiTota, sk 25 § 35 

Cauliflower, doi. — @ — 

Eggplant bx — « — | 

Oarlio, Ibnew.. — ® - 
Green Com, 

siiiall 1k>x... — @ — 

do large box . . — @ — 

Green Peas, Bi. . — W — 

Lettuce, do*.... 10 d — 

Lima Beans lb.. — @ -- 

Mushrooms, bx. — » — 

do cultivated. — @ — 

Okra. dry, lb... 10 dt 121 

dogrueu tM>x.. — @ — 

Parsnips, ctl.... 1 50 » — 

Peppers, dry lb.. 10 @ — 

do preen, bi.. 40 & 60 

Puiui.kinx prtoDl2 00 (ctlb 00 
Squash, Marrow 

tat, coo 7 00 @12 00 

do Summer bx 25 @ 40 
String beans lb. . ~ S 

Tomatoeaboi.. — w — 

Turnip* otl 76 « 1 00 



Domestlo Frodaoe. 



Extra choice in good packages fetch an advance on top 
quotatiuus. while very poor grades sell less than the luwer 
quotations. Wsdnesdat, Dec. 29, IM6. 

iiKANS AND PEAS. -Peanut* 4k^ - 

Barcctl 1 40 ^ 1 55 Filbert* 10 A 11 



) 25 
1 60 I 

1 60 I 

2 00 ( 



1 40 

1 1 70 

2 45 
1 05 

I 1 12i 



75 



ETC. 

25 
30 
13 
18 



POTATOES 

Burbank 1 10 @ 1 30 

Early Rose 60 " " 

CuffeyCove 1 00 

Jersey Blues... 1 10 

Petaluma. — 

Tomales 1 00 

Rirer reds 70 

Humboldt — 

do Kidney.... — 

Chile — 

do Oregon... I 15 

Peerless 1 10 

Salt Lake - 

Sweet 2 00 



15 (8 



32 J 8 

25 @ 



1885. 

152.365 
129,950 
41,062 



Totals 333.639 323.377 

The above gives a carrying capacity, as follows: 
1886, 527,515 short tons; 1885, 513,475 short tons; 
increase over last year, 14,040. 

Dried fruits contmue strong for all kinds except 
prunes, which temporarily are weak under heavy re- 
ceipts. 

San Francisco, Dec. iq, 1886. 



Fruits and Vegetables. 



Kxtra choice 
quotatiouB, whil 
quotatiouB. 
A.ppleB, bx com.. 

cto choice , 

Ban&nftfl. bunch. 
Blackberries, ch. 
Oaittul(>u))«B. cr. 
Cherries blk.... 

do Royal Ann. 
Cherry plums.., 

Crabapplee , 

Cranlwrriee .... 
OurraotB cheet.. 

Figft, bx , 

Grapea , 



in good pftckagee fetch an advance on top 
very poor grades Hell less than the lower 
Wkdnkhuat. Dec 29, 1886. 
75 @ 1 00 " 
1 25 @ 1 50 
. 1 50 @ 3 00 



1 50 
10 00 



i 1 75 
tn 60 



do Rose Peru. 


- (S 


B — 


do Muscat.... 


- ^ 


1 — 


do Tokays. ... 


- «! 


? - 




— ff 


J - 


Wine, Zinfandel 


- ^ 


\ 1 00 


do Mi:.sion.... 


- e 


1 — 




4 50 » 


1 6 - 


do CaL box ... 


60 C 


1 1 00 


Lemons, CaL.bz 


1 00 i 


1 \ 60 


do SicUy, box. 


2 00 (k 


1 2 50 


do Auitrallaa. 






N'ectariues. box. 






Oranges, Cum bx 


1 25 (i 


1 1 75 



Butter 1 25 S 1 55 

Pea 1 60 @ 1 

Red 1 25 @ 1 40 

Pink 

Large White.. 
SmaU White.. 

Lima 

Fid Peas, blk eye 1 00 

do green 1 00 

do Niles 1 25 

BRUOM CORN. 
Southern per ton 50 St 
Northern per tun 50 @ 
CHICORY. 

Oalltomia. 4 @ 

Oerman 

DAIRY PRODUCE, I 

BUTTm. 

Oal. fresh roll, lb. 20 @ 

do Fancy br'nd* 27 i 3 

Pickle roU 16 

Firkin, new 15 <H 

Eastern. — d 

OBCUS 

Cfaeeiie,Oal., lb.. 12 
Eastern style... 

C008. 

Oal., ranch, dox.. 

do, store. 

Ducks ~ ~ 

Oregon ~9 

Eastern — @ — 

Utah — e - 

TBXD. 

Bran, ton 15 50 @i\(> 'M 

Commeal 36 00 @27 00 

Gr'd Barley ton. 24 OO @25 OU 

Hay 8 00 

Uiddllngs. Vi 50 

Oil Cake Me^. 26 60 

Straw, bale 35 @ 

FLOUR. 
Extra. City Mill* 4 37i( 
ao Oo'otry Mills 4 25 ( 

Supertiue 3 25 ( 

GRAIN. ETC. 
Barley, feed, ctL 1 00 i 
do Brewing.. 1 10 ( 

Oheraller 1 45 ( 

do Ooaat... 90 i 

Buckwheat 1 00 I 

Com, Wblte.... — 

Ydlow I 05 1 lU iFlaxseed 

Small Round. 1 10 @ 1 15 Hemp 

Nebraska 07i^ 1 05 i Italian RyeOran 

Oats, new — W — t Perennial 

Choice feed 1 35 » 1 50 Uillet, German.. 

do K'Md 1 27i@ 1 321, do Common. 

do fair 1 25 ffl 1 27! 

do black 1 40 @ 1 U 

do Oregon 1 25 @ 1 45 

Rye 1 10 @ 1 26 

Wheat milling. 

Gilt edged.. 1 5613 - 

do Ohoioe 1 63K§ 1 56 

do fiilrtogood 1 52JW - 
Shiiipiug choice 1 63}@ — 



5 

1 ■& 
1 30 

1 25 
1 00 



1 30 
1 40 



2 50 

POULTRY AND OAMK. 

Hens, dox 6 00 (d 7 50 

Roosters 6 00 @ 7 60 

BroUera 4 00 S 6 00 

Ducks, tame.... 4 00 @ 6 00 
do Mallard.... 2 OO @ 3 SO 

do Sprig 1 00 § 1 60 

Geese, pair 1 00 @ 2 00 

du (.osliugs . .. — @ — 
wild Gray, doi 3 00 « - 

Turkeys, lb 16 H 19 

do Dressed.. 19 3 21 
TurkeyFeathen, 

tail and wing.. 10 @ 10 
Snipe, Eng., doz. — « — 
do Oommon.. ~ <A — 

Doves 76 a 85 

^uail 90 a 1 00 

KabbiU 1 00 8 1 2S 

Hare 1 50 fi 2 00 

Venison 8 # 10 

PROVISION8. 
Oal. Bacon, 

Heavy, It 8ia 9 

Medium i\% 9 

Light I0!§ lU 

Extra Light.. 12^ 12S 

Lard 7 % 91 

4 02i Oal.SmokedBeef Wvk 121 

3 75 [Hams, Cal 10 @ 12) 

I do Eastern.. 13 1 14 
1 07i' SEEDS. 
1 ?5 Alfalfa. 
1 60 lOanary. 

1 45 Clover red U' 

1 20 I White 17»( 

{Cotton . 



4 75 



12 @ 
3S 



do goud 1 50 , 

du fair 1 461(! 

HIDES. 

Dry - « 

Wet salted 8 ( 

HONEY, BTO. 

Beeswax, lb 20 ( 

Honey In comb. 9 I 
Honey in comb, 

fancy 

Extracted, Ugbt. 
do dark. 

HOPS. 

Oregon 20 8 

oJUomu 20 a 

ONIONS. 

Pickling — a 

SUversaln, 75 @ 

NUTS— JOBBINO. 
Wabiute, CaL,I> n\m 
do Chile. - a 
Almonds, hdshl. 6 a 

Soft sbeU 15 a 

Brazil. 10 a 

Pecans. 9 a 



Mustard, white.. 

Brown : 

Rape 

Kt. Blue Grass.. 

Sd quali^ 

Sweet V. Grass. 

Orchard. 10 i 

Red Top U I 

Htmgariaa.... 1 1 

Lawn ao ( 

Mesqult 10 I 

Timothy 

TALLOW. 

»i Grade, lb li< 

Refined 6{i 

22 I WOOL, ETC 



16 



12 



m 131 

I i 



1 40 

13J 

9 
19 
11 
11 



8PEINO— 1886 

Humboldt and 

Mendocino . . . 

Sact'o valley 

Free Monutain. 
N'hern defective 
3 Joaquin short. 

do long 

Cava'v & F thll. 
Oregon Kastern. 

do valley 23 » 

Southern Coast. 13 ^ 

FALL— 1886 

Sotithem, free.. 17 ^ 

do defective.. Ul« 

Northern, free.. 10 ^ 

do defeetire.. 16 w 

Middle free 18 

do defective,, 16 <s 



22 ( 

17 ( 
17 « 

14 ( 



17 I 



25 
10 
10 



11 
2S 
17 

10 
19 
23 
10 
11 
U 



Jan. 1, 1887] 



f AClFie I^URAId f ress. 



17 



Inducements to Subscribers. 

To favor subscribera to this paper, and to induce new 
patrons to try our pubiication, we wili furnish, to those 
who pay fully one year in advance of date, if beqobsted, 
the following articles (while this notice continues), at the 
very greatly reduced fifrures named at the right : 

1. — The Agricultural Features of California, by Prof. 

Hilgard, 138 large pages, illustrated, cloth, with 
colored maps (full price 31) $0.25 

2. — World's Cyclopedia, 794 pages, 1250 illustrations ; 

(exceedingly valuable) 50 

3. — Dewey's Patent Elastic Binder (cloth cover), name 

of this paper stamped in gilt 50 

4. — Niles' Stock and Poultry Book for Pacific Coast, 

pamphlet, 120 pages, illustrated 25 

5. — Kendall's Treatise on the Horse and Diseases, 89 

pages, instructive illustrations 05 

6. — To New Subscribers, 12 select back Nos. of the 

Rural Press, "good as new" Free 

7. _Any of Harper's, Frank Leslie's and most other first- 

class U. S. periodicals, 15 per ct. off regular rates. 
9.— Pacific Coast and Eastern Dailies, Books and Period- 
icals, except special publications, we can usually 
give 10 to 16 per cent off advertised retail rates. 

10. — March of Empire, by Mallie Stafford 25 

1 1. — Life Among the Apaches, 322 pages, stiff cloth .25 

12. — $1 worth of choice seeds, to be selected from a list 

of 107 flower and 82 garden seeds, as previously pub- 
lished, or which list we will send on application .25 

14. — Dewey's Pat.Newspaper Fileholder (18 to 36 in.) .25 

15. — European Vines Described, 63 pages 05 

19. —Webster's Dictionary, 634 pages, with 1500 illustra- 
tions; very handy and reliat>le 50 

23.— Architecture Simplified, 60 pages 15 

24 —Mother Bickerdyke's Life with the Army; patriotie 

and ably written; 168 pp., cloth, ?1.00 75 

Beautiful Poetic Review, entertaining and instructive 
35 pages (a handsome and pleasing present). . .25 

Note.— The cash must accompany all orders. Address 
this office. No. 252 Market St., S. F. 

Inform your neighbors about our offers and paper. 
Sample copies of this paper mailed free to persons 
thought likely to subscribe. 

Send for any further information desired. 



Complimentary Samples. 

Persons receiving this paper marked are re- 
quested to examine its contents, terms of sub- 
scription, and give it their own patronage, and, 
as far as practicable, aid in circulating the jour- 
nal, and making its valus more widely known 
to others, and extending its influence in the 
cause it faithfully serves. Subscription rate, 
$3 a year. Extra copies mailed for 10 cents, if 
ordered soon enough. If already a subscriber 
please show the paper to others. 

It Should Always be Borne in Mind 

That time is the only really impartial test of genuine 
merit, and that according to the universal law of 
"the survival of the fittest," few sewing machines 
have withstood this test. Therefore, the only safe 
thing to do is to buy what time has proven to be the 
fittest" — the "Domestic" Sewing Machine, 



This season of the year eggs command a high price, 
and hens demand extra inducements to make them 
ay. Fresh ground oyster shells and fresh ground bone 
about the poultry house, and a warm breakfast of ground 
corn meal, will greatly help the hens to increase their 
power to lay. Write Wilson Brothers, Easton, Pa., to 
send you their free catalogue, telling you all about 
their grinding mills, so useful to every poultry keeper 
and farmer, backed up by testimonials from many who 
use them. 

Cheap Money for Farmers. 

Farmers in this State will be glad to learn that 
they can borrow on mortgage any amount, from 
$5000 to $500,000, from S. D. Hovey, 330 Pine St., 
San Francisco, at 6 to 7 per cent and taxes. ** 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1886, the Board 
of Directors of The German Savings and Loan Society 
has declared a dividend at the rate of four and thirty-two 
one-hundredths (4 32 100) per cent per annum on term 
deposits and three and sixty one-hundredths (3 60-100) 
per cent per annum on ordinary deposits, payable on and 
after the 3d day ot January, 1887. By order. 

GEO. LETTE, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
SAN FRANCISCO~SAVINGS UNION, 

532 California St., cor. Webb. 

For the half year ending with 31st December, 1886, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four and one- 
half (4i) per cent per annum on term deposits, and three 
and three-fourths (33) per cent per annum on ordinary 
deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Monday, 3d 
January, 1887. LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 



ANNUALJVIEETING. 

The regular Annual Meeting of the Stockholders of th« 
Grangers' Bank of California, for the election of Direc- 
tors for the ensuing year, will take place at the office of 
the Bank, in the city of San Francisco, State of Cali- 
fornia, on Tuesday, the 11th day of January, 1887, at 1 
o'clock p. M. For Grangers' Bank of California. 

ALBERT MONTPELLIEE. 

Cashier and Manager. 



Reasons why Sherwood's Steel Harness is 
the Best and should and will be 
Universally Used: 

1.— It is a common sense Harness. 2. — It is made of ma- 
terial that will last a lifetime. 3. — In plowing, dragging, 
logging and scraping there are no whiffletrees. 4. — In all 
farm work you can chanee from plow to wagon quick. 

5. — In plowing in the orchard, you can't bark fruit trees. 

6. — In plowing and cultivating hops it has no equal. 

7. — In plowing along the fencesyou can get two furrows 
closer. 8. — Horses cannot step over the traces, or calk 
themselves. 9.— A small boy will handle plow readily. 
10. — There is no weight on piow beam. 11.— Team works 
one-thild easier. 12.— There is no chafing, crowding or 
fretting of team. 13 — For man and team it has no equal. 
Do not hesitate, but order at once from your nearest 
agent. Address 

TRUMAN. ISHAM & HOOKER, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Rnral Seed Offering-1886. 

Great Inducements for New Subscriptions. 

To encourage gardening and further extend the circula- 
tion of the Pacific Rcrai, Press, we will offer, while this 
notice remains in our columns, to furnish to all old or 
new subscribers the following seeds on the favorable 
terras named below: 



VEGETABLK SEEDS. 
83 Varieties. 

In Papers, postpaid. Cta 

BEET. 

1 Early Blood Turnip... 10 

2 Karly Extra Basaano. . 10 

3 White Sugar 10 

4 Yellow Sugar 10 

5 Early Bong Dark Blo'd 10 

CABBAGE, 

6 Early York 5 

7 Early Dutch 10 

8 Early Wakefield 10 

9 Ex"a Fine Large Dutch 10 

10 Early French Oxheart. 10 

11 Large- Late Drumhead 10 



12 Ked Dutch (pickling). 

CELERY. 



94 Cacalia Coccinea (Tas- 

sel flower) 

95 Campanula Speculum, 

(Venus' L'king Glass) 5 

96 Candytuft, white frag't 5 

97 CentaureaCynu8(Bach- 

elor's Button) 5 

98 Clarkia, tine mixed 5 

99 Convolvulus (Morning 

Glory) mixed 5 

100 Foxglove, mixed 5 

101 GIlia, mixed 5 

102 Globe Araaranthus. ... 5 
1U3 Gypsophila Elegans... 5 

104 Ice Plant 5 

105 Larkspur, fine-st mixed 5 

106 LinumGrandifl'a(Fl«) 5 



10|I07 Love-in-a-mist 5 

108 Marigold, db IFreiich. 5 



109 Marigold, African, dbl, 

no Mignonette, Sweet 5 

111 Nasturtium 5 

112 Nolana 5 

113 Fortulaca, mixed 5 



13 White Solid 10 

CAULIFLOWER. 

14 Early Paris 10 

C.VRROT. 

15 Extra Early Forcing.. 10 

16 Long Orange lOjlU Poppy, Double, mixed. 5 

17 Early Horn 5 115 Rocket, Sweet 5 



18 White Belgian. 

CUCUMBER. 

19 White Spine 10 

20 Early Cluster 10 

21 Early Frame 5 

22 Long Green 5 

23 Eng. Gherkin, Pickles. 10 

LETTUCE. 

24 Early Curled Silesia... 10 

25 Ice Dmmhead 5 

26 .Simpson's Early Curl'd 10 

27 Prize Head 10 

2B White Paris Caa 10 

29 Hanson 10 

30 Boston Market 10 

MELONS, 

31 Large Yel. Oanteloupe 10 

32 Extra Fine Nutmeg. .. 10 

33 Casaba (new) 10 



116 Scabioaa, Dw'f, mixed. 5 

117 Sensitive Plant 5 

118 Sweet Pea, White 5 

119 Sweet Pea, Crimson, 

Everlasting 10 

120 Sweet Peas, mixed 5 

121 Sweet William, mixed 5 

122 Sunflower, Cal., Dbl e. 5 

123 Adlumia Cirrhosa 

(Mountain Fringe).. 10 

124 Ahhea (Hollyhock) fine 

mixed 10 

125 Aster, China, mixed. . . 10 

126 Australian Vine 10 

127 Balsam (Lady Slipper) 

fine mixed 10 

123 Bals'm, Fine Paris, dbl 15 

129 Balsam, Splendid, dbl, 10 

130 Balsam, Dwarf, double 25 



34 Cuban Queen W'meloD 101131 Balsam, Rose Fl'd, dbl 15 



35 Mt. Sweet Watermelon 10 

36 Iron Clad Watermelon 10 
►37 Scaly Bark do 10 

38 Black .Spanish do 10 

39 White Imp, or Lodi do 10 

ONION. 

40 Early Red 10 

41 Red Wethersfield 10 

42 Yellow Danvers 10 

44 W. Por gal or Sil. Skin 10 

PARSNIP. 

45 White Dutch 5 

46 New Early Round 10 

KADISH. 

47 Mammoth California.. 10 

48 Olive Shaped Radish.. 10 

49 Early .Scarlet Turnip.. 5 

50 Bl'k Spanish or Wint'r 10 

.SQUASH 

61 Early Scollop Bush 5 

62 Early Sum. Cr'k Neck. 5 
53 Cahfornia Field 10 

64 Marblchead 10 

65 Bostou Marrow Wint'r 10 

56 New Hubbard Winter. 10 

TOMATO, 

57 Large YeUow 10 

58 The Conqueror 10 

69 Early Red Smooth.... 10 

60 Trophy 10 

61 Canada Victor (earh'st) 10 

62 Acme 10 

TURNIP, 

63 Cow Horn 10 

64 Yel. Rutab'a or Sw'd'h 10 

65 Early Wh'e Flat Dutch 5 

66 Long White French.... 10 

67 Imp. Late Rutabaga.. 5 

SPINACH. 

68 Round Leaf 10 

69 Large Flanders 10 

PEAS. 



132 Balloon Vine 10 

133 Browallia (irandiflora. 10 

134 Canna (Indian Shot).. 10 

135 Canna, fine mixed var. 10 

136 Celosia OristataVarie'a 10 

137 Celosia Cristata Pur- 

purea 10 

138 Clematis Flammula ... 15 

139 Dahlia Sunerflua. mxd 25 

140 Dianthus C h i n e n s i s 

(Indian Pink) 10 

141 DianthusC hi n en si 8 

Doulile White 10 

142 Celosia Cristata. fine 

mixed (Coxcomb) 10 

143 Chrysanth'um Album. 10 

144 Datura, fine mixed 10 



145 Evening Primrose. 



10 

146 Four O'clock, mixed., in 

147 Forget-me-not 10 

148 Geranium Zonale 10 

149 Geranium, fancy color 

ed leaves 25 

150 Godetia (The Bride).. . 10 

151 Gourds (Hercules Club) 10 

152 Ipomcea (Cypress Vine) 10 

153 Indian Pink, dbl,, mxd 10 

154 Lobelia, Crystal Palace 

C'ompacta 25 

155 Lobelia, Blue 10 

156 Musk Plant 10 

157 Nierembergia Gracilis. 10 
~ - 10 

10 



158 Pansy, fine mixed, 

159 Petuuia, mixed. 



160 Phlox Druramoudii, 

fine mixed 10 

161 Pyrethrum A u r e u m 

(Golden Feather) 10 

162 Salpiglo?sis mixed.... 10 

163 Stock (Ten Week) 10 

164 Wallflower, fine mixed 10 

165 Wallflower. pmTjle 10 



FRENCH COACH HORSES. 



19 

167 Zinnia, Scarlet, dbl.... 10 

168 Belles Perernis (Daisy) 

.single 15 

169 Campanula Mediiun 

(Canterbury Belle).. 15 

170 Canary Bird Flower. . . 15 

171 Thunbergia, mixed 15 

172 Aquilegia Alpina (Col- 

umbine) 20 

173 Heliotro])ium, fine mxd 20 

174 Heliotrop'm.dark. mxd 20 

175 Verbeua, choice, mx'd. 20 

176 Violet, Blue 20 

177 Balsam Camelia, flow'd 20 

178 Carnation, fine mixed. 25 

179 Digitalis 5 

180 Dolichos(Hyac'thBean) 10 

181 Gaillardia Grandiflora 

Hybridia 10 

182 Nemophila, fine mixed 10 

183 Perilha Nankineusis. . 5 

184 Saponaria Multiflora. . 5 

185 Scabiosa Atropurpuria 10 

186 ScarletRunner3(Climb- 

er.s) 5 

187 Schizanthus (Hardy 

Annuals) 6 

188 Schtzanthus, finest 

mixed colors 5 

189 Myrsiphylium Aspara- 
goides (Smilax) 25 



70 Extra Early 1(^1166 Zinnia, mixed fine 

71 Champion of England 10 ""^ " '-^ 

72 Yorkshire Hero 10 

73 Queen of Dwarfs 10 

BEANS. 

82 Black German Wax... 10 

83 Refugee 10 

84 Red Valentine 10 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

74 Kohlrabi 10 

75 Scotch Kale 10 

76 Curled Parsley 6 

77 Sage 10 

78 Thyme 10 

79 Tobacco 25 

80 Blue Gum 25 

81 Monterey Cypress 25 

ELOWEB SEEDS. 
107 Varieties. 

85 Acroclinium 5 

86 Alonsoa. Grandifiora.. 5 

87 Alyssum. Sweet 10 

88 Amaranthus Abyssin's 15 

89 Ageratum Lasseauxii. 10 
93 Adlumia Cirrhosa 10 

91 Ambronia Umbollata. . 10 

92 Amaranthus Caudatus 

(Love-lies-bleeding).. 5 

93 Antirrhinum Majus, 

finest mixed 5 

t^Refer to Nos. in latest issue when ordering. 

For $1.00 we will furnish new subscribers the Pacific 
Rural Press for three months, and $1.00 worth 
of the above seeds. For SI. 75 the Rural six months 
and $1.00 worth of seeds. For $3.25 the Rural one 
year, and $1 worth of seeds. For$4.60 the Rural foreight- 
een months and $1 in seeds. The, seeds will he carefully 
forwarded, post paid, from some one or more of our lead- 
Inir and reliable seedsmen, whose name will accomnany 
the package. In ordering, write on a separate sheet the 
mimber only of each article wanted as numbered, 
together with your address. 

Old subscribers can advance payment so that their sub- 
scriptions will be paid the same length of time in advance 
and receive the same terms as above. Those who have 
remitted since this offer was made can send the addi- 
tional amount which would have entitled them to a 
premium, and receive the same by stating which numbers 
they prefer. 

For other kinds of seeds, or for seeds in larger pack- 
ages, patrons are referred to reliable seedsmen advertising 
in this paper. We wish to aid in increasing the planting 
and cultivation of gardens. 

We are not going to embark in the regular seed busi- 
ness, and have not time to investigate or answer many 
questions of private interest only, nor respond to orders 
received without remittances. 

Subscribers will please notify neighbors who do not 
take this paper of this offer, and the merits of the Rural. 

In writing correspondence, items of information, or on 
other business, please use a separate sheet. 



Shoidd consult 
DEWEY & CO. 
American 



California Inventors 

AND FoREioN PATENT SOLICITORS, for obtaining Patents 
and Caveats, Established in 1860. Their long exiierieuce as 
journalists and large practice as Patent attorneys enables 
them to offer Pacific Coast Inventors far better service 'hau 
they can obtain elsewhere. Send for free circulars of infer 
mation. OBice of the Mining and Scientific Press an 
Pacific Rural PkeSs, No. 252 Market St., San Francisco 
Elevator, 12 Front St. 




SI / ,',/,' I, j; 



Winner First Prize, World's Fair, Antwerp, 188.5. 
A Breed, combining size, beauty, action and 
endurance establislied and reared unfler 
the patronage and direction of the French 
Coverninent. 

THIRTY JUST IMPORTED 

All approved by the Inspector General of the 
National Studs of France, and the get of 
Stallions owned by the French Government. 

120-page Catalogue of Oaklawn 8tud, free. 
Address M. yv. DUNHAM, 

Wayne, DuPage Co., Illinois. 



Sawing fi^de Easy. 

UONABCH LLQEXSnHQ SAWLSQ 3[ACHmB 

SENT oisr 

30* I>^YS' 

TEST TRIAL. 




For logging camps, wood-yards, farmers getting oufl 
Btove wood, andaU Airtsof loK-cTittuig-it is uiir«*«icd. 
37ttm««iub sM varly. A boy of 16 can saw logs fast and 
eosT. Immense saving of lobor and monej-. Wnta 
foreleaantly lllustrat«l catalogue m6 brilliant colors, 
also brilliantly muminated poster m 5 colors. AU Iiee» 
AKents Wanted. Hiit vumcy vfide guickiy 

UOUASCB MFa. CO., C^FEKTESTIIJ^E, itl. 
THE MONARCH POTATO DIGGER for 
Sale by TRUMAN, ISHAM & HOOKER, 
Agents for the Pacific Coast, 421 to 427 
Market St., Sao Francisco, Gal. 






BUSINESS 
COLLEGE, 

46 OTarrell St.,Yoa" San FraEcisco. 

"OUR COLLEGE LEDGER," 

Containing full particulars regarding the College 
Departments, Courses of Study, Xerms, etc. will 
be mailed free to all applicants. 



CONSUMPTION. 

1 have a positive remedy for the above diseasn ; by Its oso 
thousands of cuses of the worst kiici and of Innff siandln(j 
have been cn red- ltidee<l. so srronL' Is niy fiiith in its efficacy 
that I will send TWO BOTTLES FUEB, toRctlicr with a VAL- 
CABLE TBEATI.se on this disease, to. in v suff'eror. Give ex- 
press li £, O, aduresii. Dli, T, A. SLOC Uil, m rearl SU N. H 



T^HE Sign of the Arkansaw Cough 
f- Syrup is looking you ail square in the 
face. 

Do yon want a sure, safe and reliable 
Cough byrup? Are you troubled with a 
Cough, Cold, Bronchitis or Lung Com- 
plaint ? Do your Babies keep you awake 
1 iV^hfwith Hacking Coughs, VnkU in 
the Head, etc. Do you want 'jonielhing 
reliable in the house to uvet these 
emergencies ? We an.swer to all : " Go 
to vour Druggist and got a Battle of the 
Arkaneaw Cough Byrap, and be troubled 
no more." rrico. 50 cents per Bottle! 

For Sale by all Druggists. 



Only Perfect 
Body Battery 
cveriuvent'd 
GivesauElec 
trie Current 
withorwiTH- 
OUT ACIDS. 
Electric Suspensory 
FKEE with every Unit 




ELECTRIC 

BELT 

Best MadeI 
Chronic Dis- 
eases of both 

KEXKSCur«d 

fhoutMi'dioine 
tab. 1H7.5. Send tor 
Free PamphIetNo.2. 



Address. WIACNETIC ELASTIC TRUSS CO.. 

304 NORTH SIXTH STREET. ST. LOUIS MO . 
704 SAC'MENTO ST., SAN rKANClSCO. CAX. 



Ppilit Fnnpouinnc The finest, best and cheap- 
null tliyi dVlliyb, est Photographs and En- 
PHOTOGRAPHS, KTC. gravinga of Fruics, Vege- 
tables, Houses, Farms, Landscapes, etc,, made by S. F. 
Pbotooravinq Co., 659 Clay St., S F. 



PRICES: 

g.ft. wheel 82.'5 00 

10-ft. wheel 31) 00 

12-ft, wheel 35 00 

14-ft. wheel 40 00 

PUMPS. 

2- Inch $15 00 

2J-lnch 15 50 

3- Inch 16 50 

3i-Inch 17 50 

4- lnch 20 50 

These Pumps are 
complete and will 
work in wells of any 
depth and force water 
to anv bight. 

r)WER, complete, 
00. 

ffi') 





WINDMILL 

Is the cheapest ever 
offered to the trade, 
and aa efficient and durable as 
the most elaborate self-regu- 
ators. Ifc is intended to run 
constantly, and turns on the 
stand facing the wind, from 
whatever direction. 

The wearing parts are few 
and cheaply replaced. Re- 
quires little or no attention. 
Will raise 25 per cent, more 
water than any 
_ * 'self -regulator" of 
^^5^ same diameter of 
-^^^ wheel. Anyone can 
^^jg^putit up. 
^-jjll^^l^g^ Write for Cii> 
^ ' culars to 



BYRON JACKSOU "-^^ ^-^''^^ 



San Francisco. 



THE JACKSON 

VINEYARD HARROW 

Rotates either way, at the will of the driver, 
and by driving the slow side next to the vine 
or tree, there is no danger ot hurting it, as 
the Harrow will roll gently around the tree 
or vine. 

It has half-inch steel teeth, and is made to 
rotate either way by simply changing the 
cast-iron weight from one side to the other. 
The Harrow weighs 170 lbs., and can be 
taken down and packed closely for shipment. 




STEAM ENGINES, 

STATIONARY ENGINES, 

Upright and Horizontal. 

PORTABLE & TRACTION ENGINES. 
IRRIGATING MACHINERY 

A SPECIALTY. 

Pfliniis for Irrigation anfl Eeclamation. ^ 

HARVESTING MACHINERY. WINDMILLS. HAY STACKERS 
and RAKES, IRON HARROWS. Etc. 

wRiT^mcu- BYRON JACKSON, SAN FRANCISCO. 





18 



f AClFie l^URAb f RESS, 



[Jan. 1, 1887 



Barren Hill Nursery 



NEVADA CITY, CAL. 

SPECIALTIES : 

NUTS, PRUNES, AND GRAPES. 

The Finest Collection of Nut-Bearing Trees 
to be found in the United States. 

1 9 Varieties of Walnuts, 

— INCLDDINO — 

CLUSTER WALNUT, 

Tlie newest, most prolific and valuable variety ever intro- 
duced into this country. 

PRCEPARTURIENS, 

Or Early-Bearing, or Fertile Walnut, introduced into 
California in 1871 by Felix Gillet. "Second Generation' 
Trees, grown from nuts borne on the oriqinaI/ tree; 90% 
guaranteed to be "genuine Pneparturicns," or' having 
retained the surprising characteristics of precocity, 
fertility and hardiness of the original Proopartu- 
riens. "Third Generation" Trees, grown from nuts borne 
on second generation Frajparturiens, entirely Cali- 
fornia-grown; vigorous, liardy and fertile variety. 

Serotina. Franquette, Mayette, Chaberte, 
Gant, Farisienne, Mesange Walnuts. 

The leading varieties of Europe, highly recommended 
for beauty and quality of the nuts, fertility and hardiness 
of the kinds. 

9 VarietieH of French Chextnnts or Marrons 

(Propagated solely by grafting). 
7 Varieties of Filberts. 

4 Varieties of April Cherries, the earliest and 
most proliSc in California. 

207 Varieties of drapes, including the very 
earliest Table varieties known, such as Blue Muscat, 
Ischia, Uagdeleine, Malingre, Pearl of Anvers, Bul- 
hery, Luglienda, Dupont, Gros Sapat, etc. 

81 Varieties of Knglish Gooseberries, all 
sizes, shapes and colors, and "true to name." 

PRUNES ! PRUNES ! 

Lot D'Entc, or "D'Ente true from the root." We have 
ourselves given tiiis name of "Lot D'Ente" to this type, 
80 extensivily propagated in the valley of the Lot 
(France). True from the root and not grafted, and 
which we have introduced into this country. This type 
of the D'Ente Prune is not at all propagated by grafting, 
which would do away with its chief qualities of being 
more vigorous, more long-lived than grafted trees, 
and a gum-resistant stock. 

Saint Catherine, "true from the root." — This kind 
is altogether propagated true from the root in its 
home, valley of the Loire (France), and offers greater ad- 
vantages than grafted trees, as being also more vigorous, 
more long-lived, and a gum-resistant stock. 

Wo highly recommend these two purest types of the 
two most celebrated kinds of French Prunes, and have 
divided our stock into three sizes, which we offer at $20. 
$30 and $40 per hundred. All such trees are import" 
from the two great prune districts of France, but have 
been from one to three years in our grounds, and have, 
like all our mountain-grown trees, a fine system of roots. 

For the Season of 1887-88, the D'Fnte, the 
purest and largest type of the Prune D'Ente, or D'Agen, 
or Kobe de Sergent (solely progagated by grafting). 

APRICOTS — Boulbon, Esperen, Dnclos, 
Mexico, the shipping varieties of the south of France. 

Constantinople Quince — The largest, most pre- 
cocious and prolific of all quinces. 

Ever-bearing Black Mulberry of Spain— 
Hedlar, Sorbus (all those kinds should have a place in a'l 
gardens). 

Mulberry Trees for Silkworm Feeding. 
Silkworm Eggs. 
SERICULTURE CHART, 50 Cts. 

tCg'Sead for General Catalogue and Supplement with 
Chapters on "Nut-bearing Trees" and "Prunes," illus- 
trated with '20 walnut cuts, 5 prune cuts, and numerous 
other cuts representing Medlar, iSorbus, Black Mulberry, 
French Chestnuts, Filberts, etc. 

FELIX GILLET, 

Nevada City, Gal. 



Fine Small Fruits a Specialty. 

CUTHBRRT RASPBERRY. 




BKST MARKET BEKUY KNOWN ! LarRe, 
Firm and Luscious, stands travel finely, hears im- 
mensely, and has two nrops a year; 75 cents per dozen; 

per 100. Also Strawberries, Blackberries, GooHeber- 
nes, Currants, etc., of tioest imported varieties. Prices 
on application. 

L. TT. McOANN, Santa Cruz. Cal. 



SPENCERIAN 
TEEl/ PENS 

Are The. Best 



Established 1800. 

USED BY THE BEST PENMEN 

Noted for Superiority of MetBl, 

CiiUormlty, unil DurabllltT. 

20 Samples for trial, post-paid, lo Cents. 

IVISON, BLAKEMAN, TAYLOR, & CO., 

763 and 755 Broadway, New York. 



J. N. KNOWLES, Manager. EDWIN L. GRIFFITH, Secretary. 



MANUFACTtrRKRS OP 



oils. 



WHALE OIL SOAP, 

STRONGEST MADE ON PACIFIC COAST. 
Especially adapted lor Vineyards and Fruit Orchards. 0FFICE^28 California St., San Francisco. 



If You Want to Save Money and avoid a life of trouble, buy Trees Free from Scale. 



CO 



WILLIAMS' 

SEMI-TROPICAL and GENERAL NURSERIES. 

300.000 TREES. 1,000,000 ROOTED VINES. 

FOR THE SEASON OF 1886-7. 



Applet, Pears, Peaches, Apricots, Nectarines, French and Hungarian Prunes, Plums, Figs 
and Cherries. Cypreen, Gums, Acacias, Ornamental Shruhs, Greenhouse Plants. 

8,000 WHITE ADRIATIC FIOS— The fij; ol commerce, home Kfown, for sale thecomluK 
s?aaon. Sixty varieties of Orapes, rooied and cuttings, including ail the best Wine and Raisin 
varieties. Catalogue free. 

P. O. BOX 175. Fresno, California. 



i 

-1 
-1 

e » 

-I 3 

> a. 



Kieffer't Hybrid, Le Conte and P. Barry Pears, at Reasonable Prices. 



-fSHINN'8 NURSERIES^- 

We offer to the public our usual excellent and well-assorted stock of 

FRUIT, NUT & SHADE TREES, 

SHRUBS AND PLANTS. 

ALL OUR TREES ARE GUARANTEED FREE PROM SCALE, 
and are grown without irrigation on new land distant from old orchards. 

We would call especial attention to our ''Bulletin'* Smyrna Fig, imported by us 
direct from the Levant and now proved, in numerous instances of fruiting, to bo the 

TRUE FIG OF COMMERCE. 

Send for Catalogue. 

SHINN & CO., Niles, Alameda Co., Cal. 



SEEDS! SEEDS! SEEDS! 



For- 1886 AXid. 1887. 

FRESH STOCK OF 



All of this year's growth, for sale at the GEO. F. SYLVESTER SEED WAREHOUSE, Nos. 315 and 317 
WASHINGTON STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. SAMUEL BRECK. Proprietor. 




S. W. Corner Kearny and Montgomery Avenue, San Francisco. 

rFree Oosch to and from the Hone©. J. W. BECKER, Proprietor. 



WKI^I* MINK 
ITiU 3IA<'1II.VKKV. Our Ar- 
Aeitiun Well Kncyvlopedia con- 
tains near 700 engravings, illiistratiug 
and describing all the practical tools 
and aiJplianccR used in the art of well 
sinking; diamond prospecting ma- 
chinery, windmills, ar- 
tesian engines, ]imui)S, 
etc. Edited by the 
"American Well 
Wor IcH , ■ ■ the largest 
manufacturers in the 
Hurlduf this class of 
machinery. We will 
send this book to any 
party on receipt of 2^ cents for mailing. Expert well drill- 
t r.^ and agents wanted. Address, The American 
Well Work*, Aurora. I11h„ C. S. A. 

PAINLESS PARTURITION POSSIBLE. 

eO.OOO Sold. TokolOBy, by Alice H. Stockham, 
M. D., is a SOBLB hook for a noble purpose. Sample 
pages FKKB. Cloth, $2.00; mor., $2.75. 

SANITARY PUBLISHLNG CO., Chicago. 





RUPTURE 

l'.>Mt,|V|-lVI-UI<-<lHI i;0 |>p. 

llurnr'nKI-Vtro-MniriK lli' lli ll- 



■ TruiM»,coiiil»iii('(l, (iu.ii (inmdtlio 
'only one in tjn' wi.i in u' ln iiitiii^; 
ecmitintmns F.lrrt rjr MniJtirtiO 
'irrmt. Scirtit illr. IN lu ti Ml I, Dniulile, 
..mfon.ililH ai.cl Kir.-, i n .■ . .\ void fmuils 
v.T!i.l"ilii-nn-il. s. imIsI iimh Lu namiihlot. 
AI.>iO KI.FTt'TUIC ItKl.TS KOK 1M8K VSK.K. 
DK. HORNE, INVENT0B,702 MARKET ST.,$A.N FRANCISCO. 



I CURE FIT$| 

"When I htiy euro 1 do in»t moan niurPly to Btnp tTiom U)r h 

II mo and theahavo t)ipra return acaiii, I mean anidlcal euro. 
I !i!iv(i minlo tlio disease of FITS. KPII.KPSY or FALLIN(* 
SICKNESS a lifo-lnnK flin.lv. Iwiirrntit my remedy to nini 
the \v<irsC cases. Bocmiso ullinrs Inivn fulled Is no ryJtson for 
not now receiving a euro, tiernl at oaco lor a treRtlBe an<l a 
Free Bottle of my infallible remedy. Give Express and Post; 
Offlco. It costs you nolhini; for a trial, and I will cnro you. 
IT Address Pr, U. O. BOOT, ISS Pearl St., New York. 



H. P. GREGORY & CO, 

SOLE AGKNTS FOR 

WEBBER'S CELEBRATED 




IRRIGATING 



r»xjivi:3F»s. 



Wb also carry IK STOCK TUB Larokst LlNIl Or 

MACHINERY 

In the UNITED STATES, 

Consistin? of Wood and Iron Workine 
Machinery. Pumps of every 
description. 

ENGINES AND BOILERS 

A SPECIALTY. 



KENNEDY'S 



HORTON 

FAMOUS 

ENTERPRISE 

Selt-KegulatlDg 

WINDMILL 

Is recogrnlzed aa 

THI BlBT. 



Always gives satisfaction. SlltPLBi 
dTRONO and DURABLE In all parts. 
Solid Wrought-iron Crank Shaft with 
DODBLR BKARi.vag for the Crank to 
work in, all turned and run lo adjust, 
able babbitted boxes. 

Positively Self-Regulating. 

with no 00 springs, or springs o any kind. No little 
rods. Joints, levers, or anything of the kind to get out of 
order, as such things do. Mills In use to 12 years lo 
good order now, that have never cost one cent for repairs. 
Kl\ genuine Enterprise Mills for the Pacific Coast trade 
come only through this agency, and none, whether of 
the old or latest pattern, are genuine except those bear- 
ing the "Enterprise Co." stamp. Look out for this, as 
inferior mills are being offered with testimonials applied 
lo them vi'hich were given for ours. Prices to suit th 
times. Full particulars free. Best Pumps, Feed MUto, 
etc., kept In stock. Address, 

HORTON & KENNEDY. 

QENERAL OFFICE AND SUPPLIES (aa always befon 
LIVKRMORE, ALAMKDA CO., CAL. 

San PranclBCO Agency— JAMBS LINFOBTB 
lao Front St.. San Francisco. 





1,300 Engines now In use. 
40,000 Horse Power now running. 
Sales 2,000 H. P. per month. 

iVSend for Illustrated Circular and Reference List. 

PARKE & LACY, 

Sole Agents for Paclflc Coast & Territories 
21 and as Fremont St. San Francisco. 



MAIN & WINCHESTER, 

214, 216, 218. 220 BATTERY STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

DOUBLE AND SINGLE HARNESS 

Of Every Description. 

Saddles, Whips, Robes and Riding and 
Stable Equipments of every >-''nd. 

tySKKD FOR Illustrated CiTALOoui. 



Jan. 1, 1887] 



f ACIFie f^URAb f RESS. 



19 



Coin|iii33iop IMercliapt^. 



WM. T. COLEMAN & CO., 

Shipping and Commission 

MERCHANTS, 
Ban Francisco and New York. 



Receive oonsignments of Produce for sale In San Fran- 
cisco, New York, Boston, Philadelphia, England, Aus- 
tralia, etc. Make advances on approved consignments. 
Fill orders for staple goods in New York and other mar- 
kets. Effect fire and marine insurance in best offices. 
Charter vessels and engage freights for all trades. Agents 
tor line clipper ships from Philadelphia, China, etc All 
business has faithful and watchful attention. 



Zl. AC O IT" ^ X< . 

DALTOiTBROS.. 

Commission Mercl\ants 

AND DBALSBS IH 

OALIFORNIA AND OREGON PRODUCE, 

OBBBN AND DKIED FRUITS, 

Qraln, Wool, Hides, Beam, and Potatoes. 

808 and 810 DAVIS ST.. 
P. 0. Box 19S«. SAN FRANCiaOO 

CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. 



MOORE, FERGUSON & CO., 

WOOL, GRAIN, FLOUR 

— AKD— 

General Commission Merchants, 

810 California St., S. F. 

Members of the San Francisco Produce Exchange. 

/^Personal attention given to Sales and Liberal Ad- 
vances made on Consignments at low ra^es of interest. 



Oeo. Morrow. lEstablished 1864.] Geo. P. Morrow. 

GEORGE MORROW & CO., 

HAY and GRAIN 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

80 Ulay Street and 28 Commercial Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 
tr SHIPPING ORDERS A SPEClALTY.-fit 



O. L. BENTON & OO., 

Commission Merchants, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
Ponltry and Wild Game, 65, 66, 67 California 
Market, S. F. ^"All orders attended to at the 
shortest notice. Goods delivered Free of Charge to 
any part of the city. 

J. W. WOLF. RAI/PU BROWN. W. H. WOLF. 

WOLF, BROWN & CO., 

General Commission Merchants 

And dealers in California and Oregon Produce, 

321 Davla Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



WETMORE BROTHERS, 

Commission Merchants, 

Green and Dried Fruit, Produce, Eggs, Etc. 
Consignments Solicited. 524 & 52{1 Sansome St., S. F. 

P. STEIN HAGEN & CO.. 
Fruit and General Commission Merchants 

BKICX BT0RB8 : 

408 & 410 Davis St., San Francisco. 

WITTLAND & FREDRICKSON, 

Commission Merchants, 

All Kinds of Green and Dried Fruits. 
ceNSioNidKMTB 80LICITBD. 824 Davls St., S. F. 



PORTER BROS. & CO., 

Commission Merchants, 

404 and 406 Davis St., S. F. 
/19'Special attention paid to shipping. 



EVELETH & NASH, 

Commission Merchants, 

422 Front St., and 221, 223, 225 and 227 Washington St. 
Consignors receive the benefit of our large shipping trade. 



MISSION ROCK DOCK 

AND 

GRABN WAREHOUSE, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

1^ nnn tons capacity, np. nnn 

I U,\J\J\J storage at Lowest Rates. • «-»,V-'V-'Vy 

CHAS. H. SINCLAIR. Supt. 
Cal. Dry Dock^Co., props. Office, 318 Cal St. room 8. 



CLEAR YOUR LAND WITH JUDSON POWDER. 



PALAGXS 

DYE WORKS, 

633 Market St. under Palace Hotel, San Francisco, Cal. 

All kinds of Ladies* and Gents* Carments Cleaned and 
Dyed. WE EXCEL. Send for Circular of Prices. 

CHAS. J. Manager. 



RAILROAD MEN, FARMERS AND VITIOULTURISTS HAVE, 

by practical experience, found that the JUDSON FOWD£B egpeciallji Is the best adapted to REMOVE 
STUMPS and TREES. 

FROltl 6 TO no POUNDS OF THIS POWDER will always bring any sized stump or tree with 
roots clear out of the ground. The EXPENSE IS LESS THAN ONE-HALF the cost of Grubbing. 

In most instances. Giant Powder, ot any other "High Ib^plosive," is too uick, and ordinary Blasting Powder 
not strong enough. 

<VFor partToularg how to use the same, apply to 

BANDMANN, NIELSEN ft CO., Obneral Agents 

GIANT POWDER COMPANY, 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



GRANGERS' BUSINESS ASSOCIATION, 

SHIPPING ^COMMISSION HOUSE. 



OFFICE, 108 DAVIS STREET. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Warehouse and Wharf at Port Costa. 



CONSIGNMENTS OF GRAIN, WOOL, AND ALL KINDS OF PRODUCE SOLICITED. 

Money advanced on Grain in Store at lowest possible rates of interest 
Pull Cargoes of Wheat furnished Shippers at short notice. 

ALSO ORDERS FOR GRAIN BAGS, Agricultural Implements, Wagons, Groceries 
and Merchandise of every description solicited- 

B. VAN EVERY, Manager. A. M. BELT. Assistant Manager. 



McLean s orchard & field 

Awarded First Premium 

At the State Fairs of 1884, 1885, 
and 1886; also numerous 
County Fairs. 



CULTIVATOR 

THE FAVORITE. 



tS'Fot further particulars inquire 
of 



N. McLEAN, 
WatsonvlUe, 

Santa Cruz Co., 
California. 





The "ACME " subjects the soil to the action of a Steel Crasher and I,eTeler, and to the Catting, 
Lilfting, Taming process of double gangs of CAST-STEEL COUI.TEKS. the peculiar shape and arrange- 
ment of which give immense cutting power. Thus the three operations of crushing lumps, leveling 
off the ground, and thoroughly pulverizing the soil are performed at the game time. The entire ab- 
sence of Spikes or Spring Teeth avoids pulling up rubbish. It is especially adapted to inverted sod and 
hard clay, where other Harrows utterly fail; works perfectly on light soil, and is the only Harrow that cuts over 
the entire sarface of the ground. We make a variety of sizes, 3 to 15 feet wide. 

The "ACME" is in practical use in nearly every Agricultural County on the Pacific Coast, and has proved 
itself to be just the tool for use in VINEYARDS, ORCHARDS and GRAIN FIELDS. 

^Send for Pamphlet containing Thousands of Testimonials from 48 different 
States and Territories. 

Manufactory and Principal OfBce, MILLINGTON, N, J. 
N. B. —Pamphlet " TILLAGE IS MANURE, and Otuer Essavs, sent free to parties who name this paper. 
For Sale on the Pacific Coast by 

Arthur W. Bull, San Francisco ; Staver & Walker, Portland, Or., and Walla Walla,W.T. 




C. D. LADD, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer and Agent for all kinds of 

FIRE-ARMS, FIXED AMMUNITION, FISHING TACKLE, 

And Sporting OoodS of all descriptions. Send for Catalogue, stating Just what you want and 

where you saw this ad. Address, 

O. D. LADD, 529 & 531 Kearny St., - - - San Francisco, Cal. 



DEWEY fi5 CO., r&SL^WS S I PATENT AGENTS. 



HOLIDAY Musiv. 

FOR HOLIDAY GIFTS. 

No gift to a lover of music can be more appropriate, or 
give more enduring pleasure, than our excellent collec- 
tions of the flnt'st music, such as are here mentioned. 
Any book mailed promptly for retail price. 

CLASSICAL WORKS. 
Beethoven's Sonatas, celebrated Lcbert and Von Bulow 

edition, 2 vols., each $3, or cloth embossed, each §6. 
Mendelssohn's Songs Without Words, St. 00. 
Chopin's Mazurkas ($1), iiis Nocturnes (60 cts.); and his 

Waltzes (50 cts ). 
Franz's Album of Songs, $2.00. 
Haltdan Kjerulf's Album, S1.50. 

POPULAR COLLECTIONS. 
Choice Vocal Duets, $1.00. 
Minstrel Songs, $2.00. 
Rhymes and Tunes, $1.00. 
Young People's Classics for Piano, Jl.OO. 
Gems of Strauss, $2.00; gilt, $3.00. 

GOOD READING IN ELEGANT BOOKS. 
Hitter's Student's History of Music, $2.50. 
Mendelssohn's Letters, 2 vols., each $1.60. 
Rheingold Trilogy (Wagner's), 50 cts. 
Lives ot all the Great Masters, each from $1.50 to $2.00. 

XiaAS CANTATAS. 
King Winter, 30 cts. Caught Napping. 30 cts. 
Christmas Gift, 25 cts. Message of .Xmas, 30 cts. 

Sk.md for Lists. 

OLIVER DITSON & CO., Boston. 



C. H. DITSON & CO., - 



807 Broadway, New York. 



Imsdn SlHamiin 



ORGANS. 

Highest Honors at all Great World's Exhibitions foi 
nineteen years. 100 styles, $22 to $900. For Cash, Easj 
Payments, or Rented. Catalogue, 46 pp., 4to, free. 

PIANOS. 

The Improved Method of Strlntcing, Introduced and 
perfected by MASo>f A: Hamlin, is conceded by com. 
potent Judges to constitute a radical advance In Piano, 
iorte construction. 

Do not require one-quarter as much tuning as PlanoE 
generally. Descriptive Calalofrtie by mail. 



164 Tremont St., Boston. 149 Wabash Ave., OhioagOi 
46 E. 14th 8t. (Union 3q.), N. Y. 



J. L. HEALD'S 

AGRICULTURAL WORKS, 

Crockett, Contra Costa Co., Cal. 

Stationary Engines and Boilers. 

PortaWe Straw-Bnning Boilers & Engines. 

IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS. 

Machinery ot all kinds furnished at shortest notice. 

Heald's Patent Wine-making Machinery, 

including Grape Crushers and Stemmers, Elevators, Wine 
Presses and Pumps, and all appliances used in Win* 
Cellars. Irrigating and Drainage Pumps. Heald's 
Patent Enaine Governor, Etc. 




HENLEY'S 

IMPROVED 
MONARCH 

FENCE 
MACHINE. 



Patented July 21, 1885, May 18, 1886, August 3, 1888. 
The only practical machine in use that makes the fence 
in the field wherever wanted; makes the best, strongest, 
and most durable fence for general use and farm and 
stock purposes; weaves any size picket and any size wire. 
The fence will turn all stock without injury to same. 
For catalogue and full particulars, address 

M. C. HEMT.EY, Pole Manufacturer. 
Fnctirv. 523 to .'133 North Iflth .«t., Riehmoiiri Ind 




HORSK POWKKS, WINDMIJLL.'s, r.\NK.'4 
and all kinds of Pumping Machinery built t" order. 
Awarded Diploma for WindniillH a< tl... 
eliaiii<:s' Kair, 188/5 Windmills from $()5. Horse 
Powers from $,50. F. W KROGH & C« »., 51 
Beale Street. San Francisco. 



BRICK 

AND 

TILE 



MACHINERY 

BEST IN THE WORLD. 

ml for circular vV. prices. 




WEAi(, NERVOUS PEOPLE 




In eve; 
Electric 
yf.ai'S. -Who 
tSuMnciiMiirlcM 
itacioMs luiil I 
Jtiipt II 



And others suffcrlntr from 
nervous debility oxhiuiMtinp: 
chronic diseases, prenmture 
tlecUno of youncr or old are 
positively cuicd by Dr. 
Home's famous Klcctro* 
MiiKHctlc Udt. Tlumsnnds 
Stjilo In the Union Imvo been cured. 

li'<l niid Kokl 10 
Kit. Klcctrio 
iimIo Ik IIs Avoid worthless Im- 
l>.iriics. KU'Ctrlc TruMMcH for 
.Send stiiiiip I'or piiinphle' 



liiMlly I'ell. V: 



OR. HORNE, INVENTOR, 702 MARKETS!. , SAN FRANCISCO. 



Sample Rook nf bcaulinil cards, 11 Games, 
tricks in ma^u:, -l.'Wi Album verses. All for 
tt 2c. stamp. STAB CABD CO., Station IB, OUa. 



NEW 



20 



f ACIFie I^URAb f RESS. 



[Jan. 1, 1887 



HAWLEY BROS. HARDWARE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN HARDWARE AND AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

PERKINS' WIND-MILL. 



The Celebrated SCHUTTLER Wagons. 



THE BEST WAGONS 

IN TlIK 

Made expressly for the 
Western Coast of Amer- 
ica. Warranted to with- 
stand dry climates and to 
wear longer than any 
other wagon manufac- 
tured. 



STRONG, DURABLE, 

OK 

LIGHT DRAFT. 

Made of the best ma- 
terial by experienced 
workmen, in the most 
approved manner of con- 
struction. 

THEY ARE THE PIONEER WAGONS of the Pacific Coast, and especially adapted for 
the hard usage to which wagons are subjected here. 





EVERY MILL WARRANTED. 



OUR "SOUTH BEND" CHILLED PLOWS 

CANNOT BE EQUALED FOR | I I 11 |\ I 

Ligltfless of Dralt, Quality of Work, Ease of Handling and Adinstmenl, aDi General Conslrnctlon. UUrl IN 

WARRANTED TO GIVE PERFECT SATISFACTION. 

Look for the Name, " South Bend OhlUed Plow," on the Beam, and take no other. 



PRICES GREATLY REDUCED. 

The frennine Perkins' Wind-Mill has earned a reputation for 
excellence that will be maintAined. It is unquestionably the most 
perfect and beautiful Wind-Mill in the market. 

Perfectly noiseless, eaey and graceful in all their movements. 
Positively Self-Regulating, with no coil spring or springs of any 
kind, no little rods, joints, levers, or balls to get out of order, as 
such things do. Mills in use six to twelve years in good order now, 
that have never cost one cent for repairs. 

^Send for Special Circctlak. 



DEERE MOLINE PLOWS. 






THIS CUT REPRESENTS OUR Nos. 1 and 1 B ONE-HORSE PLOW. 



THE LEADING PLOWS ON THE PACIFIC COAST. 

We take pleaBure in oallinn special attention to our recent improvements in the construction of Ph)W8, whi'^h 
oneist of a brace croeisit and Weldrd Solidlt to thr Standard, extending; down and bolted to the landside. 
affording a firm brace to the standard and ^ivin^ much greater wtreni^th than will be found in any other se''. up 
nandle plow. Jt also extends up .vid bolts to the handle with two X bolts, producing the best braced and finest 
plow nia«lu. 



SOLE AGENTS FOR THE "NEW DEAL 

The Celebrated 



GANG PLOW, "KEYSTONE" DISC HARROWS, H. W. DAVIS & CO. BUGGIES, Etc., Etc. 

in all Varieties. 



HAWLEY BROTHEES HARDWARE COMPANY, San Francisco, Cal. 



YERBA BUENA JERSEYS. 

REGISTERED IN THE AMERICAN JERSEY CATTLE CLUB OF NEW TORK. 



~ o 
LU ~ 

CO !« 



C0 




S en 

- c: 

B m 

« 30 

O ~ 

$ C/5 

S m 



WINNINGS AT THE PAIRS OF 1885: 

At State Fair, Sacramento, 



El even First Prizen in Classes for Age. 
One Second Prize in Classes for A^'e. 



UKKD rRIZBS. 



Best herd of thoroughbred Jersey Cattle over 2 years old. 
Best herd of thoroughbred Jersey Cattle under 2 years 
old. 



Best herd of thoroughbred Guernsey Cattle of any age. 

BWEEPSTAKBB. 

Best bull, and three of his calves of any age or breed- 
Jersey bull "Jack Lowe" (T.'ilS). 
Also, the Gold Meda! awarded by the State for most 
meritorious exhibit of honied animals. 
At Golden Gate Fair, Oakland. 
One Second Prize in Classed for age. | Seven I'irst Prizes In Classes for age. 

Herd Prize, comjieting against Ayrshires and Devons Also, Herd prize, compotiiiK against Ayrshires and 
over 2 years old. | Devons under 2 years old. 

RECORDS OP FOUNDATION STOCK. 
MARY ANNE OF ST. LAMBERT, 36 tl.9. 12J ozs. 1 [ JERSEY BELLE OF SCITUATE, 25 Itis 4l ozs. 1 week' 

week, A. J. C. C. test, f>G7 lbs. 14? ozs. in 11 months. Her likeness above. 

TT\» m,- oT lAUDc-un' -in oi ■ > . , El'ROTAS, 77S Itis. Iti U months. 

IDA 01 ST. LAMBEKl, 30 lbs. 2J ozs. 1 week, A. J. C. moN PLAISIR, m " s- in 1 week. 

C. test. I PRINCESS 2d, 40 n.s. Vi\ ozs. in 7 days. 

Blood Relatives of the above Oows, Young Animals of Both Sexes, for Sale. 
HENRY PIERCE, San Francisco. 



^^i^^^gQ^ ROSES 



3 



PLANTS 



<y A> 

^ /g' FRUIToxORNAMENTALTREES, GRAPE VINES 

OR ANlfTHING IN THE NITRSKRY LINE, with.iMt first ^^ ritine 
for our valuable FREE Catalogue, the | 21 LARGE GREENHOUSES 
BEST we ever issued, containing the Barest New and I 33c| YEAR 700 ACRES 

Choicest Old. THE STORRS & HARRISON CO.' PAINESVILLE, OHIo! 



Feed the Land and it will Peed You ! 



FERTILIZERS and IRRIGATION. 



THE CALIFORNIA BONE MEAL AND FERTILIZER CO. 



-MANUFACTURERS OF- 



CALIFORNIA FERTILIZERS. 



SPECIAL FERTILIZERS FOR ALL CROPS. 



Oar Fertilizera lessen coat of irrigation, increase the yield, improve the quality of crop, and 
are cheaper than barn-yard manure. 

Circulars containing prices and full information mailed free to any address. 

CALIFORNIA BONE MEAL AND FERTILIZER CO., 

Office, 1 1 6 California Street, - - San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. 



1 O Lovely Hidden Name Cards, with name covered by 
I ^ Jhandfl holding tiowerfi, etc.. Impuktku from (Jrr- 
MANY, for 15 ct8. 12 extra fine <_iold Bevel Edpo Cards, 
with name, I.'} tct8. A)t;cnt8' OutHt sent free with each 
order from this ad. provided you cut out and return me 
the ad. and a^rec to act as my agent G. W. TUTTI/E, 
Paaadcna, CaL 



ORANGE 

culture! 



A practical treatise by T. A. Caret, 
j.nving the results of lonu experi- 
ence in Southern California. 196 
pa^es, cloth bound. Sent post-paid 
at reduced price of 76 cts. per copy 
by DEWEY & CO., Publishers, S. F. 




GOULD'S 

SPRAY PUMP. 



This Pump we have gotten up expressly for spraying 
vines, fruit trees, etc. , infested with destructive inseetx. 
It has been ailopted and recommended by the State Horti- 
cultural Society. The working parts are constructed en- 
tirely of Brass, aud will not bj affected by the corrosive 
solutions used. The BAMBOO K.Vl'ENSION is an a<l- 
iiiirable invention. Th"" operator, by the use of this ex- 
tension, can tret to all parts of the tree while on the 
^iround; also saxin^ himself from i^uttin); burnt with the 
solution. The improved nozzle will save the price of itself 
within a day. It throws a very fine mist. We have also 
m attachment for Pump to stir up the lii|uid in barrel be- 
fore putting on the solution, thus keeping the li<|uid always 
in condition to be laid on evenly, and not atlowlD^ the 

fireparation to settla at the bottom. Send for special Cata- 
opue. 

S We are prepared to lit these Pumps complete with Hose, 
f Bamboo Kxtenqions, Barrel, all ready to coumence spray. 
' iii(r with. Write for prices. 

WOODIN & LITTLE, 
509 & 511 Market St., San Francisco. 



T'WElSrT'Y - I^^O-E EIDITIOISr. 



Vol. XXXIII.-No. 2.] 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 8, 1887. 



/ $3 a Year, in Advance 

( SiNciLE Copies, 10 Cts. 



Essex Swine. 

There is some progress being made with Essex 
swine in California, and there are several very 
good, though small breeding herds of pure breds 
in this State. The Berkshire have the lead by 
prior introduction, and they merit their popu- 
larity; but for sake of variety as well as for 
their intrinsic merit we would like to have the 
Essex better known. We have on this page a 
good engraving of a pair of Essex swine from 
the herd of W. J. Neeley, of Ottawa, 111., who 
was the first Western 
importer and breeder 
of this breed in this 
country. The boar is 
imported Greenbush 
and the sow a thor- 
oughbred, the name 
of which we have not 
at hand. As the en- 
graving shows, the Es- 
sex hogs are perfectly 
black, and are, in this 
respect, different from 
the Berkshires, which 
have small white 
markings. 

The improved Essex 
swine of to-day are be- 
lieved to be the result 
of crossing the Nea- 
politan hog upon the 
original Essex, and 
afterward breed ine 
and selecting towaid 
the present type which 
is now fixed. Other 
characteristics s cured 
by intelligent breei iog 
have been early ma- 
turity, a quiet dispo- 
sition, tendency to 
fatten well, and to 
reach a very respect- 
able size for a small 
hog. In fact they are 
claimed to be the larg- 
est of the small breeds 
and to reach 300 to 
400 pounds at one year 
old when well fed. As 

bred now they are described as follows : " Color 
black; face short and -dishing; ears small, soft 
and erect when young, but droop somewhat 
with age; carcass long, broad, straight and 
deep; hams heavy and well let down; bone fine; 
hair ordinarily rather thin. Fattening qualities 
superior; prolific breeders and fair nurses." 
With all these excellent qualities the breed has 
not generally been popular in the Western 
States, mainly on account of their lack of 
great size. They are, however, growing in 
public favor. For crossing with the large, 
coarse breeds they are especially useful. Of 
course, in Cilifornia, where the large hog is not 
BO greatly desired as east of the Rockies, the 
Essex is quite large enough. We should like 
to hear from California Essex breeders. Rec- 
ords of their experience with the breed would 
be read with much interest. 



Fruit Shipping. 

On page 30 of this issue may be found a state- 
ment from Mr. Hatch, president of the Fruit 
Union, concerning the views which the di- 
rectors of that organization take of the present 
situation; also, the changes in the by-laws 
with which they propose to meet the prevailing 
views on policies to be adopted. We have re- 
ceived a strong protest from one fruit-grower 
against the last clause of Section 10, as printed 
in the Rural this week, as calculated to work 



enough copperas added to change the color to a 
deep green. Some cheap glue was added to 
make it adhere to the trees. Neither rabbits nor 
mice would touch the trees thus treated. 



Grape-Growers' Meeting. 

We attended the meeting of the Grape- 
Growers' Association which was held on Tues- 
day of this week, at the rooms of the Viticult- 
ural Commission in this city. There was a 
large representation of those engaged in the 




THOROUGHBRED ESSEX SWINE— IMPORTED GREENBUSH AND CONSORT. 



A SINGLE sale of 17,000 orange trees was 
made by a San Bernardino nurseryman, re- 
cently, to the repreupo^tjve? of ft Qolopy from 
Qbic»go, 



spurious wines, it being claimed that the amend- 
mentb legalize just what it was intended to pre- 
vent. Apparently the meeting lost confidence 
in congressional aid in this direction, and, fol- 
lowing Mr. Estee's advice, will make an effort 
to induce the California Legislature to define 
pure wine, and afterward seek the same act by 
Congress. A motion was carried appointing 
Messrs. Mclntyre, Doyle, Rixford, J. Kohler 
and Shillaber a committee to draft a spurious 
wine bill suitable to the California growers and 
present it to the Legislature for passage. 

At the afternoon session Professor Hilgard 
delivered a lecture on different methods of fer- 
mentation, of which an outline will be issued in 
a University bulletin. It was decided by the 
directors, before adjournment, to call a great 
convention of the winemakers of the State for 
March Ibt and four following days. 



Dr. Sanborn stated last winter, at a meeting 
of the Illinois Horticultural Society, that he 
protected from rabbits and mice his 600 pear 
trees with a >v^b of liine afi4 water, with 



wine branch of the grape industry. The morn- 
ing session was occupied with a discussion on 
pending congressional legislation on wine inter- 
ests. Much fault was found with the amend- 
ments which have been made to the bill against 
hardship and open the way for the introduction 
of favoritism. This is the paragraph which 
proposes to receive options for the control of 
certain markets by those who will bid most for 
the privilege. It does not appear to us that 
such a method would work well. We received, 
too late for printing on the same page with the 
other matter relating to fruit shipping, a letter 
by P. W. Butler, giving the views of the Placer 
county growers. This letter may be found on 
page 33 of this issue. It is time that all in the 
fruit interest were bethinking themselves of 
plans and methods for procedure. The meet- 
ing of the Fruit Union will be held January 
19th. According to the statement by Mr. 
Hatch, it will be an open meeting for all in the 
fruit interest, though, of course, the right to 
vote is restricted to members of the Fruit Union, 
on wbo^e stock assesemeats l^^ye l)eea paid up. 



Harvesting Corn by Machinery. 

It appears that the Western farmers are get- 
ting tired of cutting up and shocking their 
maize, and weary also of the winter occupation 
of husking. They hasten to finish up the busi- 
ness, cutting with a reaper and then putting 
the whole growth through a grain separator and 
getting good husked and shelled corn at the 
spout. What has happened to the famous 
Western corn 1 It must have dwindled down 
considerably since the time when they had to 
use stepladders to 
gather the ears and 
axes to hew down the 
stalks. However that 
may be, the following 
is an item which we 
find in an Eastern ex- 
change: 

T. H. Wood, an en- 
terprising farmer south 
of Litchfield, Minn., 
this year tried an ex- 
periment with his 
field of over 60 acres 
of corn, that is worthy 
of more than a passing 
mention. When the 
corn became ready for 
cutting, he went into 
it with his self-binder. 
The only change he 
made in the machine 
was to attach the 
sickle-knives to a bar 
of double weight, the 
ordinary sickle bar be- 
ing considered too 
weak for the work. 
In cutting, where the 
corn was green and 
unusually heavy, he 
took but one row at a 
time, but where it was 
of ordinary growth he 
took two rows at a 
swath. The bound 
bundles were shocked 
up like wheat and 
permitted to stand in 
the shock until thrash- 
ing time, a few days 
ago, when he ran them 
through an old thrash- 
ing machine in the 
same manner as he 
would wheat. The re- 
sult was in the highest 
degree satisfactory. 
The corn was shelled clean from the cob. 
Some of the grains were broken, but for 
feeding and commercial purposes uninjured. 
Some of it he brought to Litchfield for mar- 
ket, and received five cents per bushel more 
for it than was being paid for corn in the ear. 
The stalks were broken up better in some re- 
spects than by a feed-cutter, and made excel- 
lent fodder. Mr. Wood says he shall continue 
to harvest his corn in this manner, and com- 
mends the process to his fellow-farmers as being 
cheaper and preferable in many ways to the or- 
dinary method of harvesting that crop. 

We do not suppose California will be long 
taking the hint in this direction. It may be 
that our stalks are too long and thick, but they 
certainly can have the advantage of perfect 
dryness, which must facilitate such an oper- 
ation. Perhaps some of our wide-awake invent- 
ors can devise an improved thrasher which will 
do the business for California corn. Perhaps 
we can have a modification of the combined 
harvester which will pass through the corn- 
fields delivering the shelled corn in sacks and 
the minced corn fodder in bales for stock-feed- 
ing. Harder things have been done before noWf 



22 



fAClFie f^URAlo PRESS. 



C(0RRESP0JSIDENCE. 



[Jan. 8, 1887 



Ciorrespoiidents are alone responsible for their opiuiong. 

Glimpses of San Diego County. 

(Written for the Ki ral Press by Gkokgie D. \V.] 

Southward of our gales of gold 
Two hundred leagues, as the tale is told. 
Two hundred years, near the Aztec sea, 
A city there was and again shall be. 

— Old legend. 
Entering at San Diego bay, we pass through 
a narrow channel between the almost perpen- 
dicular hights of Point Loma, with its light- 
house, and the peninsula, with its Coronado 
beach. Safe in the land- locked harbor, after 
a sail of some seven or eight miles, we find our- 
selves in port, and then, with a rustic's eye, 
take iu the city and its surroundings. 

The distant Mexican mountains on one hand, 
the San Bernardino range, topped by the snow- 
draped peaks of the San Jacinto on the other, 
form a very pleasing picture — one not easily 
forgotten. The city abounds in tropical fruits 
and flowers and dense shrubbery. It can al- 
most vie with Italy's famed " Bride of the Ssa" 
— the beautiful X'enice of song and story. The 
moonlight nights here are perfect. They have 
gondolas. Isn't a gondola a boat? Well, 
there are ever so many here. Any evening, 
when the wind doesn't blow, you may see those 
little crafts la/ily floating over the placid 
waters, or propelled by the light-dipping oars 
of the boatmen, freighted with merry pleasure- 
seekers on their way to or from the Coronados, 
Point Loma or some little isle they wot of. 

San Diego city is growing as rapidly as its 
most zealous admirers could wish. There have 
been a great many handsome residences put up 
lately. The Florence Hill, on the outskirts of 
the city, claims the finest, I believe. H. H. 
Bancroft, the historian, has a beautiful resi- 
dence up there. The hotels are all crowded, 
and still the cry is for more room. Several 
large hotels have gone up lately. I suppose 
they will see to it that room is provided for all 
who come. 

Only a few days in the city, as our way lies 
northward. In a private conveyance we soon 
reached the dry bed of the Sin Diego river at 
North San Diego, the present suburbs. Here, 
where the old monastery now stands, was 
founded the first mission, afterward removed 
further up the river, ^lut my pen must stop. 
The subject is very fascinating, but it has been 
so well and so enthusiastically written up by 
others of far better descriptive powers that I 
stand — as I stood before those grand old 
wrinkled palms, a century dead — in silence. 

After a visit through the monastery and 
grounds, we moved on northward over a good 
mountain road, past some of Sin Diego's pret- 
tiest valleys, which open out to the sea through 
breaks in the Coast Ringc that follows the 
line of the ocean all the way along from San 
Francisco. The first of these little valleys is 
Oordero, where the California Southern RUI- 
road has its first station, IS miles from San 
Diego. High mesa land rises on either side, 
the valley lying quite level only about one and 
a half miles wide from mountain to mountain. 
The slopes to those mesa mountains are being 
converted into ranches and homes by the new 
settlers. 

San Diego county generally is very healthy. 
It is semi-tropical, with all the advantages and 
minus the disadvantages of the tropic countries. 
In this mountainous region there is no miasma; 
no intense heat; no very cold weather (although 
the wind is very searching sometimts), but 
health on every passing breeze. Ay ! soft, in- 
vigorating breezes, whether they blow from 
the ocean laden with spicy southern perfume or 
come floating down from mountain pines. 



Trapping Gophers. 

Editors Pkkss:— The most favorable time for 
trapping gophers is during the rainy season and 
in summer before the ground becomes dry and 
hard. In order to trap gophers successfully a 
liberal supply of common sense and patience is 
very essential to the trapper. In the first 
place, the habits of the gopher must be studied 
and learned. It is well known that gophers 
come to the surface in the night, and generally 
close their holes in the morning soon after day- 
break. They frequently emerge again about 
noon, and a third time late in the afternoon. 
It is best to set the trap in an open hole, as the 
gopher will be sure to return to fill it. Still the 
holes may be opened if the dirt is still fresh, 
with a good prospect of the gopher's return. 
Therefore the trapper may make his rounds 
three times a day, as above indicated. 

In the second place, care should be exercised 
in preparing the hole for the insertion of the 
trap. The trapper should assure himself that 
he has found a straight hole for a distance of at 
least 10 inches, with no lateral branches, other- 
wise the gopher in pushing out the dirt will 
likely enough thrust the trap to one side, 
cover it up or spring it without being exposed 
to its grasp. 

In the third place, the trapper should 
be supplied with at least two varieties of 
traps — one for the larger gophers and the 
other for the smaller ones, The common 



iron gopher trap, which springs downward, 
is excellent for the former, and the small 
wire trap, which springs upward, is gener- 
ally successful with the latter. It is taken for 
granted that th« size of the hole is indicative of 
the size of the gopher. Either trap should be 
inserted nearly its full length into the hole, 
pressed down firmly, and a little dirt piled at 
the outer end to prevent its being easily pushed 
out. After the trap is set it is well to cover the 
opening with some grass or weeds. Sometimes 
the holes require a little enlarging, but care 
should be taken to make the fit as close as pos- 
sible, that the body of the gopher may be kept 
near the center, and thus more exposed to the 
prongs of the trap. 

In the fourth place, the trapper should be sup- 
plied with a small spade and a little gouge- 
shaped implement for trimming the hole. 

Finally, the trapper should be supplied with 
traps as numerous as the extent of the pest de- 
mands. He should not be discouraged by lack 
of success at first. Perseverance is as essential 
iu this work as in any other, and will generally 
win. We have in mind the successful capture 
of a big gopher after trapping for him a week, 
changing the trap two or three times a day; he 
had then destroyed about .50 hills of corn. How 
much damage he and his descendants might 
have done had not his career of devastation 
been interrupted, can only be estimated by such 
multiples as attach to the propagation of that 
particular species. U. 
Sanfa Cruz. 



public spirit of those three communities, ought 
to throw light upon the disputed question of 
how best to secure what is needed. If neither 
the Atlantic & Pacific nor the Southern Pa- 
cific evidence determination soon to build, why 
not build ourselves? Find out what it will cost 
and build it ! If the coast shows the capitalists 
of this county and Santa Cruz county that it is 
in earnest it can have enough stock subscribed 
for and enough money paid in to begin work 
within six months from this writing. 



San Mateo County Dairies. 

The Kedwood Times and Gazette has been out 
among the dairies and collected the following 
interesting statements : 

The ,San Mateo dairy of Messrs. Kinne & 
Daley occupies a sightly eminence. To the east 
it overlooks part of the Potrero, with the bay 
and a portion of Oakland beyond and the long 
sweep of the Mii-sion road from St. Mary's Col- 
lege to the San Mateo county line. To the 
south rise the rugged steeps of Mt. San Bruno. 
To the southwest and west unfold the fertile 
slopes of Colma, rising southward to the hights 
which overlook San Pedro valley, and sinking 
westward to Laguna Merced and the sandy 
dunes which wall it from the encroaching sea. 
To the north the land falls rapidly to the irregu- 
lar pass which forms the business portion of the 
thriving village of Ocean View, and then rises 
to the hights which run north across the penin- 
sula in a gradually lessening line until lost be- 
yond Lone mountain in the broad plateau south 
of the Presidio. In the very teeth of the west 
wind, and at the northern bastion of the county, 
so to speak, this little "castle of industry" 
stands, the first of the many milk dairies which 
have made San Mateo county the pure-milk 
purveyor of the metropolis. Within easy 
rifle shot of the San Mateo dairy is the 
dairy of Knowles Brothers, who have 
succeeded their father in the opera- 
tion of a well-equipped, well managed dairy, 
small, but good — a veritable multum in parvo 
of system, cleanliness and quality of output. 
Both these dairies feed the best of hay as well 
as plenty of bran, middlings and oilcake meal. 
At the Knowles dairy is in operation the first 
De Laval cream separator used in San Mateo 
county. This separator is an application of the 
principle of centrifugal motion to the extrac- 
tion of cream from sweet milk. The niilk is 
put into a tin tank so fast as milked, and when 
the required amount is in the tank it is passed 
therefrom and through the separator, run by a 
two- horse steam engine. The result is sweet 
cream, thick or thin as desired, and sweet 
skimmed milk, suitable for feeding to young 
calves or for sale to bakeries to be used in 
bread-making. Mr. Bart Weeks, of Pescadero, 
has also one of these separators in use. Mr. 
Coburn is about to put one in, and other large 
butter dairies will doubtless do so soon, in 
situations where the fuel supply justifies. The 
milk supplied to San Franciecu by the two 
dairies first noticed, by Jersey farm at San 
Bruno; by the Millbrae dairy and by the 
Howard dairy at S*n Mateo, as well, doubt- 
less, as that produced by many other smaller 
milk-shipping dairies in the county, is of ap- 
proved excellence. 

The writer has just returned from a trip 
along the coast from Half Moon bay nearly to 
Point New Year. No better dairy section ex- 
ists in the county. The milk product of this 
entire section readily might be sent to San Fran- 
cisco by rail — if rail facilities existed. Seven 
thousand gallons daily might be sent from the 
section between Pigeon Point and Half Moon 
bay. Civen a coast railroad from Santa Cruz 
to San Francisco and the problem of supplying 
the metropolis with pure milk will be solved 
for all time. We think we do not exaggerate 
when we say that the coast side of San Mateo 
and Santa Cruz counties cad easily supply San 
Francisco with all the fresh milk it is likely 
ever to need. The undeveloped dairying possi- 
bilities of that section are greater than have 
been even dreamed of. Rapid, sure and cheap 
transportation of fodder and of milk must come 
some day and ought to have come long ago. 
Let those who have most to gain in the matter 
— all of us are in some degree interested — do 
something. A mass meeting in Pescadero, 
another in Santa Cruz, another in Half Moon 
Bay, addressed by the intelligepce and the 



II[he gxosK *Y'aR°' 



Official Statement About Pleuro- 
pneumonia. 

It is telegraphed from Washington that 
Chairman Hatch, of the House Committee on 
Agriculture, has received from Commissioner 
Colman a reply to the resolution offered a few 
days since by Representative Sivinburn, of New 
York, in which the commissioner sets forth the 
difficulties of attempting to extirpate or to con- 
trol the pleuro-pneumonia scourge in the 
present state of the law and with the machinery 
at hand. He reinforces his recommendations 
previously made for more heroic methods, with 
additional arguments and statements. 

The resolution of Swinburn seemed to question 
the prevalence, if not the existence, of pleuro- 
pneumonia, declaring, in its preamble, that 
since the submission ot the commissioner's last 
report it has been denied that the contagion did 
exist, whereas that report said it did, and calls 
for full and explicit information as to the own- 
ership and locality of the infected herds, 
the number of animals which have perished and 
the steps taken to stamp out or confine the con- 
tagion. 

Extent of the Infection. 

The commissioner, at the outset, declared 
that some of the statements attributed to his 
report were not contained in it, and proceeds to 
show that the summary by the Chief of the 
Bureau of Animal Industry of the discoveries 
made during two years was erroneously as 
sumed by Mr. Swinburn to be a statement of 
the condition of afl'airs at the present moment 
Commissioner Colman proceeds as follows 
" In reference to that part of the preamble 
which states that it has been denied, since mak 
ing the report, that the disease does not exist 
in the localities where it was reported to do so, 
I would respectfully say that my information is 
not in accord with the statement. If by locali- 
ties individual premises are meant, then the 
statement may be admitted to be correct, for 
with pleuro-pneumonia, as with all other con- 
tagious diseases, some herds are continually 
being rescued from contagion while others are 
continually coming under its influence. If, 
however, we use the word localities in the sense 
of States or counties, I see no reason to believe 
that with the exception of Kentucky and Illi 
nois there has been any material change. 

" As to the proportion of 1 727 affected animals 
which recovered and the proportion of those 
exposed which afterward became affected, 
have no information. An inspection was made 
to obtain the facts as to the extent of the dis 
ease, and it was impossible with few exceptions 
under the existing laws to keep the infected 
herds under supervision or to obtain any facts 
as to the subsequent history of the herds. 

"The publication of the fact of the existence 
of pleuro-pneumonia in certain herds without 
the adoption of prompt measures for suppress 
ing it caused so much damage to the owners 
that in many cases they not only refused to give 
any information, but prevented the examina- 
tion of the animals at subsequent visits." 

The commissioner then says that the only 
way to learn the fate of animals in such herds 
is to place a watch on the premises, and main 
tain it day and night. For 450 herds this 
would require at least 900 men, a force whicl 
it was clearly impossible for the department 
to employ, even if the expenditure were author- 
ized. 

Quarantine Ineffectual. 

As to the quarantine of infected herds, the 
report refers to the State laws, which are not 
such as to enable the department to enforce 
such regulations, there beiug nothing to pre- 
vent the removal of that part of the infected 
herd which has not yet shown symptoms of dis- 
ease from any State into any other State. 

The commissioner recommends emphatically 
that his department be given sufficient author- 
ity to overcome this difficulty, or that the work 
of eradicating the plague be left entirely to the 
State authorities. 

The report enlarges upon the difficulties in 
the way of effectively quarantining infected 
herds on account of the loss entailed upon the 
owners by the suspicion thus cast upon their 
product. In order to overcome such difficul- 
ties, it will be necessary to place a sullicient 
guard over every infected premises to prevent 
any men or animals liable to spread the con- 
tagion from mingling with the outaide world. 
The commissioner concludes that such a quar- 
antine would be so expensive and so intolerable 
to the citizens of this country as to make its 
maiotenauce impossible. 

He therefore recommends, wherever an 
infected herd is discovered, that all the exposed 
animals be slaughtered, the premises thorough- 
ly disinfected, and the owner compensated for 



the loss to which he is subjected for the protec- 
tion of the public. 

The report gives the history of pleuro-pneu- 
nrionia in Kentucky and illustrates the commis- 
sioner's opinion with incidents showing the im- 
possibility of making an effective quarantine, 
and representing that the slaughter of diseased 
and exposed animals and disinfection of the 
premises to Be the only way of extirpating the 
plague. 

Number of Animals Slaughtered. 

The report concludes with the figures giving 
the proportion of the slaughtered animals that 
were more or less affected with pleuro-pneumo- 
nia, which are of great interest because they 
demonstrate the advisability of slaughtering all 
animals once exposed to this contagion. Many 
of the affected cattle presented no symptoms of 
the disease before slaughtering, but the condi- 
tion of their lungs was such as to make it very 
certain that they were capable of disseminating 
the contagion for an indefinite period. 

The table referred to shows that from Novem- 
ber -iSth to December Kith, 2*271 animals were 
slaughtered, of which 1031 were found to be af- 
fected. Another table shows that in addition 
to these, .S.S2 small herds, numbering in all 1051 
animals, were placed in quarantine iu Chicago 
and vicinity from October 1.3th to November 
30th, all being in private herds and stables, and 
the greater part of which were quarantined be- 
cause of exposure to affected cattle grazing on 
the various commons about the city. 

What is the Reason of It? 

Euitors,Pres.s:— I recently bought a cow, 
15-16 Jersey; she was in poor condition, having 
been underfed both before and after calving; 
her milk is nevertheless rich, and for the first 
few churnings the butter came all right, al- 
though it took from three-quarters of an hour 
to one and one-half hours; it was very hard. 
The next time we churned for several hours, 
but the butter would not gather, although we 
could see it in the cream, and finally after two 
or three days we abandoned it as useless. The 
next time we were successful, but since then 
we have tried twice without success. We are 
quite unable to account for it. As to food, the 
cow gets a mash in the morning, two parts . 
bran and one middlings, and pumpkins three 
times a day (all she will eat with the seeds 
taken out), and has access to a stack of barley 
straw. She also has corn-stalks to pick over 
during the day, and hay at night (the latter is 
rather mixed, ordinary wheat, bearded wheat, 
and wild oats, but it is very free from weeds). 
She still keeps lean, but appears well and gives 
as much and as rich milk as at first. Can any 
one tell me what is the matter ? My wife has 
made butter from common cows for years; do 
Jerseys require different management in any 
way ? Am I feeding too many pumpkins, or is 
there anything wrong with the other food men- 
tioned ? 

Will some one be kind enough to tell me the 
proportions and ingredients to make a mash 
for young bulls, one year old ? Sucscriuek. 

Oiihserville. 



Hereford Cattle. 

Editors Press: — Not long since an allusion 
was made to Mr. Wm. Dumphy's cattle; as 1 
saw no reply to the inquiry, I will state the 
few facts I am in possession of. 

The herd were brought to San Mateo 
after leaving quarantine and grazed about one 
year. A portion were shown at the State Fair 
and at county exhibitions, and received prizes. 
No sales were made of, single animals to dis- 
tribute into the breed through the State. The 
original 16 had, at the time they were sold to 
Mr. Dumphy, increased to 20, and report was 
that the price was even §10,000 for the 20 head. 
I saw no notice of the sale, and as so many of 
your readers saw this exceptionally fine lot of 
cattle, it may be of interest to know that they 
were bought by Mr. Dumphy and taken to his 
ranch in Monterey county. I was enamored 
with them, and, through oouitesy, obtained the 
service of the bull Vanguard, and possess two 
nicely marked, deep red, thrifty bulls from 
deep milking Shorthorn cows. Others in the 
neighborhood have white faces from good milk 
stock, in all not exceeding ten head. These 
cattle should have a home in the grazing dis- 
tricts of our State. J. T. Hoyt. 

San Mateo. 




Bee-Keeping in the Hills Near Salinas. 

Editors Press: — A few miles north of 
Salinas, among the rich gravelly hills and nar- 
row valleys of the neighborhood of the San 
Miguel canyon, between the cultivated fields, 
there are considerable portions of country still 
in an uncultivated condition and partially cov- 
ered with wild flowering shrubs. Many or- 
chard trees flourish here, and during much of 
the year wild and domesticated flowers combine 
to furnish very fine bee forage. 

Saveral farmers are here partially devoted to 
bee-keeping. C. S. Swensen has about 250 
colonies; Mr. Rose about the same number; Mr. 
Cilkey about 80: Mr. John Webb 100; Mr. 
Adcock perhaps 200. Several other? bave a 



Jan. 8, 1887.] 



fACIFie I^URAIo fRESS, 



23 



few each. Mr. Swensen last spring started in 
with about 175, the other 75 colonies having 
been added during swarming time. An esti- 
mate based on this proportion will, it is thought, 
approximate the number of new colonies made 
among those above mentioned during the last 
swarming season. 

The past season was in this neighborhood not 
first-rate for the production of honey. The 
flowers of honey plants bloomed out rapidly 
during the heavy spring rains, and seemed to 
exhaust their vitality before the bees could do 
much; after the rains they soon dried Up. 
From the flowers of a kind of black sage 
the bees usually in spring make much first-clasis 
honey. Wild alfalfa, so called by the people of 
the country — a rather small shrub of the broom 
family — grows here in great abundance, blooms 
a little later than the sage, and was during the 
season the main dependence for honey-making. 

Mr. S. extracts and disposes of honey in comb, 
using section boxes for the purpose. He this 
season took from his 175 old colonies about 
3000 pounds of honey in the comb and about 
5000 pounds of the extracted. This is consid- 
ered a small yield for this region, but Upon 
comparing notes with his neighbor bee-keepers 
found It about an average yield for this season. 
Most of the bee-keepers above mentioned dis- 
pose of their honey in the comb. 

While most bee-keepers herein mentioned use 
the Harbison hive, Mr. Swensen uses No. 8 
Lingstroth, and believes it the best of all hives. 
He uses foundation for comb in the brood- 
chamber. The section boxes are Harbi- 
son's, sections one and one-half inches wide, 
with slight foundation start at top of each. 

Mr. Swensen's apiary has heretofore been 
badly subject to foul brood. He finally got rid 
of it by the following process : When he found 
a colony infested witli foul brood, he would 
first give the hive a good smoking and let the 
bees fill themselves with honey. He would 
then drive the bees to an empty box and shut 
them up for 72 hours, then put them into 
another box full of foundation sheets and feed 
them well with what is called medicated honey, 
after the recipe by Chas. Muht, which is fur- 
nished by Mr. Swensen as follows : Mix eight 
grains salicylic acid, eight grains soda borax, 
one ounce water ; then take honey (boiled 
about 15 minutes, preferred, taking off scum as 
it comes to top). To the honey add water by 
measure, in the proportion of one part water to 
three parts honey. Then add to each quart o* 
this honey mixture two ounces of the acid 
mixture. 

This treatment has, with Mr. S., proved very 
efficacious in ridding his bees of foul briod. 
Monterey Co. McH. 



Notes on Poultry Buildings. 

Editors Press: — I would like very much to 
have an interchange of ideas with some practi- 
cal poultry -raiser, in the matter of ventilation 
for hen-houses, or perhaps I had better say that 
I would like to have the ideas of some practical 
poultry-raiser in the matter, not that I have not 
some ideas which I am willing to put forth for 
the benefit of any one if he finds any benefit 
from them. My own practice at present, and 
for some time past, has been to leave in my 
houses, on the sides at the bottom, an opening, 
say two inches wide, and within a foot or so at 
each end of the length of the house, and if 
there should be any fear of skunks getting into 
the house through these openings, one can easily 
nail a lath or some narrow strip of something 
on in such a way as to do away with the possi- 
bility of their getting in and still not impede 
the circulation of air materially. For the top 
ventilation, of which I have satisfied myself at 
any rate that the fowls need very little, I sim- 
ply leave the space made by the rafters resting 
on the top of the house-side instead of being let 
in. That space and the thickness of the roof 
boards, at the sides and ends, furnish, in my 
view, all the top ventilation necessary or ad- 
visable. 

My first houses were in size 8x12, with a ven- 
tilation made by simply raisiug the last course 
of shakes four inches, by nailing on the end of 
the rafter, where the last course was to go, a 
piece of 2x4 scantling, and then nailing on the 
roof boards and shakes, and no ventilation at 
all at the bottom. The houses, by the way, 
were fitted with two roosts and were expected 
to furnish shelter for 50 or (iO fowls. Not be- 
ing satibfied with this, I niade a house with a 
lattice-work ventilation at the bottom of a foot 
in width, nearly the length of the houae, and 
lessened the opening at the top. I liked that 
better because the fowls seemed brighter and 
more comfortable, and, of course, did better — 
better health and more eggs. In short, after 
trying sundry other ways, I find that the way 
in which I make them now is best for all 
purposes. 

Also, instead of being 8x12, they are only 
4x6, but still are shed-shaped, as I find them 
the cheapest and easiest to make and as well 
suited to requirements of the fowls 
as any other, and if tastefully made 
are as nice looking. I keep not to exceed 
one dozen fowls in each house, having twq 
roosts lengthwise of fjhe house, with door in one 
end of the house and hole for fowls to go out 
and in at the other. Each house has its yard 
\^ feet square, with tfie house forming part of 



without going into the yard. I have kept sev- 
eral hundred fowls of different breeds in this 
way and in the same yards and houses for the 
last two or three years, and they keep healthy 
and productive, and they are incubator fowls, 
too, 

I did not intend to write so much as I have, 
and I had better cut it short at once. I have 
been in the business between five and six years 
raising eggs and broilers, still hatching by in- 
cubation and raising finely developed, healthy 
fowls, and make it pay. If you find this ac- 
ceptable, I hope it will call out some one full of 
good practical ideas. T. B. Geffroy. 

Lodi, San Joaquin Co. 

[These notes are of much interest, and we 
would like to have many more of them. We 
hope also that our poultry readers may have 
something to say upon the points advanced. — 
Eds. Press.] 



Distribution of Cuttings and Scions. 

University Experiment Station, Bulletin 
No. 62. 

The Standard Orchard of the University con- 
tains upward of 500 named varieties of fruit. 
The soil is not well adapted to the growth of 
fruit trees, nor is the bay climate of Berkeley 
calculated to foster the production of handsome, 
high-colored frnit specimens, except of apri- 
cots, which color better here than in the in- 
terior. Notwithstanding the disadvantages of 
soil and climate, we have, by the nse of barn- 
yard manure, which is abundant in the neigh- 
borhood, and by careful pruning and cultiva- 
tion, succeeded in growing fruit (especially late 
apples and pears) which, when shown in va- 
riety at the leading fairs, has received the com- 
mendation of the expert judges and the public. 

The Standard Orchard of the University is 
maintained not as a commercial enterprise, but 
to serve several purposes. First, that of illus- 
trating the instruction which is given in horti- 
culture; second, to serve as a means of identify- 
ing fruit specimens which are sent to us from 
all parts of the State for that purpose; third, as 
a source from which any citizen of the State 
can obtain scions or bud-sticks either for the 
purpose of testing varieties under the condi- 
tions prevailing in hia locality or to insert in 
bearing trees to establish the identity of un- 
named varieties which he may have. There is 
such variation in the characteristics of varieties 
grown under different conditions in California 
that often we can but approximately identify a 
variety and send scions of that variety, true to 
name, for the grower to fruit for himself and 
thus compare the two when grown under the 
same conditions. In all these directions the 
Standard Orchard at Berkeley is proving of 
value to the fruit interests of the State. 

The accurate records which have been kept of 
the tree growth and fruitage of the different va- 
rieties serve as a trustworthy guide for planting 
in regions adjacent to the bay and coast, where 
the climate in its main features most resemble 
that of Berkeley. The forthcoming report of 
the College of Agriculture for 1886 will contain 
tabulated results of several years' observations 
by Mr. W. G. Klee, from which the reader 
may learn what varieties promise well and those 
which are likely to be worthless in the section 
of the coast region to which allusion is made. 
From these observations it is also possible to in- 
dicate certain varieties which have good points, 
but evidently need a warmer locality to de- 
velop full quality. Such varieties are com- 
mended for trial at greater distance from the 
coast. 

Terms. — Orders may be sent for few or many 
varieties, as may be desired. We cannot fur- 
nish large quantities of a single variety, be- 
cause the object is to test varieties and not to 
furnish material for commercial propagation. 
Packages of scions are forwarded by mail, and 
applicants are required to send 10 cents for 
each dozen ordered, to defray expenses of 
packing and postage. Postal notes, payable at 
the Berkeley postottice, are requested to be 
sent in lieu of stamps whenever practicable. 
Any surplus left after filling orders as far as 
possible will be returned to the senders, de- 
ducting letter postage. 

The limits of an announcement of this kind 
prevent a full enumeration of varieties which 
can be furnished. We select, therefore, such 
kinds as seem to us most promising and least 
known to growers. Those who may desire 
other varieties than those named may apply 
for them, and they will be furnished if we have 
them. 

Apricots. 

Observations on the growth and bearing of 
our collection of apricots for several years war- 
rant the naming of several varieties as well 
adapted to bay and coast climates in this part 
of the State: Blenheim or Shipley medium size, 
color fine, early, very productive; Beauge, (?), 
very handsome fruit of Blenheim type, most 
beautiful golden yellow, painted with brightest 
red, rich quality, a clingstone., ripening here the 
middle of July; Orange, possibly identical with 
the BjOyal, but grown here, has much higher 
color, ^ good bearer and early, but the tree is 
only ^ moderate grower; Sardinian, !^ small 
apricQt, possibly valuable because of its earlj' 

D^SS. 

' ^ppigpts not pil|pge^her satisfactpry here b|}t 



likely to be valuable in warmer parts of the 
State : Alberge de Montgamet, large freestone, 
pitting very readily, color orange, flesh firm and 
rich; St. Ambroise, large, fine-looking fruit and 
tree large and vigorous: Kaisha, from Syria, 
pale colored, excellent flavor and quality and 
very juicy; Canino Grosso, fine, large fruit of 
Hemskirk type; De Coulorge, also fine fruit of 
similar type. 

Apples. 

The following varieties include the most 
promising of those in our collection which are 
not generally known in this State: 

Benoni; shaded and striped with red; midsummer; 
for table and market; very good to best. 

McCloud's Family; yellow; striped with dull red; 
late sunmier; very good. 

Fanny; crimson red; midsummer; very good. 

Julian; whiiish; striped with rich red; very good. 

Rt'd Canada; bmulifulred; winter; very good. 

Mother; splashed and marbled with red; winter. 

McAfee's Nonsuch; striped and splashed with 
red; winter. 

McLellan; red; beautiful; very good to best. 

Dalonega; striped and splashed on yellow ground. 

Green Sweet; greenish yellow; very sweet. 

Cardinal; yellow; middle of July; tree a fair grow- 
er; but yield here rather small. 

Count Orloff; pale yellow; rather a small bearer; 
but good quality and good keeper. 

Grimes' Golden Pippin; yellow; a fair grower; 
middle of September. 

IJisharoon; yellowish; dull red or russet cheek; a 
strong grower and healthy tree; fruit good and a 
good keeper; October and November. 

Duckett; yellowish; striped and splashed with 
red; winter; tree fair grower and fruit good. 

Equinetely; greenish yellow; covered and splash- 
ed with rich red; a fair grower and good bearer; 
fruit good, and keeps until March. 

Rome Beauty; shaded and striped with red; a 
good grower and bearer; fruit good, keeping till 
April. 

Dutch Mignonne; yellow striped and splashed 
with red; a fair grower and good bearer; fruit good, 
keeping until March and April. 

('anada keinette; large russet; a fair grower; fair 
bearer; quality good and a fair keeper; ripens in 
Septemter. 

Crab Appl's. — The University collection of 
crab apples shown at the fairs attracted much 
attention by their great variety in form and 
color. We can furnish scions of the following 
varieties: 

Oblong Crab, Montreal, Chicago, Cor.al, Red 
tiiberian, Yellow .Siberian, Currant, Transcendent, 
Large Yellow, Ringo, Malus Karda, Hewe's Vir- 
ginia, Lady Crab, Large Red and Hysops. 

Pears. 

Our collection of pears is very good, and the 
quality of many of our winter fruits, especially, 
excellen' ; but the presence of the summer fogs 
has the tendency to give them a russet surface. 
The same varieties grown farther from the coast 
will present a much handsomer appearance. 
The collections shown at this year's State and 
Mech inics' Institute Fairs were highly com- 
mended. The spraying of the orchard with the 
sulphide-whale-oil soap solution produced a 
marked effect upon the black fungus, and gave 
the trees and the fruit a much better appear- 
ance. 

In connection with the descriptions of the 
following varieties, of which scions can be had, 
we give the time of ripening of this locality, 
which, compared with the greater part of the 
State, is very late. Those starred (*) have 
proved exempt from the black fungus, or nearly 
so, every year since fruiting here: 

Annie Ogereau; very handsome pear; beginning 
of August. 

Otl; middle of August, before Scckel; small, but 
delicious. 

Uuchesse Precoce; above medium; a steady bear- 
er; (air quality; end of July. 

*Doyenne Robin; medium to large; beginning of 
September; good bearer; fair quality; excellent 
keeper. 

Dr. Reeder; small, but of the highest quality; end 
of September, beginning of October, after Seckel. 

*Paradise d'Autumne; September and October; 
medium size; very good. 

*i\1arie Louise d'Uccles; end of September; small 
grower, but a large and constant bearer; fruit large; 
good quality. 

*Sheldon; large; end of September; good. 

*ConseiIler de la Cour; large; regular bearer; 
good; middle of October. 

*Jalousie Fontenay Vendee; medium; good bearer; 
rerenibles in taste Bcurre Gris, of Europe. 

♦Pitmaston Duchesse d'Angouleme; a pear en- 
tirely different from the ordinary Duchesse; is later; 
large to very large; so far a shy bearer; good. 

*BAronne de Mello; medium; regular bearer; No- 
vember; good. 

Augustus Dana; large; November; very good; so 
far a shy bearer. 

*Beurre Gris d'hiver Nouveau (new gray winter 
pear); a variety, we are lold, which was formerly 
cultivated considerably in Santa Clara, but now not 
met with; large to very large; tree a good regular 
bearer; quality very good; November and December. 

*iVId. Lariol de Birny; large, good bearer; good 
(resembles Emil d'Heyst). 

*Janiinettc; above medium size; November and 
December; excellent keeper; good (extremely sweet). 

Fondante de Noel; above medium; very hand- 
some; December; good. 

*Jones Seedling; small; a good, steady bearer; 
October; good. 

Duhaniel de Monceau; December; above medium; 
very good; tree a poor grower. 

♦Doyenne d'Aloncon; late; ripening January i; 
good grower and healthy; yield fair; quality good 
and a good keeper. 

'Ueurre de I'Assomption; middle of August; fair 
grower and healthy; yield good; truit handsome and 
large, but not a very good keeper. 

Forelle or German Trout Pear; a fall paar of 
great beauty. 

*I^ouis Vilmorin; large pear resembling Clair- 
geau. Not adapted to coast climate; shoulc} \>p 
jriecl elsgwl^erej tree t)eal|hy and yjel4 faif, 



*De Tongres; very handsome; highly ^; a 

good keeper; fruit shown at the lairs attra h 
attention; tree healthy and a good grower. s 
here October ist. 

Plums. 

Scions of the following varieties can be fur- 
nistied: 

Ontario; the best early plum we have; green; 
above medium; quality fair. 

Black Morocco; small, blue plum; very early; 
cracks badly in this locality. 

Lawrence's Favorite; seedling of green gage; re- 
sembling it, but larger. 

Wangenheim Prune; resembles German prune, 
but bears better here. 

Red Magnumbonum; a good plum; rather large; 
freestone. 

Victoria; handsome, large; flesh yellow and 
rather coarse, but sweet; tree vigorous and healthy. 

Lombard; a popular Eastern variety; medium 
size; violet-red; flesh juicy, but not rich. 

Reine Claude de Bavay; one of the best varieties, 
which should be better known here; very late; 
greenish-yellow; flesh juicy, melting and rich. 

St. Lawrence; rather large; dark-purple with 
light bloom; yellow flesh; sweet and rich. 

McLaughlin; one of the best; large; skin thin, 
yellow, dotted with red; flesh yellow; very sweet and 
luscious. 

Prince Englebert; a good variety; tree very pro- 
ductive. 

Goliath; a large, handsome plum; deep red to 
purple. 

Copper Plum; an old variety; tree very product- 
ive, vigorous and hardy; fruit medium size; late; 
should be better known. 

St. Martin's Quetschc; a late prune from Ger- 
many; tree h.ardy and apt to overbear; fruit medium 
size; pale-yellow; hangs long on the tree; flesh yel- 
low; freestone. 

Peters' Yellow Gage; very good here; tree a strong 
grower; flesh yellow, juicy and sugary. 

Prince of Wales; an old variety; very satisfactory 
in this locality. 

Orange; very large and handsome; yellow; tree 
vigorous and productive. 

Belgian Purple, rather large, and deep purple; 
handsome; tree strong and productive. 

Drap d'or d'Esperen; fruit large; golden-yellow; 
flesh light-yellow and good quality. 

Ives' Autumn; an excellent plum; yellow with red 
dots; large. 

Royal de Tours; large; bright-red to violet; flesh 
high flavored; juicy; very good. 

Autumn Compote; large; whitish-yellow, with 
crimson in the sun; flesh yellow; very good. 

Diapree Rouge; tree rather a poor grower, but 
fruit large, reddish-purple; flesh pale-green, juicy 
and melting. 

Reine Claude Rouge; very good to best; is some- 
what known in this State. 

Denniston's Superb; an excellent variety; tree 
a strong grower; healthy, hardy and productive; 
fruit round and large; color pale-yellow. 

Mulberries. 

The mulberry plantation on the University 
grounds has made a fine growth during the last 
year, and a few cuttings can be had of each of 
the following kinds: Downing's Everbearing, 
Morns MulticauNs, Russian Mulberry, Moras 
Alba, and the Japanese varieties, Lhoo and 
Nagasaki. The last two have made especially 
fine growth. 

Grapevines. 
The climate of Berkeley is so unsuitable to 
the growth of the vine that no attempt is made 
by us to maintain a complete collection, which, 
in the absence of fruit, would offer compara- 
tively little interest. Moreover, the existence 
of the phylloxera ou the grounds renders any 
extension of the culture of non-resistant vines 
inexpedient, the small block or vineyard being 
maintained only for the purpose of experi- 
mentation in relation to the repression of the 
pest. We have, however, endeavored to se- 
cure as complete a representation as possible 
of the several wild stocks that possess, to a 
greater or less extent, the power of resisting 
the inroads of the insect, as stocks for grafting, 
to be used in localities already infested. This 
collection now embraces the following species, 
of which cuttings will be sent to those desir- 
ing to test them, on the same terms as other 
scions: 

American Resistant Grapevines. 

Vitis Arizonica; the wild .Vrizonian vine. 
V. Riparia; the Riverside grape of the Mississippi 
valley. 

V. Californica; the wild grapevine of California. 
V. Aestivalis; the summer or upland grape of 
the East. 

V. Candicans; the Mustang grape of Texas. 
V. Cinerea; an upland grape related to the Aes- 
tivalis. 

V. Cordifolia; the Southern Riverside grape. 
V. Vulpina; the Southern Muscadine, Scuppe- 
nong, etc. 

V. Monticola; the mountain grape of Colorado, 
etc. 

V. Neo-Mexicana; a wild grade of New Mexico. 
V. Rupcstris; the rock grn|)e of Missouri. 

Asiatic Vines, Presumably Resistant. 

V. Romaneti; white; Eastern Asia. 
V. Romaneti; red; Eastern Asia. 
V. Opiman; from Cashmere. 
V. Spino-Vitus Davidii, China. 
V. Katchcbourie. 

Huasco Raisin Crape. — This variety, im- 
ported .from Chile, has been distributed by us 
for some years and is now well spread in the 
State. We can still furnish cuttings of the 
variety in lots of 10 each, for experimental 
growing. The cuttings are, of course, carefully 
disinfected before shipment, although the vines 
hsJve never become infected. Reports regard- 
ing its merits as a raisin grape vary, although it 
appears to be a more reliable bearer than the 
Muscat, which it nearly resembles. 

Address applications to 

E. W. HlLOARD. 

University pf California, Berkley, Cal., JJeq, 



24 



f ACIFie [^URAb f RESS 



[Jan. 8, 1887 



JpATf^ONS OF ^USB;OcNDRY. 

Correspondence on Orange principles and work and re- 
ports of transactions of subordinate GTanKes are respect- 
fully solicited for this department. 

Railroad Pooling. 

A fanatical sect sprang up in England during 
the reign of Groin well, known in history as the 
Fifth Monarchy men. They held that the fifth 
great monarchy spoken of in biblical prophecy, 
destined to break and stamp in pieces all other 
kingdoms, had begun with the rule of that des- 
potic chieftain. There ever has been a strange 
belief founded upon a bit of Hebrew prophecy 
of a monarchy, diverse from all other kingdoms, 
that shall devour the whole earth, attempt to 
change times and laws and trample the people 
as grass. Prophecies and dreams may sometimes 
come true, but in a way the liveliest fancy 
little anticipated. What seemed to the rapt 
vision a goodly land at a distance, may turn out a 
heap of rock and sand, inhabited by wild beasts 
and savage men. 

Now all prophecy and romancing aside, there 
is steadily and silently spreading a mighty 
power in this land in the shape of a network of 
railroads extending from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific, and from Maine to the Gulf States; it 
is coiled around all the industries of the land 
with a tentacle fastened to every wheat sack and 
box of fruit. It is a power that has no cannon, no 
fortifications, and yet it levies tribute at its own 
arbitrary will, and is pushing out toward the 
north, south, east and west, crushing all in its 
way. It is a power that has no patriotism, no 
politics. While there is a full appreciation of 
the value of railways and of the dilfioulties of 
successfully operating them, the publis will 
never be convinced that it is wisdom or j ustice to 
leave this vast power to grow without check and 
regulation. That is the object of the Inter- 
state Commerce bill now before Congress. A 
recent dispatch says there is rapidly developing 
in the Senate a strong opposition to the measure, 
and if the short-haul and anti-pooling clause 
are not abandoned it will most likely suffer a 
defeat. But it is obvious that we must take a 
start, and the sooner the better. The people 
demand such legislation and there is no mistak- 
ing their will. The party or politician that 
heeds not the warning will be left to the cyclone. 
The measure will be a little clumsy at first, but 
experimentation is the only way to the right. 

But one thing is clear — the anti-pooling 
clause under no circumstance should be aban- 
doned. It is the pith of the whole question. 
The fact that the whole railroad opposition 
hangs on this peg ought to arouse suspicion. 
If railway managers can combine when they 
please for the purpose of preventing competition 
in passengers and freights, then the throne of 
a despot is planted in our midst. What is 
pooling but the plot of a minority to fleece the 
majority ? Forestalling in the provision market 
has ever been rigorously punished by law. At 
the present time the legislative mechanism of a 
great State is being evoked to suppress the 
combination of sundry coal companies to raise 
or depress prices at their caprice. Is there any 
difference between coal pooling and freight 
pooling ? Already coal pooling is indictable in 
some States as a criminal conspiracy against 
the rights of the people. Riilroad pooling is 
equally criminal in purpose, and should be 
made equally illegal. It may be more ditiieult 
to suppress, owing to its widely expanded in- 
terstate operation, but the R-iagan feature of the 
bill now before Congress makes railroad com- 
panies as easily arraigned before the proper 
courts as the coal companies now are in several 
States. It has been said that if this bill be- 
comes a law it will drive many weak railway 
companies into bankruptcy. Let them go. It 
is the inevitable law of trade. AV^hy should 
railroads combine to put up the prices in order 
to prop up the weaker companies, any more 
than merchants combine to prevent the failure 
of small dealers? Then it is the people that 
must always pay this advance of rates, and 
they have had enough of the monstrous usurpa- 
tion. Whatever modification this bill may re- 
ceive, by all means preserve the anti-pooling 
clause. It ie the vitality of the whole measure. 



Installation at St. Helena. 

Editoks Press : — St. Helena Grange met on 
Saturday, January 1st, at 10 a. m., for the pur- 
pose of installing officers for the ensuing year. 
Our hall was beautifully decorated with 
evergreens and mottoes appropriate to the oc- 
casion. We would have .been pleased to see 
some other members of the Order with us, but, 
unfortunately, the announcement had not ap- 
peared in season in all the papers. The in- 
stallation passed off well, after which all re 
paired to the lower hall to partake of the lunch 
which had been prepared. At 2 i'. m. the hall 
was thrown open for the reception of New 
Year's callers, and about 50 ladies and gentle- 
men responded. During the afternoon refresh- 
ments wore served, interspersed with music and 
social greetings. Everything passed off pleas- 
antly and was in perfect harmony with the 
delightful weather. Fraternally, 

Wm. Petebso.v, Sec. 
' St. Helena, Jan. 4, ISHr. 



The Senatorship. 

It may seem rather unkind to wish any man 
a hard road, but we must acknowledge that, in 
common with the people of this State, we are 
glad to see that Mr. George Hearst is not to 
have a smooth path to the senatorship. This will 
give the legislators a good chance to stop and 
think whether, on the whole, it is for the popu- 
lar interest to send a man to the United States 
Senate who could not possibly be chosen to such 
an office by vote of the people. We have had 
enough instances of choosing men by legis- 
latures whom the people would forcibly reject 
if their names came up at the polls. There is 
a strong movement in favor of amending the 
Constitution so that senators can be elected by 
popular vote, and it is well enough to ask how 
a candidate would stand by such a standard. 
We certainly do not want men to decide public 
questions who are so entangled in private and 
corporate interests that they cannot act dis- 
interestedly on great questions in the strug- 
gle of the people against the aggression of 
monopolies; we do not want for our advocates 
and judges on such matters the men who are 
the greatest monopolists in the country. 

The telegraph announces that Senator Stan- 
ford will speak agamst the Interstate Com- 
merce bill. Of course he will, and as president 
of a railway company it would be proper 
enough for him to do so; bat being such an 
officer, he speaks not as such, but as a repre- 
sentative of the people. It is one of the great- 
est inconsistencies of the day— the party ar- 
raigned pleading his own case, not as an offend- 
er, but as the judge. If we place George 
Hearst beside Stanford, we double the trouble, 
and between the two we probably succeed in 
representing all the oppressive monopolies 
which are crushing us. We have Stanford to 
smite us on one cheek, and seem to be turning 
the other for George Hearst to pound on. 

There is apparently a determined minority at 
Sacramento who do not approve of Mr. Hearst's 
candidacy for these and many other reasons. 
We certainly wish that they may make some 
impression upon the majority, which will result 
in a better selection lieing made. We hope 
there are too many independent men in the 
present Legislature to elect any man to the U. 
S. Senate for the principal reason that he has 
furnished the campaign funds that secured the 
success of any party. 



Grange Work and Progress. 

[Prepared Weekly by M. WurrsiiiuD, National Lecturer.] 

It is the design of these weekly columns to give 
not alone the words and thoughts of one individual, 
not to advance the Grange in any one direction 
alone; neither are they prepared for Patrons only; 
but rather to gather from as wide and vjrit'J a field 
as possible such ideas, lines of thouglit, work and 
progress as will illustrate the great mission of the 
Grange in the neighborhood, in the .State and in the 
nation; its social, educational and financi il features. 
Thus " line upon line," proving its principles true, 
its aims its work success/a/. Sent forth with 
the hope that they will encqprage the despondent, 
strengthen the strong, and secure not alone the 
good wishes and respect of our unorganized farmers 
— but ihdr /le/p by joining with us and working 
with us for home and farm and native land. 

It is a fact too plain to be longer disguised, that 
the wealth produced by the masses is gathered in by 
a few men, when compared with our nearly 6o,ooo,- 
coo of people, and alter it is so gathered, consol- 
idations and monopolies are formed to control the 
political element, elections, legislation, courts and 
government to an alarming extent. I'his evil should 
be corrected — it must be corrected — or our American 
liberties will soon depart forever, and the American 
farmers become the serfs of a moneyed aristocracy. 
The only remedy is organization and education. 
The Grange is the organization and its highest ob- 
ject is education. 

Excursion rates were refused the Patrons of 
Indiana for their State Grange meeting last month 
by the " Central Traffic Association," composed of 
30 different railroads, because said association had 
agreed to issue them only to the following classes of 
societies: Religious, benevolent, educational or med- 
ical; and, " as your society does not come under 
either of the above heads, we cannot under our rules 
grant you any reduction " 

Who will educate the railroads? The (}range 
t/oes come under the first three heads and perhaps 
the fourth also. Its U. s. Supreme Court and con- 
gressional medicine is hard to take. A plank in tli» 
Grange platform reads: " We shall advance the 
cause of education among ourselves and (or our 
children by all just means within our power." 

M. E. Hayes, Worthy lecturer of the State 
Grange of Oregon, has invaded the Territory of 
Idaho, and to good purpose. .Idaho is under the 
jurisdiction of the Worthy Master of the Oregon 
.State Grange. Brother Hayes has organized two 
good Granges within a month in Idaho. They are 
live, active, enthusiastic Granges, and report to the 
.Secretary of the National Grange that they " are in 
Idaho county, Idaho Territory, to stay, progress, 
build up the Order and be a voice and power in 
the National Grange ere long. " 



Write personal letters to the Congressman of your 
district and both your U. S. Senators. Prepare a 
memorial on these subjects, attach the name of the 
Master and secretary of your Grange, make three 
copies, and send one to your Congressman and one 
to each of your Senators. 

"Act, act, in the living present, 
Heart within and God o'erhead." . 



In.st.\llation' at Haywards. — Again Eden 
and Temescal Granges will have a joint instal- 
lation of officers. The meeting will open at 
ten o'clock to-day in Haywards. Ten candi- 
dates are expected to be instructed in the fourth 
degree. This is complimentary to the workers 
of Eden Grange. Bro. J. V. Webster was a 
welcome attendant at Temescal Grange last 
Saturday evening, and will doubtless take part 
in installing the Worthy Secretary of the State 
Grange, as Master of Eden Grange. Many 
other representative Granges, it is hoped, will 
be present. All P. of H. are invited, and we 
can vouch that Eden's Harvest Feast will be 
ample and good enongh for all who can attend. 



Gra.noe Items.— We note in the Patron that 
Potter Valley Grange expected to add 14 to its 
membership at its New Year's meeting . . . . .\ 
large concourse of friends attended the funeral 
of Mrs. Wm. Tibbits, an esteemed sister in 
Sacramento Grange. . . .Magnolia Grange had a 
good average attendance last year, gained 17 

members and got clear of debt The ball at 

Coloma, given for the benefit of Bro. Veerkamp, 
whose bouse was burned recently, was largely 
attended and the receipts were satisfactory. 



Installation at Yuba Citv. — The Sutler 
Farmer states that the meeting of Yuba City 
Grange, appointed for January Stii, has been 
postponed until Saturday, the I5tb. The 
(irange will be called to order at 10 a. m., for 
the purpose of conferring the first and second de- 
grees. At 1:30 I". M., the officers-elect will be 
installed by State Lecturer Flint. The instal- 
lation will be public, and all friends of the 
Order are cordially invited. 



Sacramento Grascers' Busine.ss Associa- 
tion'. — A notice in our advertising columns an- 
nounces the semi-annual meeting of this very 
popular association in Sacainento, January 
11th, at 10 o'clock A. M. It is desired that 
there be a full attendance. 



Stockton Notes. 

(Written for the Ri kal Pkius by Mr-s. \V. I». A.] 
New Year's Day came in merrily through the 
thick fog that, in lieu of rain, keeps grain grow- 
ing and pastures quite good; but the noon sun, 
warm as April, broke forth and everybody 
basked in its rays, and wished everybody a 
" Happy New Year," and rested from business 
routine and thought the outlook for citv and 
county brighter. Wheat was up to SI. 55. A 
.$•220,000 courthouse was to be started ; another 
bridge to be built across the San Joai|uin at 
Mossdale, Sutherland's ferry, costing .*20,940. 
Main street was fine with basalt pavement and 
concrete sidewalks — all of the streets in good 
order, elegant and tasteful dwellings were con- 
stantly going np. Permanence and thrift 
showed everywhere. A free postal delivery 
was likely to be got through the efforts of Con- 
gressman Lnutitt, who is also struggling hard, 
with a good show of success, to get a large 
river and harbor appropriation from Congress, 
to dredge and improve the .San Juai|uin and 
Stockton and Mormon channels. 

But as the days wear on, anxiety for rain fills 
country and town. The west side needs rain to 
put in a crop, and some black land needs it, and 
much grain that is sown will not come up 
without it. Some are plowing the grain in 
which will come right up; others feel that it is 
best to wait for the month to foretell the 
season. Dense fogs help, but after the good 
time to put in grain, rain is the one great want 
that all signs fail to supply. Now that the 
Legislature is met, people feel that it must pass 
some measure for district distribution in the 
interest of the people, of the snows hoarded in 
the watersheds of the State, that will insure a 
part of a crop, at least, to the cultivator of 
either fruits or grain. 

At Christmas, turkeys rose from 11 to 16 and 
25 cents a pound. Unfortunately most farmers 
had parted with theirs before the rise. Usual- 
ly Stockton markets yield a fair profit to poul- 
try raisers. 

Purple figs dried and put without pressing 
into a cracker box, sold at the groceries for 
four cents a pound lately. Nowhere in the 
world can figs be cured more quickly than 
in this dry, sunny valley, with no fogs till 
December. Hot lye from wood ashes kills in- 
sects, and if pa-ked next diy the figs are pliant 
and sugary. Native l>lack walnuts bear full 
each year, and sell for 10 cpnts a pound; they 
have been pronounced by Eastern visitors bet- 
ter than theirs. W. B. West b»« magnificent 
French walnuts in bearing. Won the gold 
medal at th<' late Citrus Fair, at S icramento, 
for them. He has done valuable work in devel- 
oping the capabilities of this soil and climate 
for useful fruits, nuts and berries. 



A Citrus Fair is to be held in the Horticult- 
ural hall, at San Jose, during th« second week 
of February. 



From the National Lecturer. 

Under date of Christmas, Bro. Whitehead, 
Lecturer N. G., writes a genial personal letter 
to the Master of Temescal (irange. He speaks, 
among other things, of having just returned 
from " a grand meeting of the Maine State 
Grange," and finding on his desk reports from 
several others, all showing hopeful signs. 

Toward the close he says : " I thank you 
for the invitation to visit California. I have a 
number of friends in the State, and was quite 
temnted to go on with my comrades of the (i. 
A. K. last summer. Perhaps by co operation of 
all concerned it might be arranged that I can 
visit you, say next year (I refer to 18>SS), mak- 
ing calls among the Granges of Colorado, Or- 
egon, Idaho, etc., when going or returning." 

Sister Jeanne C. Carr, Bros. Ewer and 
Dewey, and other California Patrons, have 
lively and agreeable recollections of Bro. 
Whitehead speaking at the Centenninl Encamp- 
ment in Philadelphia, when 1000 to 1500 was 
l)ut an average attendance at those pleasant 
evening meetings, and will rejoice to see his 
face and grasp his hand and hear his earnest 
voice again. Whenever he pays his visit to the 
Pacific Coast we are sure he will receive the 
warmest and heartiest of welcomes. 



Grange Elections.'* 

Bennett Valley Grange.— Dec. IS: Don 
Mills, M.; J. M. Talbot, O.; A. R. Licque, L.; 
W. P. Crane. S.; J. P. Whitaker, A. S.; Mrs. 

A. Lacque, C; N. Carr, T.; A. P. Crane, G. 
K.; J. B. Whitaker, Sec; Mrs. J. M. Talbot, 
Ceres; Miss S. A. Lacque, P.; Miss Ida B. 
Licque, F.; Miss Nellie ]?eter8on, L. A. S.; G. 
N. Whitaker, Trustee. 

Potter Valley Orange. — Dec. IS: W. A. 
Grover, M.; H. S. McGee. 0.; S. H. McCrearv, 
L.; W. S. Vaun, S.; G. D. Neil, A. S.; T. W. 
Dashiell, C; F. M. Hughes, T.; W. V. Kill- 
bourne. Sec; J. Lierlev, G. K ; Miss Emma 
Neil, P.; Miss Clara Brower, F.; Mrs. Laura 
Licrley, Ceres; Miss Addie Dashiell, L. A. S. 

St. Helena Grange. — Dec. 18: J. Norton, 
M.; H. J. Lewelling, 0.; Jane L. Peterson, L. ; 
W. Pinkham, S.; Chas. A. Storey, A. S.; W. 

B. Storey, G. K.; W. Peterson, Sr., Sec; Mrs. 
N. Hewes, C; H. Meacham, T.; Mrs. Ella 
Storey, Ceres; Mrs. Edna Norton, P.; Miss 
Maggie Fountain, F. ; Mrs. C. Castner, L. A. S. 

Sutter Mill Grange. — Di;c. II: F. J. 
VeerUamp, M.; Wm. Nichols, 0.; Wm. Valen- 
tine, L.; E. M. Smith, S.; J. SooUri, A. S.; A. 
Morelv, C; J. Crocker, T.; F. Veerkamp, 
.Sec; E. Vee<'kamp, G. K.; Geo. Ranipoy, Trus- 
tee, Sister J.Crocker, P.; Sister L. Peterson, 
F.; Sister W Stearns, Ceres; Sister A. Veer- 
kamp, L. A. S. 

^'SccretaricH, or other otlicers, are invited to i>end us 
lists of officers elected, date of inatallatioDs, and all 
Other iotere»tini,' matter for publication. 



The printed proceedings of the Twentieth Annual 
Session of the National Grange, a book of 195 
pages, are now being sent out through the different 
secretaries of State Granges; two copies for each 
subordinate Grange. The important reports of 
orticers and committees should be carefully read and 
studied in every Grange, that the plans and work of 
our Order may be well understood, and then all 
should help earnestly in the work of carrying them 
on to success. 

The Patrons of New Hampshire are arranging for 
a scries of lectures during the winter, covering all 
parts of the State. Six different lecturers will lollow 
each other in this lecture course. Massachusetts 
Patrons aro also to have a series of lecture? by the 
Lecturer of the National Grange in Kebruary. 
Brother C. L. Whitney will continue his work in 
Nebraska during January. He reports six Granges 
reorganized and ten more nearly ready to take up 
the work. Brother D. H. Thing, Past Master and 
present I-ecturer of the Maine State Grange, has ac- 
cepted the appointment as one of the four Deputy 
National Lecturers provided for at the last session of 
thi" National Grange. He will work in some nine 
different Stales, and will be busy nearly all the year. 
Pennsylvania State Grange will follow up the success- 
ful lecture work of last year. 

mini Grange, No. 772, Macon county, Illinois, 
reports 12 new members. 

North Brookfield Grange, Massachusetts, has just 
received 17 additions. 

Indiana Grange, No. 313, Pa., dedicated a fine 
new hall a few weeks ago, and has seven applications 
for membership. 

Moorestown Grange, No. 8. N. I., has just com- 
pleted a fine new Grange hall of brick, two stories ; 
number over 100 members. 

Connecticut Patrons are arranging for a Fire In- 
surance Company "for Patrons only." 

" Let us remember that the crow ning glory of our 
organization is to educate and elevate the .-American 
farmer, and bring good cheer to the family house- 
hold." W. H. Stinson, 
Master N. H. State Grange. 

Question for discussion by subordinate Granges : 
What proportion of the profit paid by producers upon 
the cost of farm products goes to the farmer, and 
how can we "save for wife and home an honest 
share of what our harvests yield?" 

Several matters are now before Congress that every 
Patron, every farmer and every Grange should take 
prompt action upon. 

1. Fiirorinf; the bill creating a Department of 
.Agriculture aiid Labor, with its head a member of 
the President's Cabinet 

2. Fa-tiorim; the Reagan interstate commerce 
bill, protecting farmers and others from unfair dis- 
crimination in charges, etc. 

3. Favoring the f-Ialch Experimental Station bill, 
appropriating $15,000 annually to each Slate to 
sustain an experiment station. 

4. Opposing all Tariff legislation being asked for 
by manuhcturers and others that will pl.ace " raw 
materials " (all farm products, wool, hides, hemp, 
flax, etc.. are " raw materials ") on the fue list, and 
leave a High Tariff on the manufactured goods that 
farmers have to buv. 

5. Opposing a\\ legislation that will cut off, hinder 
or prevent the working of the oleomargarine law. 



Jan. 8, 1887.] 



f ACIFie R.URAb PRESS. 



^^GI^ICULTURAL X^OTES. 



CALIFORNIA. 

Calaveraa. 
CoEN Yield.— Editors Press:— In reading 
the columns of your paper I noticed an article 
on corn-raising. I have been raising corn for 
several years and have never raised less than 
2500 pounds to the acre on any of my land 
planted; an average yield will reach 3000 
pounds per acre or more. Last year I planted 
eight acres of corn which yielded 5000 pounds 
per acre of shell corn, besides many loads of 
pumpkins, and without irrigation. The ground 
was plowed three times and kept clean of weeds. 
Have always raised pumpkins and squashes 
among my corn, and could never see thaC they 
were any damage to the corn. My place is situ- 
ated in Calaveras county on the Calaveras river. 
— A Subscriber, Jenny Lind. 

Inyo. 

Irrigation Project. — Independent, Jan. 1: 
In the Sierra mountains, on the west side of 
Owens valley, are many small lakes. One of 
these is near the head of Black Rock canyon, 
a few miles north of Independence. It is the 
intention of Mr. C. B. Rawson to tap this lake 
during the coming summer, and bring the water 
down into the valley for irrigation. He thinks 
a tunnel of about 300 feet in length would tap 
the lake at a depth of about 40 feet. This 
would give a large supply of water. 

Lassen. 

Stock Range. — Reno Gazette : Albert Gal- 
latin, of Sacramento, has recently purchased 
the land on the shores of Eigle lake for 20 
miles. He will use his Red Bluff ranch for a 
winter range and the Eigle Lake property for 
a summer range. He will not move his horses 
and mules. His cattle are all good grade, and 
he is using none but thoroughbred Herefords. 
Placer. 

Fruit from Dutch Flat. — Grass Valley 
Tidinijs, Dec. 31: This year the fruit ship- 
ments from Dutch Flat have been 37,780 lbs. 
by freight and about .3000 lbs. by express, mak- 
ing a total of 40,780 lbs., mostly of apples and 
pears, with some plums and peaches. Many 
of the growers there find a good home market, 
and others are holding their apples in expecta- 
tion of better prices later on. 

Grape Shipments. — Republican: At Rock- 
lin this season Hawk & Wood shipped seven 
carloads of grapes ; the California Raisin Com- 
pany, six carloads of raisins ; Lay ton Bros., 
two carloads of grapes ; Mr. Himes, two car- 
loads of grapes; and some smaller lots have 
been shipped by other persons which would 
make the total at least 3.50,000 pounds. 

Sacramento. 

Planting Oranges. — Record Union, Dec. 
31 : The orchardists of the lower Sicramento, 
whose success in raising peaches and other 
fruits made their locality famous and the ranch 
owners wealthy, have turned their attention to 
citrus fruits. George Smith, whose ranch ,is a 
portion of the old .Tared Runyon place, about 
a mile below Courtland, is atranging to plant 
200 young orange trees of choice variety on his 
mound — the highest Indian mound on the river. 
Mr. Smith has a large number of Tahiti orange 
and Sicily lemon trees on his ranch which have 
attained a hight of between two and four feet 
from the seed in one season. Peter Green, on 
Randall island, above Courtland, will plant 100 
orange trees this winter, and other fruit men 
down there express their determination to give 
citrus fruit raising a thorough trial at once. 
San Bernardino. 

Experimenting. — Ontario Record: H. J. 
Rose has lately received a case of plants from 
the Gov't Botanical Gardens, Jamaica. He in 
tends trying how the climate of California suits 
the mango, star apple, custard apple, naseberry, 
Malay apple, alligator pear, etc. Among the 
number are the following spices: Ginger, cin- 
namon, nutmeg, allspice; and flowering shrubs, 
including poinsettia, bougainvillea, ylang, etc., 
are also included. We hope the experiment 
will be a success. 

San DleKO. 

To SIake Olive Oil. — National City Record, 
Dec. 24 : Material for the new olive oil factory 
is now being put on the ground. The building 
will be 115 feet deep, two stories high, and is 
located just south of the new Land and Town 
Co.'s office. Frank A. Kimball, the owner 
states that work will be pushed as rapidly as 
possible. This will be one of the most impor 
taat enterprises in National City, making a 
permanent market for all the olives raised in 
this section. 

San Luis Obispo. 
Poultry Notes. — Paso Robles Leader: Mr, 
John Marden, one mile from Eitrella P. O 
has made a business of raising poultry for about 
three years, and from 200 hens he realized as 
much as some of the extensive grain farmers 
Mr. Dane, of Hog canyon, raised about 200 
turkeys for market this year, realizing about 
12 cents per pound net. The fowls average )2 
pounds each. 

Sonoma. 

Wheat Acreage. — Democrat, 3 1: More 
land in this county is being sown to wheat the 
present season than has been before for many 
years. Some years ago the Hessian fly became 
so destructive that farmers lately have been 
planting their land to other crops. The presen' 
season opened favorably — so early that farmers 
began sowing wheat after the first rain, and are 
now in hope that when the season arrives when 



this insect is so destructive, the wheat will be 
too large to be affected much. 

Coast Dairies. — P. D. Qainlan, a prominent 
dairyman, reports feed along the coast good, 
and the farmers in that section buoyant over 
the encouraging outlook for the coming year. 
Most of the dairy ranches on the coast are 
rented and leased to Swiss, who seem able to 
make more out of them than the owners them- 
selves. Dairy lands are being rented for the 
coming year at prices slightly in advance of 
what ttiey were last season, wnich is a pretty 
good indication of what the outlook is. Butter 
and cheese promise to be of a better quality 
than usual. Not many of the dairies, however, 
will change hands, most of them being rented 
for the coining year by the same parties who 
occupied them the present season. The dairy- 
men have recently clubbed together and pur- 
chased a schooner by which to ship their prod- 
uce to S. F. 

Planting Prospects. — Six years ago Capt. 
Grosse established an olive orchard on Rinoon 
Hights, several miles east of town. His or- 
chard now comprises many acres, and he is still 
planting. This and other experiments have 
been so satisfactory that the number is annu- 
ally increasing. We learn that upward of 50,- 
000 olive trees will be planted in Sonoma county 
the coming spring, 40,000 in Placer county, 25,- 
000 in Gilroy, 14,000 in Alameda and other 

counties adapted to their culture On the 

Fountain Grove farm, north of town, several 
trees of oranges are now in full bearing, and the 
fruit is pronounced superior. Other experi- 
ments in different parts of the county have 
been equally successful. The great drawback 
at present is the cost of trees, choice varieties 
bringing from .$2 to $3 each. Most people are 
deferring the planting of oranges in considera- 
ble numbers until prices are lower, which will 

probably be several years The demand for 

peach trees is slightly in advance of what it 
was last year. While they do not thrive well 
except upon a sandy soil, there are large tracts 
of land in the county which possess all requi- 
sites for their growth. The lack of a market 
has, for several years, prevented many from 
planting; but with the assurance of our new 
railroad this industry has received a new im- 
petus. 

Santa Cruz. 

Persimmon.s. — Pajaronian, Dec. .30: Hang- 
ing in W. V. Gaffey's office are several bunches 
of fine persimmons. A tew years ago he bought 
a lot of persimmon trees from .lames Waters 
and set them out on his mountain ranch. 
They have been in bearing two or three sea- 
sons, and each year have shown a good yield. 

Tulare. 

A Simple Drier. — Hanford Sentinel: Geo. 
Thyark's new raisin-drier is proving a success. 
It consists simply of a board building 16x24 
feet in one room, with a ceiling about 12 feet 
high, in which are two ventilators. In the cen- 
ter is a trench three feet deep. In this is a 
large box-stove, attached to which is a sheet- 
iron drum about 10 feet long. Racks are built 
with grooves to receive the regular trays upon 
which the grapes are brought from the vines, 
with only space enough to admit of free circula- 
tion of the air, which, with the stove, is at a 
necessary temperature to do the work of drying 
the fruit, which is kept from 90 to 100 degrees. 
We visited it on Monday and found it full of 
choice fruit, the last of his crop, which was all 
cleaned up and placed inside on Saturday, just 
before the rain. The drier is simple and work- 
ing satisfactorily. 

Fine Herefords. — Timet: Jasper Harrell 
and W. H. Hammond this week purchased of 
C. B. Smith, of Fayette, Missouri, two thor- 
oughbred Hereford bulls, which were delivered 
in Visalia Monday morning, and were an at- 
traction for many stockmen all day. Mr. 
Hammond's bull is four years old and weighs 
1900 pounds; Mr. Harrell's is three years old 
on the 23d of this month and weighs 1600 
pounds. Neither of the animals is what would 
bs called fat, but both are in good condition. 
They are fine animals and are meat all over, 
from head to tail and down to the hoof. Mr. 
Harrell is the possessor of two full-blooded 
Hereford cows and three young bulls, and with 
the present addition to his stock has a good 
starter in the business. Mr. Smith values the 
mother of the Harrell bull at $1200, and says 
she could be sold for that at any time. Proba 
bly before the week is out two or three more of 
those bulls will be sold to parties living in 
Visalia. Messrs. Harrell and Hammond paid 
$400 each for their animals, which is considered 
dirt cheap. 

Market Gardening. — RecjiUer, Dec. 31 
Eist Tulare is to have a market garden that is 
not the property of Chinamen. While north 
recently, Mr. T. Bacigalupi induced three 
Italian gardeners of Stockton to embark in busi- 
ness in 'rulare. They purchased 20 acres from 
Mr. A. Y. Moore, and are erecting buildings 
and preparing the ground for the coming sea- 
son. They understand their business thor- 
oughly. 

Ventura. 

Livestock. — Free Press, Dec. 31: Stock- 
raising in this county, under Mexican rule, 
consisted solely of cattle and horses; but when 
the Americans took possession they made sheep- 
raising a specialty. Under their supervision, 
the county has supported as many as a quarter 
million head at one time, and at the present 
there are somethins; like 75,000 head in the 
county. 



ment roll indicating 3000 American horses, 
over 2.300 of which are graded. Percheron, 
Belgian, Hambletonian, Morgan and other 
breeds have been imported. Among cattle 
there have been imported Durhams, Jerseys 
and Holsteins. The county is in advance of 
many others in the best breeds of horaes and 
cattle, farmers having reached the conclusion 
that good stock can be raised as easily as the 
poorer varieties and to much greater profit. 
The industry has recently received a fresh im- 
petus in this section. The raising of hogs is 
also engaged in extensively and profitably. 
Diseases among stock are unknown here, ex- 
cept scab in sheep, which has not proved de- 
structive. Poultry-raising has also proved 
profitable. 

Yolo. 

Grapes and Raisins. — Democrat: From 140 
acres of the Briggs vineyard, 21,500 boxes of 
raisins have been packed and 175 tons of grape 
converted into wine. Estimating the raisins at 
.$1.50 per box and the wine grapes at .flO per 
ton, there is a gross product of $.34,000, or an 
average of $243 per acre. We are unable to es- 
timate the entire cost of placing this crop on the 
market, but the profits are large and speak well 
for the production of Yolo county. Including 
the foregoing, Mrs. G. G. Briggs and family 
have a raisin crop in Yolo this year of 58,000 
boxes. Such a return from vineyard lauds is 
sufficient to impress the homo seeker favorably. 
These figures are reliable and can be verified 
without trouble. 

NEVADA. 

Beef.— R?no Gazette, Dec. 28: The beef 
market is in a very unsatisfactory condition 
Everything points to a glut during February. 
The haystacks are fast disappearing, and at 
least half the stock now on the meadows must 
either go to the shambles or hunt new feeding 
ground very soon. This state of things butchers 
are taking advantage of. The fact is, shippers 
do not want cattle except at low figures — five 
cents is the top price at Reno for a good grade 
of steers, and they must be cut in the middle 
at that. Cattlemen are somewhat discouraged. 
Taking the brightest view of the situation, a 
large tail end of the cattle left here after the 
middle of February must go to the hooks at 
very low rates. An estimate of the beef cattle 
now in Nevada, made for Mr. Ricky by J. F. 
Triplett, shows that there are about 20 000 
head east of the mountains. There are 9500 
head on the meadows; Honey lake, 2500; Sierra 
valley, 800; Lovelock, about 2000. Outside of 
these are not over 1200 head of cattle on the 
Humboldt. Bradley and Russell had .500 head 
up, but turned them out rather than sell at 
present prices. They are shipping up 100 tons 
of hay from Livermore to feed at Battle Mount- 
ain. They get very low rates. 



preme Court. 

Railroad 
Commi-eioiiers. 

Board of 
Equalization. 



DiST. — Namk. 



Assembling of the Legislature. 

The new State officers have assumed their 
trusts excepting the new Governor, having been 
inaugurated on Thursday. 

The Assembly organized promptly by the 
election of Hon. W. H. Jordan, of Alameda, as 
speaker. The Senate organized on Wednesday 
afternoon by choosing Stephen M. White, of 
Los Angeles, president pro tern., and E. H. 
Hamilton, of Alameda, secretary. The Assem- 
bly began business on Wednesday afternoon. 
The first bill was introduced by Mr. McDonald, 
it being an amendment to Section 1, Article 
XIll of the Constitution, exempting growing 
vines and fruit trees from taxation. 

We give on this page the full list of State 
officers now in charge, and of the members of 
both houses, with the districts they represent and 
their residences. These lists should be kept for 
reference. 

Major Robert Beck. — The friends of Major 
Robert Beck, lormerly Secretary of the State 
Agricultural Society, and more recently Secre- 
tary of the California Jersey Cattle Club, will be 
pained to hear of his death. He has been a 
sufferer of late by rheumatism and neuralgia, 
and it was seen by his friends that he was tail- 
ing fast. He was missed Dec. 23d, and on the 
morning of .Ian. 4th his body was found in the 
bay. Whether he fell in by accident or sought 
death in a fit of mental aberration is not known. 
He was by birth a Pennsylvanian, and came to 
California in 1849. 



Poisoning Rabbits. — F. H. Roberts, of 
l/ookout, has been telling the Adin Argus how 
to kill off rabbits. His plan is to build a plat- 
form of narrow boards about 18 inches from the 
ground, at a place that stock cannot reach. On 
top of this platform scatter pulverized salt and 
arsenic, or any similar poison. During the wet 
season the poisonous water runs through to the 
ground and thus makes a " lick " for these 
animals, which they will soon find and frequent. 
This is said to be one of the best modes of 
poisoning them, and we would like to see it 
fairly tried. ^ 

Raising Mules. — The Petaluma Courier 
thinks it next in order for some enterprising 
lover of good stock to import a few choice 
Maltese or Spanish jacks, and go into the busi- 
ness of raising mules. These jacks are said to 
be the largest and finest in the world, and, 

„„ I crossed with our big American mares, might 

Recently imported draft and other breed an animal that would at three years old 
horses have been introduced, the last assess. ' sell readily for at least $250 to $.300. 



The New State Governmeu 

State Officers. 

Governor Wasiihjgtgn BiRTLF.TT 

Lieutenant-Governor k. W. Watkkman 

Secretary of State Wm. C. Hendricks 

Controller ,1ohn P. Dunn 

Treasurer aua.i Hkkold 

Attorney-Genetal Georoe A. JotuisoN 

Superintendent of Puolic Instruction Ira G. JHorrr 

Surveyor-General Theodore Keichbrt 

Cierk of Supreme Court J. D. Spencer 

Associate Jus- I short term Jacrson Temple 

tices of Su- - lonjf term T. B. McFarland 

( long term A. Van R. Patterhon 

( Ist district A. Abbott 

■ 2d district P. J. WiiiTK 

(3d district .)as. W. Rea 

/ 1st district Gordon E. Sloss 

) 2il district L. C. Moheuouse 

1 .'id district C. E. WiLCoxoN 

( 4i,h district John T. Gafeet 

Senators. 

County and Post Office. 

1- John P Haynes, 7).. . .Humboldt, Del Norte. .Eureka 

2- J M Brioeland D Trinity, Siski'u, Shasta, Shasta 

3- \V H Patterson, Ji Modoc, Lassen, Plumas, Sierra 

Cedarville 

4- Aibert F .Tones, D Butte Oroville 

."i-A Walrath, Jt Nevada Nevada City 

ti-A Yell, D Mendocino, Lake Ukiah 

7- A P Hall, /{ Placer, El Dorado.... ..Peniyn 

8- Jobn Boggs, D Colusa, Tehama Princeton 

9- H CGesford, I) Yolo, Napa Napa City 

lu-EC Hinshaw, ]) Sonoma Petaluma 

11- James McCudden, D. .Solano Vallejo 

12- A L Chandler, J{. .. .'Yuba, Sutter Nicolaus 

13- F R Diay, J{ Sacramento Sacramento 

14- A Camuiecti, J) Amador, Calaveras Jackson 

15- J P Abbott, R Marin, Contra Costa .. Martinez 

Ki-F J Molfitt. i» Alameda Oakland 

17- Henry Vrooman, Jl. . .Alameda Oakland 

18- M W Dixon, 1) Alameda Mission San Jose 

19- John Lenahan, /). . . .San Francisco 151 Tehama 

20- Thomas J Piniier, />..Saa Francisco. . .321 Broadway 

21- J J Sullivan, Z> San Francisco.. . .D36 Shotwell 

22- J N E Wilson, R »an Francisco Old City Hall 

23- P J Crinimins, /{ San Francisco 45 Ritch 

24- P J Murphy, D San Francisco 29 Russ 

25- D J McCirthy, D San Francisco 1128 Folsom 

2G-T H McDonald, D San Francisco.. State P's Office 

27-T J Clunie, /> San Francisco 8.16 Turk 

2S-L Spellacy, D San Francisco .. 2529 Bryant Av 

21)-B F Lang(ord, D San Joaquin Lodi 

30- A J Meaney, JJ Merced, Stanislaus, Tuolumne 

Merced 

31- *. W Crandall, R Santa Clara San Jose 

32- E B Couklin, R Santa Clara San Jose 

33- J D Byrnes, R San Mat'o, S'ntaCruz,S. Mateo 

34- G G Gouoher, Z) Alpine, Mariposa, Mono, Fres'o 

Mariposa 

3j-B V Sar^fent, D Monterey, S. Benito, Monterey 

3H-John Koth, J) Tulare, Kern Traver 

37- George Stjele, R S L Otispo, S Barbara, Ventura 

San Luis Obispo 

38- S M White, 1) Los Angeles Los Angeles 

39- L J Rose, J) Los Angeles San Gabriel 

40- w W Bowers, R S Bernardino, S Diego, S Diego 

Total Democratic Senators 26 

Total Republican Senators 14 

Majority Democratic, 12. 

Assemblymen. 

Di.ST.— Name. Countt and Post Office. 

1- R H Campbell, R Del Norte, Siskiyou 

2- George Williamo, ij.. Humboldt Ferndale 

3- J F McGowan, R Humboldt Eureka 

4- I' W H Shanalian, J). .Trinity, Shasta Anderson 

6- W D Morris, JJ Modoc, Lassen Lookout 

C-R H F Variel, Jt Plumas, Sierra <iuincy 

7- W P Matthews, I) Tehama Tehama 

8- Allen Henry, D Butte Chico 

9- L C Granger, J) Butte Oroville 

10- T J Hart, D Colusa Colusa 

11- Philo Handy, R Mendocino Covelu 

12- L H Gruwell, ]> Lake Lower Lake 

13- George Ohleyer, D. . .Sutler, Yuba Yuba City 

14- Jo&iah Sims, R Nevada Nevada City 

15- John I Sykes, R Nevada Grrilss Valley 

16- John Davis, R Placer Rocklin 

Ir-Henry Mahler, D El Doraio Coloma 

18- H W Carroll, R Sacramento Sacramento 

19- L S Taylor, R Sacramento Sacramento 

20- Seymour Carr, R Sacramento Clay Station 

21- L B Adams, I) Yolo Knight's Landing 

22- F L Coombs, R Najja Napa City 

23- QWMo gan, D Sonoma Fort Ross 

24- W J Hotchkiss J) Sonomu Windsor 

25- J McDonnell Jr, R. ..Sonoma Sonoma 

2G-Frank O'Grady, l> Solano Vallejo 

27- Robert J Carrey. II. . .Solano Dixon 

28- J W Athcrton, /( Marin Novato 

29- James B Brown, R. . .San Francisco. . .14 Willows Av 

30- Jos Burnett, R San Francisco 144 Second St 

31- Edwin Lewis, I) San Francisco 54G Mission 

32- A M Lawrence, D San Francisco 608 Powell 

33^ J Callaghan, I) San Francisco 921 Natoma 

34- Michael H Barry, /f..San Francisco 8 Glover 

,S.5-J H Colbert. D S.n Francisco 450 Third 

.3G-C F Curry, H Xan Francisco. .334 Clementina 

37-Thomas M Seary. />. .San Francisco, 436^ Clementina 

35- l)aniel S Rc<an'. J>. . .San Francisco ...546 Stevenson 

39- James E Biitt, V San F.. .No. 3 H & L Fire Dept 

40- Andrew J Martin. /f..San Francisco 1414 Folsom 

41- Heury R Mann, D ... San Francisco, 3004 Sacramento 

42- John LaBIanc, Jt San Francisco. . 1721 Devisadero 

43- Luther L Ewing, Jt. . .San Francisco 1601 Turk 

44- Kichard Cohen, /' . .San Francisco 103 Ridley 

4.5-\Viliiani A Brown, /?..San Francisco 2306 Mission 

46- Hugh Toner, J) San Francisco 608 Third 

47- Thoiiias Mitchell. .San Francisco, Cor Utah & Yolo 

48- Joseph Winrow, i( San Francisco, Recorder's office 

4!)-W Z Price, R San Mateo San Mateo 

,50-Jesse Cope, J) Santa Cruz Santa Cruz 

51- Hiram Bailey, R Alameda Livermore 

52- John Ellsworth, it... Alameda Alameda 

53- M i>Hydc, R Alameda Oakland 

64- F M cdolcv, R Alameda Oakland 

65- W H lordaii, Jt Alameda Oakland 

5G-U O Alexander, It Alameda OakUiid 

57-D N Sherburne, R Contra Costa Danville 

5S-J D Young, /) San Joaquin Stockton 

59-J R Henry, D San Joaquin Linden 

liO-J C Brusic, R Amador lone 

61- F W McCUnahan, Calaveras Milton 

62- Edwaid Smythe, D. ..Tuolumne Soiiora 

63- 1 A Wilcox, Jl SantaClara Santa Clara 

(14-U M Weber, Jl Santa Clara San Jose 

(15-Samupl Rucker, J) Santa i;lara San Joso 

«(;-C V Wright, JJ Stanislaus Modesto 

67-.I W But>t, /) Merced, M.ariposa Merced 

05- J II Matthews, D San Benito HoUister 

69- Tlionias Runson, /).. .Monterey Gonzales 

70- J P Vincent, II Fresno Fresno City 

71- A B Butler, Jl Tulare Grangevillo 

72- A J Gould, yi Alpine, Mono, Invo.. ..Darwin 

7.i-McD R Venable, ». ...San Luis Obispo. .San L Obispo 

74- Ru.s»ell Heath, J) Santa Barbara Carpenteria 

75- J Marion Brooks, 7.). . Kern, Ventura, S Buenaventura 

76- J R Brierly, if I.os Angeles Los Angeles 

7r-G VV Knox, R Los Angeles Los Angeles 

78- «' II Spurgcon, D . Los Angeles Santa Ana 

79- IIiramM Barton, i>. .San Bernardino. . .S Cernardino 

80- Nestor A Young, if. . .San Diego Mesa Grande 

Total Republican Assemblymen 41 

Total Democratic Assemblymen 39 

Majority Republican, 2. 

Democratic majority on joint ballot 10 



26 



f ACIFie I^URAlo f RESS. 



[Jan. 8, 1887 




The Cottage in the Orchard. 

(Written for the Kiral Press by Nkstmnii.) 

In the heart of a peach orchard, 
Laden with most luscious fruit, 
Overgrown with but two vines, 
Honeysuckle, bond of love. 
And the reddest of red roses, 
Stands a brown and low-roofc-d cottage. 
Home of six most happy children. 

I.ike a nest within the peach trees, 
Like the birdies in the brown nests, 
Safely sheltered from all care. 
This vine-covered, low-roofed cottage, 
Brown with age of many years; 
Sheltered these six happy children. 
Bound with ties affections weave. 

Ere the children yet had fontured 
On the wide world's restless tide. 
Tried how strong might be their pinions, 
Came a messenger from heaven. 
Took the father by the hand. 
Whispered, " Follow me, my loved one, 
lie who sent will guide your band." 

Then the band within that cottage 

Tasted Grief's most bitter cuj), 

'l asted, thinking, " We will trust Him, 

He will not forsake His own." 

In the chain affection-woven. 

Now one link is sadly broken. 

Never to be lorged again. 

As the vines upon that cottage 
Honeysuckle, bond of love, 
koses, but where'er the roses. 
There so surely is the thorn. 
Of the two that left that brown nest, 
For the one Love strews her roses. 
For the other Grief spreads thorns. 

Be what may their path of duty. 
Bound by links affection's forged, 
To that cottage in the orchard. 
Nest of love and peace and joy. 
And the Angel hovering o'er it 
Sweetly whispers, " Peace, complain not. 
Loved ones ; follow me, I'll guide you Home.' 
Craw's Landins;, Cal. 



The Senator's Daughter. 

[Written for the RcR.tL Prkss by Sarah Campbulu 

STANTORJ),) 

Perhaps my memory runs back further than 
moat children's, for I certainly can remember 
when mamma was shut up in a chamber with 
my sick baby brother for weeks, while I was 
left to the tender mercies of Katie, only getting 
a kiss occasionally as mamma would meet me 
in the hall or some of the rooms as she passed 
through. I could not have been four years old 
when I overheard Katie say to the cook : 
"What a pity 'taint this one. Little fright! 
She could very well be spared, but the bonny 
boy, with his great black eyes ! Ah, no ! 
everything goes wrong in this worhl !" 

I held a grudge against Katie; she had taught 
me to say I was Katie's little nuisance iu the 
catalogue of pet names attached to me. When 
I repeated the list to some friends diriing at our 
house, beginning with " Mamma's joy and 
papa's girl," they all laughed — papa the loudest 
— at " Katie's little nuisance." I knew Katie 
had betrayed me, and ever after I was on the 
watch for her long words, and " fright" was laid 
up against her. 

After Alvar had recovered from the long, 
dangerous illness, and we were taken out to- 
gether, it was often said of us: " What a con- 
trast ! What a pity Madge isn't the boy ! Al- 
var would make a lovely little girl; " or, " That 
girl is a perfect image of her father; she ought 
to have been the boy." So I was made dissatis- 
fied and jealous at a very early age. .Tealous — 
just thiuk of it — of the large, dark eyes, the 
silky, black hair, the refinea, delicate beauty, 
80 like our mother. Alvar was frail and deli- 
cate, while I was robust, as all children 
should be. 

Our home was in a pretty inland town on 
what is known as the "Western Reserve," 
Ohio. Our father, the first lawyer of the place 
— brilliant, jovial and eloquent. Our mother, 
a sweet woman, with a clinging nature just 
fitted to adore her strong, joyous husband. I 
think, as I remember her then, she was the 
most beautiful woman I ever saw; but very 
soon trouble came upon her, and care and 
anxiety robbed her of much of her loveliness. 
As I grew older I knew that money was 
becoming scarce in our household. I 
knew, or might have known, if I hadn't 
been willfully blind, that mother was 
killing herself with the household drudgery. 
I knew, as articles of furniture wore out, 
they were not replaced by new ones, but make- 
shifts instead were resorted to. There were no 
more dinner parties nor lawn fetes at our house. 
Mother made her dresses over for me, and she 
'♦e' d at home with no one to comfort her save 
dear Alvar, who can never feel the remorse 



I now feel. He did what he could; he saw and 
sympathized with her in her heart-sorrow, 
while I was careless of everything save my own 
amusement and pleasure. 

I remember an old aunt of mother's — Aunt 
Statira — who used to visit us occasionally. She 
said one day to mother: " That girl's strong 
will will either make or ruin her. You will 
see, Margaret, she will either be a very good 
woman or a very bad one, and I fear 'twill be 
the latter." 

W^hat a temper I had ! I can remember of 
biting the pillow with rage when banished to 
my room as a punishment. The first thing that 
seemed to have any effect upon my outbursts of 
temper was a story mother told me. She said : 
" Once a certain gentleman told his little son 
he would give him a piece of smooth board, and 
he wished, every time the boy lost his eelf- 
control, he would drive a tack into that smooth 
surface ; and every time he was tempted to fly 
into a rage and restrained himself he could 
draw one out. At the expiration of a month 
the board was to be taken to the father for in- 
spection. Well, the compact was made, the 
tacks accumulated rapidly at first; but at the 
end of the second week the boy had so gained 
the mastery of himself that when the month 
was up every tack was out. He was delighted 
and ran to his father for his approbation. ' Yes, 
my son,' said he; ' the tacks are gone, which 
is a great thing gained, but the marks are there 
where they have been; and so it is with your 
anger — it has left scars on your character that 
time alone can wipe out, and perhaps you can 
never entirely efface them.' " 

That little story helped me a great deal. 
From that time I truly believe I tried to be a 
better girl. 

But father still remained out late nights, and 
in his frequent attacks of sick headaches poor 
mother hung over him like a pitying angel. 
Still I was ignorant of the sword hanging 
over our household, threatening to cut the 
bonds of affection and duty asunder. But my 
eyes were opened in a cruel manner. 

One afternoon, alter school, I went home 
with Jessie Stanhope, to practice our duet. 
How well I remember that evening, the last of 
my innocent careless happiness ! The Stan- 
hopes were the first people in town. Every- 
thing was real, from their solid silver to their 
elegant manners. So far as I could ever see, 
there wasn't a sham about them. Jessie, the 
youngest of a large family, was the pet an<l 
darling of the house — every desire was grati- 
fied; but with it all, she was the dearest, sweet- 
est child in the world. She was some months 
younger than I; but of all my friends I loved 
her best. After practicing until we were tired, 
she took me to a room in the garret, which had 
been fitted up as a studio for her brother-in- 
law, an artist of some renown, who, with his 
family, was making a long visit to this hos- 
pitable mansion, and who was at work on a 
model iu clay on that particular day. After a 
low rap, she ushered me into the " den," as it 
was called. I stood face to face with the deb- 
onair gentleman. A black velvet cap sat 
jauntily on the blond, flowing hair. He was 
my ideal of an artist. 

"I have brought you a model for the hand 
and arm you were wishing for last evening. 
Sherry," said Jessie, at the same time raising 
my arm and pushing back the loose sleeve. 

Before I could reali/.e it, 1 found myself, with 
my sleeve rolled up, passing before this ele- 
gant stranger. My one point of beauty, my 
only inheritance from my beautiful mother, was 
made much of, and for the first time in my life 
I was lifted up in pride of self. Jfsaie and he 
ran on, in a merry conversation, until the dress- 
ing-bell sounded, just as a dash of rain on the 
windov,'-pane, ana a long, low ramble of thun- 
der proclaimed the coming of a storm. 1 sprang 
to my feet to hasten home; but they remon- 
strated and persuaded me to spend the night. 
Jessie proposed that we dress in costume for 
private theatricals for the evening's amusement. 

After dispatching a servant to acquaint 
mother with the plan, we ran to Jessie's dress- 
ing-room, and I was put under the deft fingers 
of her maid, who brushed and braided my 
rough mane into something like smoothness; 
while Jessie brought in piles of old-fashioned 
party dresses that her mother and sisters had 
discarded, and which were kept for charades, 
masques, etc. She selected for me a creamy 
white crape, cut with a train. Jessie fastened 
a necklace of amethyst about my throat, with 
bracelets to match. She chose a pink satin 
with white lace and pearl ornaments. Her 
golden hair hung in curls below her waist, and 
her large, dark eyes shone like stars in the an- 
ticipation of the evening's enjoyment. 

When we appeared in the parlor, but five 
minutes before the dinner-bell rang, I was in- 
troduced to the married daughter; the other 
members of the family I knew. The massive 
silver, the waiters at our backs, and the re- 
moval of the cloth for dessert, all rendered me 
a trifle nervous; but the simple, <|uiet manners 
of this delightful family set me at my ease to 
such an extent that I neither upset my plate 
nor drank out of the finger-bowls. J >4ar mo- 
ther, with all her burdens, had carefully trained 
us in table etiquette, and I was able to endure 
the ordeal. 

After a number of tableaux and scenes, Jessie 
importuned her father to teach us the old-fash- 
ioned dance, the minuet. After he and Mr. 
Wellington (the artist) had donned the conti- 
nental costume, we were initiated into that de- 
lightful, stately dance. (Why has it been dis- 
carded ? I am sure every one would look with 
favor upon that dignified, courteous amuse- 



ment, in such contrast to the whirling, giddy 
waltz, which mother said is justly called the 
" dance of death.") 

I rose early the next morning to run home 
and study my algebra lesson, as was my cus- 
tom. I stole out of the house, down the de- 
serted streets. As I was passing a gambling 
and drinking saloon, my own father came down 
the steps with a bewildered, vacant look on his 
face, and reeled and tottered from one side of 
the pavement to the other. I hurried home a 
back way, and burst in upon mother, who was 
in the kitchen. " Mother, father is coming 
home drunk," and then I cried, and moaned, 
and wrung my hands, and wished all the dread- 
ful things that young girls are apt to wish 
when trouble first approaches them. 

Poor mother had two sick ones on her list 
that day, and she waited upon and petted us 
all the long hours, when she should have been 
in bed herself. From that time her strength 
seemed to fail her. 

I could not bear to meet father for days — 
that noble man, whom I had thought almost per- 
fection, reeling in the streets ! I felt I never 
could hold np my head again. 

Soon after, before the shock had lost its 
dreadfulness, the women began that wonderful 
movement called the " crusade. " They held 
prayer -meetings nearly all the time ; they even 
went to the saloons and prayed God to strike 
conviction to the hearts of these men, and in- 
duce them to give up their dreadful business. 

One day, as Hattie Hill and I were going 
home from school, we passed a church where 
some ladies were holding a meeting. She pro- 
posed that we go in, " just for fun," and in we 
went. The hymns or prayers, my own state of 
mind, or something, urged me on, until I was 
on my feet talking to that large assemblage of 
ladies. I was in such a state of excitement, I 
can remember nothing that was said or done 
until it was over, and mother had her arms 
about me, with my head on her shoulder, while 
she soothed me just as she did when I was a 
little girl. Other friends gathered around, and 
I heard Mrs. Smith say : " Dear child, she has 
her father's talent, sure enough." 

" Yes,'' said Mrs. Pryne, " her eyes looked 
just as his did the day he addressed the jury 
on the Jack W^inters trial." 

And 1 buried my flushed and tear-stained face 
deeper in mother's neck, and sniffed and snuffed 
myself into comparative quiet. 

That night, after I had gone to my room, 
mother came in, and told me how proud she 
was of me, and asked me if I was willing to 
consecrate any and all talents I might possess 
to the cause that was uppermost in our minds. 

"Dear Madge," she said, "I cannot stay 
long with you, and I leave a heavy burden for 
you to bear — I believe you can save your 
father yet; and there is Alvar ^ — he hats his col- 
lege life before him. Will the time ever come 
when a woman can feel safe with her loved 
ones out of her sight? Society helps me to 
shield you, my daughter; but there is nothing 
but temptation for a boy, and the higher he 
stands the surer the fall." 

" But, mother, don't you think (iod will stop 
this sin, now all these good ladies are asking 
Him to?" 

" Many of these good women have been 
praying for long years in secret before they 
dared to take this public step. Dear child, re- 
member that (iod's attitude is right toward 
this ini(|uity as it is toward all sin; it is our 
minds that need changing, and perhaps this up- 
rising of the women of this State is God's 
answer to my own and the prayers of many 
others for long years. " 

" But don't you think, mother, the saloons 
are going to be closed ? We read every day of 
some in different places closing. Won't they 
here, too ? " 

" Very few, if any, will remain closed, but I 
do thiuk perhaps a clearer vision is given me 
now the veil is so nearly lifted. I seem to see 
something grow out of this movement that will 
accomplish the blessed work; and you, my 
child, will live in this grand time. You have 
felt the divine enthusiasm to-day; you, I be- 
lieve, have a great work to do. Oh, yea; the 
women who have felt this pentecostal fire can 
never, never be content with the frivolities of 
life again. The signet of their Father's power 
is resting on their brows, and they will iu their 
woman's faith and enthusiasm by the grace of 
God do this work." 

I gave her my pledge that I would do every- 
thing in my power to stay this evil. Within a 
month after I graduated from the High School, 
and in the midst of my preparing for Vaaaar, 
my mother died. Alvar had gone up the lakes 
on an excuraion. Oh, how ahe yearned for him ! 
And the laat worda she uttered were, " Alvar ! 
Alvar ! Alvar !" as if her soul could not take its 
flight and leave him in this cruel, sinful world. 

Father was terribly shaken at her death, and 
I resolved to pit myaelf against the saloons. 
Ah ! perhaps if I had not been so ignorant of 
the strong desire of habit I would not have had 
the courage. Oh I my trials, they make me sigh 
yet. I knew nothing of housekeeping, and my 
ignorance seemed a target for the servant, who 
came and went in an unending procssion. 
Then all the every-day duties — the marketing, 
the washing and mending — how tired and dis- 
couraged I often got ! liut strength was 
always given me to keep a smiling front to 
father, whom I daily accompanied to the office. 
Alvar came home and continued his prepar- 
ation for college. Father did so well that 
I thought the conquest would be easy; but one 
evening I noticed an uneasiness in his manner 
at the tea-table, and I caught the whiff of wine 



on his breath as he walked with me into the 
parlor. Then I knew that my powers would 
be taxed to the utmost. I played and sang, 
read, talked and laughed as I never did before. 
At last 1 proposed a game of chess. Oh, how 
tedious the hours seemed as we hung over that 
chessboard, for I believe the average woman 
was never intended to play chess \ But I per- 
severed and to-day am a fair player. 

When, at last, bedtime came, and we separat- 
ed for the night, I saw in his eyes that he in- 
tended to steal out, after the house was quiet. 

I went to my room, put on a warm wrapper, 
took two blankets, and lay down on the mat at 
my father's chamber door. The last waking 
thought was, perhaps Aunt Statira would 
think my strong will was good for something, 
after all. 

I meant to keep awake, but I was a healthy 
girl, accustomed to sound sleep, and the first I 
knew somebody had stumbled over me in the 
dark. 1 immediately knew what it was, sprang 
to my fee*-, grasped father by the shoulders and 
pushed him back into his room. He was start- 
led, of course, and before he recovered himself 
I had the door locked and the key in my 
pocket. For the first time in my life I rejoic- 
ed that I was large and strong. 

I can hardly speak of the horrible night that 
followed. It was not my father who raged and 
stamped; he had the fumes of one glass of wine 
in his brain, and it made him a demon. He 
caught me and attempted to obtain possession 
of the key; but I took it from my pocket and 
threw it through the glass window into the 
garden below. 

[TO B« COSTI.\UBD. 1 

"I am the Resurrection and the Life." 

Ill Memoriam. IM. F. R ) 
[Written for the Ri'kal Prsss l>y t'lus. P. NsTrbSTOx.! 

(irief-smitlen soul, love calls to thee 
Through all thy strife — 
' ' I am the resurrection 
And the life. " 

His word proclaims these humble frames 

Turn into dust ; 
Trust and know this — to endless bliss 

God bears souls just. 

May man then mourn those death has shorn 

Of earth's keen psin ? 
Loved ones may go. but. weeper, know 

I'ure bliis Ihey gain. 

Thou wouldst not bring again earth's sting 

To the beloved ; 
Let then grief cease at (iod's relea.se — 

His love He proved. 



What a Cigar Stump Can Do. 

Kdttoks Pkes.>< : — I have been wondering of 
late if it is, after all, good to live in single- 
blessednees, and I conclude once more that it is. 
For the novelty of having somebody in my 
house with me, I rented my spare room to a 
couple of young men a week ago. All went 
well with us until yesterday, when I solved a 
mystery that had puzzled me since the day of 
their arrival. A musty and most disgusting 
smell clung to their room. I kept both their 
windows open night and day, without either 
notice or protest on their part. I feared they 
would leave me, but they didn't even com- 
plain. I felt truly grateful to them for toler- 
ating so much with such unswerving patience. 
Surely mine were model roomers. As for their 
cleanliness, their general appearance and four 
dirty towels daily on their towel-rack bore evi- 
dence to that. 

One of them cornea and goes with an occa- 
sional bow or how-d'ye-do to me. The other 
is a trifle less shy; and, though their professions 
are of an humble kind, I hear him regularly at 
9 A. M. brushing up, preparatory to bidding me 
a polite good-morning as he pusses through my 
sitting-room in a Prince Albert coat and look- 
ing as neat as a pin. Could any one dare sus- 
pect them of anything foul ? 

Yesterday I could bear it no longer. An 
army of a dozen skunks, I knew, would have 
beaten a hasty retreat from the room; nothing 
could counterbalance such an odor. It followed 
me and pervaded my own quarter, threatening 
me with eviction. My lady friend called for a 
few days' visit. I was filled with a mingled 
feeling of pleasure and pain at her coming. I 
was suffering for want of sympathy, yet dared 
not auk it under such condemning circum- 
stances. My friend kissed me at the door, en- 
tered, laid off her hat, sat down, and was about 
to enter upon a rehearsal of some amusing acci- 
dent encountered on the way, when she 
changed countenance and looked around the 
walls suspiciously, then with a plea of feeling 
faint, stepped to the door for air. I could keep 
my secret no longer. I unbosomed myself at 
once. She was, as ever, sympathetic. Who 
but would sympathize with one under such cir- 
cumstances? " It is too bad,"s'ie said, follow- 
ing me to the dreailed apartment, "that the 
sun never gets in this room." I assured her 
the sun had nothing to do with the trouble, as 
the room had been free of it the past 14 years, 
yet it had never smelled unpleasantly before. 
Then she cautiously suggesti'd rats — dead rata 
in the walls. The mystery was solved. At 
least we thought it waa, until in our investiga- 
tion we knocked a couple of cigar stumps from 



Jan. 8, 1887.] 



fACIFie f^URAb PRESS. 



the casing behind the window curtain. We 
each picked up one and smelled it. That set- 
tled it. If my roomers had entered just then 
they would have learned that cramming can be 
done outside of schools. We should have 
crammed our " find " down their throats, even 
at a peril to their immaculate shirt bosoms. 
Were they forewarned? They didn't return 
until 1 o'clock this morning. We heard them 
pass through to their room, but they were then 
safe. We had eaten nicotine in our supper; we 
were breathing it from our sheets. Indeed, we 
were too much stupefied by the ubiquitous poi- 
son to arise and execute our sentence. 

Santa Barbara, Cal. Dagmar Mariager. 



Blank Votes, 

A Great Practical Lesson. 

Three years ago a convention of delegates met 
in one of our large cities to nominate a candi- 
date for mayor. Other considerations than the 
ordinary political ones were involved. One 
man who was pushed for the office represented 
the corrupt ring of the city, the bosses who 
lived in luxury on the taxes levied on the mass 
of hard-working citizens. The other was the 
candidate of the honest, reputable part of the 
community, who hoped through him to correct 
the abuses from which it suffered. 

The excitement was intense during the meet- 
ing. When the time arrived to poll the votes, 
every man knew that he was called on to 
choose not only between a rogue and an honest 
man, but between a system of roguery and a 
system of honesty. The rings, too, were pow- 
erful, and could seriously injure the business of 
any one who opposed them. 

AVlien the ballots were counted, the two 
candidates were found to have an equal num- 
ber of votes, and one bailot, which might have 
decided the contest, was blank. Without vot- 
ing again, the meeting adjourned. 

A few weeks later, two members of the 
caucus were discussing the afiair. 

" To be candid," said one, " I could not vote 
for that scoundrel Bright, and I was afraid to 
compromise myself with the bosses by voting 
for Wynne; so I put in a blank slip of paper ! 
.Just did nothing — see ? Saved my credit and 
did no harm." 

"Just this harm," said the other, gravely. 
" With your vote Wynne would have been 
nominated. Without it there was a tie. A 
second meeting was called. You stayed at 
home and did nothing. Bright was chosen, and 
the city remains in the power of the bosses." 

The great mass of boys in a school, or men in 
the world, herd together to " keep safe." They 
are afraid to take a decided stand for the right, 
hence their accumulated dead weight is thrown 
against it. The man who is civilly tolerant of 
corrupt oflicials, and of drunkenness and im- 
purity in his associates, and the woman who 
follows vulgar and immodest customs, because 
they " do not like to make a fuss," throw blank 
votes in life. The doom of the man who, from 
laziness or weakness, refrained from doing 
right, was the same as his who was active in 
doing evil. Each of us on entering life has a 
blank record to fill for good or evil. Shall we 
spend our years in trying to do nothing, to leave 
it blank ? — Youth's Companion. 



Begin Where You Are. — The man who has 
really resolved to live the best life that he can 
must begin right where he is — begin where his 
failures, his false education, his errors and his 
sins, have left him. By no single stroke of the 
pen can we erase whole pages in the history of 
our lives. We have made or unmade ourselves 
as we are. If we could only begin at some 
lofty hight which our moral dreams picture for 
us, it seems to us that there would be inspira- 
tion in going still further. But we cannot sub- 
stitute in a moment the dream of life for the 
real one. We are surrounded on every side by 
hard and tangible realities. We must begin 
where we are. One who takes a practical and 
sagacious view of what is possible to him in life 
will not burden himself by attempting the un- 
attainable. He will begin when and where he is, 
and do that which lies in his power. Each day 
of life brings its own task; each task accepted, 
each opportunity fulfilled, may be a step toward 
a higher life. Jacob's old dream was not an 
unreasonable one. His angels did not fly to 
heaven; they went patiently up each round of 
the ladder, and they began at the bottom. — 
Christian Register. 



Indian Feast. — About 200 Indians met at 
Camp Independence the Monday after Christ 
mas to hold a feast. The week before, hunting 
parties had been out in the valley and among 
the mountains and a large amount of game had 
been secured, all of which was taken to the 
" big eat." Several noted Indian dancers were 
present, and the first dance came off on Monday 
night; this was the " war dance," and only two 
warriors performed. They were elaborately 
dressed, part of their costume being feathers 
stuck upon their noses. After the grand cere- 
monial performance the dancing became general, 
men and women taking part. The music is a 
low " crooning " kept up by the whole company. 
The festival lasted all week, with dancing every 
evening. — Inyo Independent. 

There is said to be a blind boy in Brooklyn 
who takes dictation on a type-writer faster than 
any known expert possessed of good eyesight. 



*^OUNG pEfoLKS' C[obUMjM. 



The Angel and the Flowers. 

An angel once asked the Father if lie might 
leave heaven for a day and go down to earth 
to visit the flowers and birds and little children, 
for you must know that no other earthly things 
please the angels of heaven as do the flowers, 
the birds and the little children. 

" Yes," said the Father, " you may go down 
to earth, but be sure to stay no longer than a 
day; and when you come back to heaven bring 
me the loveliest flower that you can find, that 
I may transplant it in my garden and love it 
for its beauty and fragrance. Cherish it ten- 
derly that no harm may befall it." 

Then the angel went down to the earth, and 
he came to a beautiful rosebush, upon which 
bloomed a rose lovelier and more fragrant than 
any of her kind. 

" Heyday, sweet rose," said the angel, " how 
proudly you hold up your fair head for the 
winds to kiss." 

" Ay, that I do," replied the rose, blushing, 
albeit she enjoyed the flattery. " But I do not 
care for these idle zephyrs nor for the wanton 
sunbeams that dance among the leaves all the 
day long. To-night a cavalier will come hither 
and tear me from this awkward bush with all 
its thorns, and kiss me with impassioned lips, 
and bear me to his lady, who, too, will kiss me 
and wear me on her bosom, next to her heart. 
That, O angel, is the glory of the rose, to be a I 
bearer of kisses from lover to lover, and to hear 
the whispered vows of the cavalier and his 
lady, to feel the beating of an impassioned 
heart, and to wither on the white bosom of a 
wooed maiden." 

Then the angel came to a lily that rose fair 
and majestic from its waxen leaves and bowed 
gracefully to each passing breeze. 

" Why are you so pale and sad, dear lily ?" 
asked the angel. 

" My love is the north wind," said the lily, 
" and I look for him and mourn because he does 
not come. And when he comes and I would 
smile under his caresses, he is cold and harsh 
and cruel to me, and I wither and die for a 
season ; and when I am wooed back to life 
again by the smiles and tears of heaven, which 
are sunlight and the dew, lo ! he is gone." 

The angel smiled sadly to hear of the trust- 
ing, virgin fidelity of the lily. 

"Tell me," asked the lily, "will the north 
wind come to-day ?" 

" No," said the angel, "nor for many months 
yet, since it is early summer now." 

But the lonely lily did not believe the angel's 
words. Still looking for a cruel lover, she held 
her pale face aloft and questioned each zephyr 
that hurried by. And the angel went his way. 

And the angel came next to a daisy that 
thrived in a meadow where the cattle were 
grazing and the lambs were frisking. 

" Nay, do not pluck me," cried the daisy, 
merrily; " I would not exchange my home in 
this smiling pasture for a place upon the 
princess's bosom." 

" You seem very blithesome, little daisy," 
quoth the angel. 

" So I am, and why should I not be?" re- 
joined the daisy. " The dews bathe me with 
their kisses, and the stars wink merrily at me 
all the night long, and during the day the bees 
come and sing their songs to me, and the big 
cattle caress me gently with their rough 
tongues, and all seem to say, ' Bloom on, little 
daisy, for we love you.' So we frolic here on 
the meadow all the time — the lambs, the bees, 
the cattle, the stars and I — and we are very, 
very happy." 

Next the angel came to a camellia which was 
most beautiful to look upon. But the camellia 
made no reply to the angel's salutation, for the 
camellia, having no fragrance, is dumb — for 
flowers, you must know, speak by means of 
their perfumes. The camellia, therefore, could 
say no word to the angel, so the angel walked 
on in silent sadness, 

"Look at me, good angel," cried the honey- 
suckle; " see how adventuresome I am. At the 
top of this trellis dwells a lady-bird, and in her 
cozy nest are three daughters, the youngest of 
which I go to woo. I carry sweetmeats with 
me to tempt the pretty dear; do you think she 
will love me ?" 

The angel laughed at the honeysuckle's 
quaint conceit, but made no reply, for yonder 
he saw a purple aster he fain would question. 

" Are you then so busy," asked the angel, 
"that you turn your head away from every 
other thing and look always into the sky ?" 

" Do not interrupt me," murmured the pur- 
ple aster. " I love the great luminous sun, and 
whither he rolls in the blazing heavens I turn 
my face in awe and veneration. I would be the 
bride of the sun, but he does not heed my devo- 
tion and beauty ! " 

So the angel wandered among the flowers all 
the day long and conversed with them. And 
toward evening he came to a little grave which 
was freshly made. 

"Do not tread upon us," said the violets. 
" Let us cluster here over this sacred mound 
and sing our lullabies." 

"To whom do you sing, little flowers?" 
asked the angel. 

" We sing to the child that lies sleeping be- 
neath us," replied the violets. "All through 
the seasons, even under the snows of winter, 
we nestle close to this mound and sing to the 



sleeping child. None but he hears us, and his 
soul is lulled by our gentle music." 

" But do you not often long for other occupa- 
tion, for loftier service? " inquired the angel. 

"Nay," said the violets, "we are content, 
for we love to sing to the little sleeping child." 

The angel was touched by the sweet humility 
of these modest flowers. He wept, and his 
tears fell upon the grave, and the flowers drank 
up the angel tears and sang more sweetly than 
before, but so softly that only the sleeping 
child beard them. 

And when the angel flew back to heaven, he 
cherished a violet in his bosom. 



G[oOD ^E^E/VLTH. 



Typhoid Fever. 

Symptoms by Which tlie Disease May Be 
Recognized. 

When a person becomes ill, suffering with 
slight chills, loss of appetite, frequent nose 
bleeding, irregularity of the bowels, coated 
tongue, rapid, weak pulse, a body temperature 
rising about one degree daily until 105 degrees 
Fahrenheit is reached, with fugitive pains, es- 
pecially in the back and head, with progressive 
muscular and mental weakness, and an incli- 
nation to be stupid, the presumption is very 
strong that the patient has typhoid fever, and 
this notion is much strengthened if, with the 
above symptoms, there be a tumid abdonien, 
gurgling on pressure on the right side. 

These symptoms may exist about 14 days, 
and gradually abate, and the patient recover, 
but the patient may, on the other hand, go on 
from bad to worse, and finally be destroyed by 
exhaustion, perforation of the bowels, or bowel 
hemorrhage. If on examination of the body of 
one dead under the above circumstances there 
be found numerous patches of inflamed sur- 
face in the bowel known as " ileum," it is per- 
fectly proper to ascribe the death to typhoid 
fever. The poison of the disease, which is 
probably a microscopic plant, exists mainly 
in the bowel evacuations of those sick of the 
disease. It is true that this substance has 
never been isolated and shown to men as one 
would show a sample of wheat or other seed, 
but it exists all the same, and when a person 
develops the disease it is because he has swal- 
lowed some of the poison with his drink, most 
likely, and it passes along the alimentary 
canal till it finds a good soil in which to grow 
— that is, in the position indicated, known as 
"Pyers' patches," a glandular formation bear- 
ing the name of a learned physician long since 
dead. It is probable that some in vigorous health 
might take small amounts of this poison into 
the system and escape unhurt. A temperature 
of 412 degrees — that is the boiling point — kills 
the poison of all zymotic diseases. Here is the 
sum of the prevention of the trouble: Main- 
tain a high state of the general health and boil 
all suspected water before using. In fact it is 
well to use nothing but boiled water when any 
epidemic disease prevails. Some typhoid fever 
patients will recover by rest in bed, and using 
only liquid food. Others will die in spite of 
the best of attention. These last are either con- 
stitutionally weak or received enormous doses 
of the poison. Enteric fever is the better name 
for the trouble in question. — Medical Journal. 

Where to Dig the Well. — Let us remem- 
ber that a well will drain an area with a 
diameter equal to twice its depth. Therefore, 
a well 12 feet deep will drain an area the 
diameter of which is 24 feet, that is to say, that 
it will drain the surrounding soil for 12 teet in 
every direction. Obviously then the privy 
should be more than the depth of the well 
away from it, and more than this again if it is 
proposed to place it on a higher level, which, 
however, should never be done. The well 
should be lined inside thoroughly with mortar 
so that percolation cannot occur between the 
crevices of the bricks, and it should be well 
covered, so that surface drainage cannot get 
into it, for you want to drink water that has 
come into the well from the bottom, after it 
has been purified by filteration though the 
earth. Thus, then, these are the precautions to 
be observed in locating and building your well 
in the country. How about the city? Well- 
water in the city should never be used; the 
sources of contamination are too numerous and 
too hidden to be avoided. — Annals of Hygii ne. 



Effect of Perfdme.— We learn that an 
Italian professor has recently made some very 
agreeable medicinal researches, resulting in the 
discovery that vegetable perfumes exercise a 
positively healthful influence on the atmos- 
phere, converting its oxygen into ozone, and 
thus increasing its oxidizing influence. The 
essences found to develop the largest quantity 
of ozone are those of cherry, laurel, clover, lav 
ender, mint, juniper, lemon, fennel and berga 
mot ; those that give it in smaller quantity are 
anise, nutmeg and thyme. The flowers of the 
narcissus, hyacinth, mignonette, heliotrope and 
lily of the valley develop ozone in closed ves 
sels. Flowers destitute of perfume do not de 
velop it, and those which have but slight per 
fume develop it in small quantities. Reasoning 
from these facts, the professor reccommends 
the cultivation of flowers in marshy districts, 
and all places infested with animal emanations, 
on account of the powerful oxidizing influence 
of ozone. 



X)oj^E:sTie QeofJOjviY. 



Hints for Resting and Working. 

[Written for the Rurai, Press by Mrs. J. Hilton.] 
Isn't it delightful and refreshing when one 
goes to the house of an acquaintance exhausted 
bodily, as one has to sometimes, to have her 
say: "Now do lie down and get rested. I 
will see to the child, and I know after you 
have some refreshment you will feel better." 
Yielding to the gentle persuasion, I lie down 
for 15 or 20 minutes., and arise feeling like a 
new woman. 

The first time I ever lay down in an acquaint- 
ance's house in the daytime was quite an 
event to me. I had been used to all kinds of 
kind treatment, but that surpassed them all. 
I had taken dinner with my friend, and as she 
did her own work, I assisted her in washing 
the dishes and sweeping, and that and my walk 
had made me really unfit to do anything else 
but lie down and rest. I was, however, hero- 
ically trying to conquer my exhausted frame 
and be sociable, when I was invited to go up- 
stairs, and when there my friend said: "Now 
let us lie down and rest half an hour, and then 
we can talk again." So giving me a paper to 
amuse myself with, she left me to my own de- 
vices, although she was in the same room. Of 
course I enjoyed my day's visit immensely, and 
have tried to pass on the good idea. Dear sis- 
ter friends, try it the next time you have a 
friend come to stay all day and see how much 
happier you both will be than you would if you 
worried through the whole day trying to enter- 
tain by constant talkingi 

I am supposing that the sisters take a half 
hour's rest after dinner, as every one should do 
when she does her own work, and if any among 
you do not do it, commence immediately. It 
can be done if you set yourselves about it. By 
such rest you can safely count on 10 years be- 
ing added to your life, and instead of the sup- 
per time and evening being a burden, they will 
be a pleasure. 

And another thing : I want you all to try to 
arrange your sewing so that it will not have to 
be done at night. Keep that time for reading 
and recreation. It can be done in most cases 
if you only try. Be content with less work 
done on a garment. Why, I used to think an 
undergarment, especially, would not do at all 
unless a seam was felled down, but I was dis- 
abused of that idea by a friend, and I rarely 
go over a seam but once now. The gain in time 
IS very much where one has much to do. 

In another home where I have been lately, I 
also learned of several helps about our daily 
work, and I will mention part of them, as they 
may be of benefit to others. One is to varnish 
shelf papers. They keep clean longer and can be 
wiped off occasionally. For shelves near a stove, 
put on oilcloth ; white I like best. It is much 
less trouble to wipe off with a wet cloth than to 
change papers. 

Another thing is to use oil cans, five-gallon 
ones, with the tops cut off, just inside the edge, 
and the rough places hammered down. For 
boiling clothes in, instead of a boiler, they are 
excellent. Then the different grodes of cloth- 
ing can be kept apart and more clothes boiled 
at once. This economizes the time needed on 
wash days, for most stoves will accommodate 
four cans. 

Another thing is to put all pieces of broken 
bread into the pancake dough. We have a can 
that we mix buckwheat or " shorts " batter in, 
and at supper-time we gather up all the clean 
crusts, broken pieces and crumbs and put them 
into the can and wet with cold water. Half an 
hour or so before bedtime we put in enough 
shorts to make up sufficient batter for the morn- 
ing meal. About once a week or so we start 
with fresh yeast, leaving a little of the batter 
in the can each morning for the next rising. A 
teaspoonful of soda wet up with hot water 
stirred into the batter just before baking makes 
all sweet and nice. The bread crusts are an ex- 
cellent addition to the flavor of pancakes, I 
think. One of my lady friends always puts in 
a small handful of sugar when she puts in the 
soda; it makes them very nice. 

Los Alamos, Santa Barbara Co. 



Soft Soap. 

Will any reader of the Rural, who has a 
good recipe for soft soap made with lye from 
wood-ashes, be kind enough to insert it in the 
paper for the benefit of 

A Con.stant Reader ? 



Snow PuoniNn. — Pour on to three table 
spoonfuls of corn starch dissolved in a little cold 
water one pint of boiling water. Add the 
whites of three eggs beaten to a froth, ponr 
into an earthen dish, and set in a steamer and 
steam 20 minutes. 



Gold Cake. — The yolks of three eggs, a 
scant half-cup of butter, one cup of sugar, two 
cups of flour, one-half cup of milk, one tea- 
spoonful each of saleratus and cream of tartar, 
or two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Flavor 
with lemon. 



Butter-scotch. — A coH'ee-cup of brown 
sugar, half a cup of water, and a dessert spoon- 
ful of vinegar; a piece of butter the size of a 
hickory nut. Bnil 20 minutes. Pour into 
buttered pans, and cut into narrow strips. 



28 f ACIFie I^URAb PRESS. 




A. T. DKW KY. \V. n. KWER. 

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SAN~B^ANCISOO: 

Saturday, January 8, 1887. 
TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



EDITORIALS.— Essex Swine; Fruit Shipping; Grape 
Growers' .Meeting; Harvesting Corn by .Machinery, 21. 
The Week; .Self-.Murder and Society; The Kxperiment 
Station Bill; Kamie and Jute, 28. Fjod Adulteration 
and Congress; Statistics of Indian Wheat Shipment; 
CAlifornia Cork; Meat Values Abroad; A Dciublc Calla, 
29. A New Traction tngine for Faim and Koad Use, 
33. 

ILiLiUSTRATIONS.— Thoroughbred Kssex Swine— 

Imported Grecnbush and Consort, 21. A Double 

Calla found in a San Francisco Garden, 29. New He. 

sign for Traction Engine, by Jacob Price, of San Le- 

andro, Cal., 33. 
COKHESPONDENOE.— Glimpses of San Diego 

County; Trapping Goobers, 22. 
THE DAIRY.— San Mateo County Dairies, 22. 
THE STOCK YAKD.— Official Statement About 

Pleuro-Pneunionia; What Is the Reason of It; Hereford 

Cattle, 22. 

THE APIARY.— Bee-Keeping in the Hills Near Sali- 
nan. 22. 

POOLiTRY YARD.— Notes on Poultry Buildings, 
23. 

THE FIELD.- Distribution of Cuttings and Scions, 
23 

PATRONS OF HUSBANDRY.^-Railroad Pool- 
ing: Installation at St. Helena; The Senatorship; From 
the National Lecturer; Grange Fllections; Grange Work 
and Progres:*; Installation ai Hay wards; Grange Items; 
Instalhition at Vuba City; Sacramento Grangers' Busi- 
ness Association; Stockton Notes, ii4. 

AGRICULTURAL NOTBo— trom the various 
countiCTi of California, 24-25. 

FRUIT .SHIPPING.— Announcement by the Fruit 
Union; Svstems of Distribution Proposed; Note froni 
Mr. Wein',toik, 30. 

ENTOMOLOGICAL.— Fighting the Codlin Moth, 
30. 

THE LUMBERMAN.— Our Lumber Kesourecs; 
characteristics of G>>od Tioiber; Timber Depredations 
in Oregon; California Forests, 31. 



Business Annoancemeiits. 

New Music— Oliver Ditson & Co., Boston. 

Nurseries— P. J. Keller & Co., Oakland. 

Seeds— Trumbull a; Beebe. 

Washing Machines -J. Worth, St. Louis, M". 

Incubators— John Worswick, Grangcville, Cal. 

Figs— W. M. Williams, Fresno, Cal. 

Groceries — American Mercantile Union. 

Harrows — Arthur Bull. 

Seeds— S. Wilson, Uechanicsville, Pa. 

trSee Advertising Columns. 



The Week. 

The delightful weather has returned, all too 
Boon. The storm from which we hoped so 
much last week fell short of our expectations 
and made but a small contribution to the rain 
record. Apprehension is, of course, felt for the 
character of the season, but there is yet time 
for it to retrieve itself. One only has to re- 
member several recent years where the rain has 
held aloof till late in .January, and still has been 
abundant afterward. AVe await similar expe- 
rience this year. 

The Legislature is in session and the brand- 
new corps of State officers are in their places in 
the State Capitol. There are many important 
and interesting matters pending, and all should 
watch the course of legislation and not hesitate 
to aid their representatives with full expression 
of their views and wishes on important ques- 
tions. Our columns are open for discussions on 
legislation as related to agricultural and general 
industrial interests and the public welfare. So 
far as our acquaintance goes, the Legislature 
has good men in it, and we shall expect them to 
■\ct wisely. 



Self-Murder and Society. 

The frequency with which men and women, 
and even children, resort to suicide as a means 
of escaping real or imaginary evils, is a subject 
of almost daily comment. Scarcely a paper 
issues that does not chronicle a fresh case of 
self-mnrder. From what cause springs this 
alarming tendency to self-destruction ? Our 
social philosophers, insurance men and frater- 
nal men are toiling at the problem. When it is 
proved before a coroner's jury that the suicide 
had domestic trouble, or reverse of fortune, or 
was intemperate or in poor health, or had been 
disappointed in love or ambition, all inquiry 
ceases. But a good theory is one that seeks to 
group all the infinitely various determining 
motives in the unity of one primal law. Can 
such a law be discovered ? In what direction 
shall it be sought ? The great Italian alienist, 
Henry Morselli, in his elaborate essay on sui- 
cide, says : " The motives which impel the 
suicide to <iuit life are not beyond social laws ; 
indeed, man would never have destroyed him- 
self if he had lived far from other men, and had 
not shared in the misery of his fellow-creatures. 
The more humanity advances, the more it tends 
to the common association of forces ; therefore, 
the savage appears to be freer in his virgin forest 
than the civilized man in his splendid cities." 
Here is foreshadowed, perhaps, the direction 
in which the final solution may yet be found. 

In the mean time it is evident that the or' 
ganizations of capital and labor have robbed 
both rich and poor of their individuality and 
made all men mere parts of a machine. Before 
the era of railroads and steamboats and tele- 
graphs every shoemaker, tailor or blacksmith 
had his own shop, but now these and all other 
forms of artisanship are merely parts of a ma- 
chine, and this machine usually takes the form 
of corporate control. Even the men who man- 
age the machine are parts of the mechanism. 
Life is reduced to a time-table. We eat and 
run to work by the ring of a bell or the shriek 
of a steam whistle. In short, nearly everything 
pertaining to existence in these days is so nicely 
adjusted that life has become a treadmill 
monotony, and perhaps it is not too much to say 
that nine out of ten who commit suicide are im- 
pelled to it by the dull and joyless barrenness 
of their lot. 

Then, no doubt, many men and women com- 
mit suicide in these days not because they have 
loved and lost, but because they are unable to 
find anything to love. How many men and 
women can say that they have one true, tried 
and devoted friend ? AVe once knew a man 
who advised all his acquaintances when they 
were in trouble to go and tell their wants and 
grievances to the wooden Indian that stands be- 
fore the cigar store. He believed that half the 
world would agree with him that the advice 
was good. It is at least certain that one reason 
of the frequency of suicide is the fact that 
everything is so arbitrarily and nicely adjusted 
that there is no time nor room for friendships. 
Whatever may be the immediate cause, we may 
be certain that life to the unfortnnite has be- 
come void and barren of hope. Men of the 
church, men of our fraternal Orders, think of 
this ! You may help to remedy this evil in 
some degree. It is obvious that the only cure 
is in the nature of a preventive; in whatever 
more evenly distributes the burdens of life and 
helps to make the world more bright, joyous 
and beautiful. 

The Experiment Station Bill. 

The December meeting of the State Horti- 
cultural Society fell on the day before the New 
Year's holiday, and the attendance was small. 
Certain matters of business were announced, 
but as they will come formally before the Jan- 
uary meeting and be acted upon then, we defer 
the report until that time. For the January 
meeting it was decided to discuss orchard pests 
and best materials and methods in spraying. 
.State Inspector Klee has agreed to address the 
meeting on that subject and give the results of 
bis latest researches. The meeting will be held 
at Irving hall, Jan. 2Sth, and all interested in 
insect fighting are invited to be present. 

One item of business transacted at the Decem- 
ber meeting which is of general interest was the 
passage of resolutions approving the congres- 
sional bill to provide for experiment station 
work. This measure is now before Congress, 
and will pass if those who approve it will notify 
their representatives at Washington of the 



fact and ask them to advance the measure. 
There seems to be no opposition, and it is 
only necessary to show the popular demand, to 
take up the bill out of its order and make it 
a law. All who have friends in Congrees, 
whether representing their district or not, will 
do well to address them upon the subject, and 
all petitions or resolutions adopted by the 
Granges or other agricultural organizations 
should be forwarded to Washington without 
delay. The following action was taken by 
the State Horticultural Society at its last 
meeting : 

Whereas, It is understood by this society 
that the Hatch bill, which provides for the establish- 
ment and endowment of experiniental stations in 
connection with the several agricultural colletjes, has 
been favorably reported upon by coniniiitees of both 
Houses of { ongress, but is in d inger of not being 
reached at the present session, unless taken up out 
of its regular order; and 

Whereas, This measure is of exceptional interest 
to Calilornia, on account of the great variety of soils 
and climates existing within the Slate, which daily 
bring our farmers face to face with untried industries 
and problems, requiring systematic and scientific in- 
vestigation for their prompt solution, in the interest 
of industrial progress; 

Therefore. Appreciating the great practical im- 
portance ol the proposed measure, we earnestly re 
quest our senators and representatives in Congress 
to use every effort to spetdily bring the bill before 
that body and to secure its' passage. 

Ramie and J ate. 

Last week we alluded to the possibility of 
profit in growing flax fiber in this State for the 
twine-makers, even if there should be no im- 
mediate prospect of the higher use of the fiber 
in linen manufactures. In the University dis- 
tribution described in last week's Ri^kal, ramie 
plants are offered to those desiring a few for ex- 
periment. This fact, coupled with the interest 
which is now active in this city in ramie-fiber 
extracting machines and in the propagation of 
ramie plants for commercial planting, lead us 
to believe that a considerable planting of ramie 
and possibly a considerable investment in ex- 
tracting machinery are to be features of our im- 
mediate industrial future. The people are 
ready for such an activity, and the number of 
people who are inquiring of us about ramie as a 
crop and the chances for profit in it, is large. 
To such we say : 

1. There is no question about the satisfactory 
growth of ramie over a considerable area of the 
State, and there is prospect of success, in varying 
degrees, under a wide range of conditions in 
soil and moisture. 

2. We cannot speak authoritatively of the 
success of the several extracting machines and 
processes which are now receiving considerable 
attention. We have seen fiber extracted by 
some of them and it is excellent, and so far as 
we can judge, it is in the form which will suit 
the foreign manufacturers who at present are 
its purchasers. We have the authority of 
several parties who have examined the machine 
which is now most talked of in this city, that it 
is satisfactory, and we have seen similar as- 
surance in print concerning machines which aie 
being used experimentally in the South and 
Fast. 

■S. Granted that one or all of the machines now 
being shown the public, here and elsewhere, are 
successful, there is something more needed to 
assure the prospective ramie-planter that he 
can safely purchase and set out the plants. 
Before people can be advised to plant ramie on 
a commercial scale, it seems to us some of these 
machines must come into the hands of those 
who are prepared with capital and skill to work 
the crop when grown, and to pay for it. The 
ordinary farmer cannot give up land and time 
and purchase ])1ant8 for a ramie crop, merely on 
the expert assurance that any machine is a suc- 
cess. He must know whether, when he makes 
his cutting of stalks, he can get his money 
for them. He cannot afford to grow the plants, 
purchase the machines, experiment with the ex- 
traction, and stand the chances of some future 
return when the ramie fiber finds a market on 
the other side of the globe. It is necessary, 
then, before one can be advised to go into 
ramie, on something more than an experiment- 
al plantation, that capitalists should take the 
matter up, prove the machines, ascertain what 
it will cost them to extract the fiber, what they 
can get for it when it is in proper shape, and 
then what, after securing for themselves re- 
ward for their enterprise and investment, they 
can afford to pay the ramie grower for his raw 
material. We understand that something of 
this kind is now contemplated or is really un- 
der way — we are not sure which. If it is as 



[Jan. 8, 1887 

yet only projected, we can advise capitalists 
that the subject is worthy their attention. 
There is much unproductive money lying in 
this city. It should be employed in some in- 
dustrial effort. Let its owners, then, look into 
this matter and take whatever wise risks may 
be necessary, with the purpose and in the hope 
of buildin;? up a new industry, which will be of 
great value to the State, if successful. 

We notice there are at present several centers 
of disturbance on the fiber-industry question in 
this country. There has been most heat in the 
matter in New Orleans, and possibly San Fran- 
cisco comes next. We believe that in New 
Orleans there are two machines contending for 
public favor, and the reason the interest crop- 
ped out there is because of the exhibition of 
these machines at the World's Fair and because 
ramie and jute, the plants which it is thought 
will be most profitably handled, are well 
adapted to that region of country. We see by 
the local papers that great efforts are being 
made to organize companies with capital enough 
to purchase machine rights and embark in the 
extraction business. One company whose pros- 
pectus we have seen proposes to buy the con- 
trol of one machine, and having it vested in 
New Orleans, to secure for that city pre- 
eminence in the extraction of fiber and ulti- 
mately in the manufacture of fabrics. We 
have no objection to the capitalists of New 
Orleans buying the control of a machine if they 
want to, and we hope, if they buy it, they will 
make money out of it and build up a great 
growing and manufacturing industry. It seems 
to us, however, very improbable that they can 
by the purchase of any one machine control 
fiber extraction. We have confidence enough 
in California inventors to be assured that they 
will do as much as any other inventors in the 
world can do. It will be interesting, however, 
because of the free talk about textiles in Cali- 
fornia, to mention a few of the statements 
made in the articles in New Orleans papers, 
which are designed to extend the interest among 
their capitalists in this undertaking. We quote 
as follows from the New Orleans German Ga- 
zette : 

Two years' experience has proved that jute and 
ramie can be successfully and profitably cultivated 
all over the Southern States as far north as the 32" 
of northern latitude, the average yield being from 10 
to 30 tons ol green jute, and Irom 6 to 10 tons of 
green ramie stalks. Well cultivated land will reach 
the last figures. 

The pirtiesembarking in the enterprise have cal- 
culated that they will be able to pay producers $4 a 
ton lor green, Icaflesi jute, and $5 a ton for green, 
leafless ramie stalks, thus insuring the latter a safe 
and reasonable profit. 

As far as ihe progress achieved in extending the 
cultivation of these staples is concerned, it is gratify- 
ing to note ih it there has been ordered jute seed, 
for Texas alone, to plant 2000 acres; lor I^ouisiana, 
900 acres, and for .-Mabama, 450 acres. About 250,- 
000 ramie roots have also been ordered for different 
sections of the South. 

, J ute butts, defiberized bv the Luft machine, are 
worth, in the market, $65 per ton; fine fibers, from 
$80 to $90 per ton; ramie, just from the machine 
and dried. $125; ungummed, $240 to $275; and 
bleached, from $500 to $600 per ton. 

For fillers from fibrous plants, growing wild, in 
Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Calilornia, and Flor- 
ida, $60 to $180 per ton cash is paid in the New Or- 
leans market. These wild plants only need to be 
cut and delivered — no cultivation is necessary. 

In 1887 at least 3000 acres of jute will be cultivat- 
ed, yielding an average of 15 tons per acre, for 
which $4 per ton wouM be paid to farmers, netting 
them $180,000. 

Of jute there will be at least 250 acres planted, 
yielding, on an average, three cuttings, of 8 tons 
each, realizing $5 per ton, or $30,000. 

The prospectus proceeds to show how the 
proposed corporation, after paying fiber-grow- 
ers this §210,000 for raw material, could sell the 
extracted fiber for $3!)6,000, which would cer- 
tainly be a very good business. We know 
nothing about the accuracy of these figures; 
they come from those who seem anxious to float 
the stock of the proposed corporation, and must 
be received with that fact in view. 

What we want now in this State, looking at 
the matter from the farmer's point of view, is 
that some responsible company assure us that 
they will pay S4 per ton for green jute stalks 
and per ton for green ramie stalks, or any 
other stated figure for any other stated condi- 
tion of crop, and then growers can take steps to 
determine whether they can furnish the goods 
profitably at the prices offered. The beet- 
growers in the lower part of Alameda county 
grow sugar beets in quantity, because the 
Standard Sugar Company is ready to pay a 
profitable price for them. We want some simi- 
lar assurance for fiber crops. What will our 
capitalists do aboat it? 



Jan. 8, 1887] 



pAciFie i^uraid press, 



Food Adulteration and Congress. 

A national convention is called to convene in 
Washington City, U. C, the 19th of this 
month, for the purpose of securing congres- 
sional legislation against food and drug adulter- 
ation. The evil is national in extent, and it is 
quite impossible to secure uniformity of action 
between the Stites, and the consequence is that 
if one State makes a stringent law, the people 
who live on the borders of a State that permits 
adulteration would be poorly protected. The 
benefit of congressional legislation would be 
that a law preventing the manufacture and sale 
of adulterated food and drugs would be uni- 
form, at least so far as importation and inter- 
state commerce in vitiated provisions is con- 
cerned. It is time something was done, and no 
uniform and vigorous remedy can be applied by 
isolated State action. The extent and variety 
of food and drug adulteration would seem in- 
credible were it not that the facts have been 
officially ascertained. There is scarcely an 
article of food that can be bought with any as- 
surance of purity and wholesonienesa. Trade 
guarantees are worth nothing. If manufactur- 
ers and dealers have no more principle than to 
persist in silently, under the cover of the mys- 
teries of their business, to adulterate and poison 
provisions, drugs and delicacies, there is but 
one redress left, and that is summarily to break 
up the whole business, by stringent legislation. 
A good beginning was made against fraudulent 
butter in the shape of oleomargarine; let the 
good work go on till the market is thoroughly 
purged of this class of frauds. 

The protection of the life, health, property 
and happiness of the people is the primary aim 
of government. It should stand as a wall of 
fire between them and all invasions from with- 
out or violence within; from open assault or 
covert danger. It is for this protection the 
people pay their taxes and give their personal 
valor in time of war. Where does this protect- 
ive function of the Uovernment cease ? Has it 
done all that should be expected when it hurls 
back the invader, subjugates treason, puts a 
stop to smuggling and counterfeiting, punishes 
murderers, burglars and incendiaries ? By no 
means. It should punish the adulterators of 
meat and drink as rigorously as robbers and 
murderers. They are worse than the average 
murderer who kills in a heat of passion, for 
they kill off thousands of innocent people by 
the slow processes and homeopathic doses of 
dirt, nastincss and poison, from the sheer lust of 
gain. The Borgias and others of that accursed 
race were actually less culpable. They killed 
units, while the modern vender of deleterious 
compounds insidiously assails the health of a 
whole community and shortens the average du- 
ration of human life. Better a thousand times 
an occasional dose of poison by a Madame 
Brinvilliers than vile, unwholesome admixtures 
in our sugar, syrup, coffee, tea, pickles, canned 
fruit, lard, butter, oil, curry, and a host o^ 
other articles in every-day use. 



Cats FOR Doo?. — We find in an English ex- 
change a novel suggestion for the supply of meat 
for what they call dog biscuits. Upward of 
9,000,000 kittens are annually produced in En- 
gland, the greater part of which [are destroyed 
and buried, there being no means of utilizing 
their flash at a profit. This being the case, the 
Pall Mail Gazette wants to know why they can- 
not take the place of the meat imported from 
New Zealand and South America for the 150 
tons of dog biscuits which are weekly made in 
that country. If they use imported meat for 
dog feed in England, it might be easier to secure 
condensed California squirrel or Australian 
rabbit than to rear the millions of felines which 
it is convenient to put out of the way ere they 
see the light. There was an effort somewhere 
in the State to make a profit by canning Cali- 
fornia squirrel for European epicures, but it did 
not succeed. Perhaps a better strike could be 
made with pressed squirrel for dog feed. 



Native Persimmons — When we read about 
persimmons grown in this State, we usually 
take it that one of the Japanese varieties is re- 
ferred to ; but this inference appears to be not 
wholly safe, for the Visalia Delta speaks of Mr. 
Griggs receiving from Santa Rosi a box of per- 
simmons raised by his father, J. fl. Griggs, 
who has in his grounds two persimmon trees 
about 18 years old. J. H. Griggs' father 
brought the seed from old Virginia and planted 



it. For several years'jthe'Jyoung trees had a 
hard struggle for life, but by constant care, and 
transplanting a few years ago, they finally be- 
came thrifty and are now about 10 feet high 
and bear heavily each season. The fruit is ex- 
cellent after it has been thoroughly frosted — 
equal to that grown in the " Old Dominion." 



Statistics of Indian Wiieat Shipment. 

It may interest our wheat-growers to know 
that statistics show that something like 
desuetude is overtaking the shipments of In- 
dian wheat — that is, that the annual progres- 
sion in amounts which has alarmed wheat- 
growers has reached its culminating point and 
the advance has ceased. The following figures, 
which we take from H. Cains-Jackson's review 
in the London Farmer of latest-received date, 
are of interest, as showing not only the amounts 
shipped, but the season at which new-crop In- 
dian wheat reaches the European markets, etc. 



California Cork. 

Some enterprising Americans have recently con- 
ceived the idea to grow cork trees in this country. 
They believe they can be successfully grown in the 
climate of California, and steps have been taken 
toward making the experiment. — Si. Louis Globe- 
Democrat. 

The growth of the cork oak in California is 
not a matter of experiment. Its success was 
demonstrated long ago. The distribution of 
cork acorns by the Patent Office about 2.5 
years ago may not have accomplished much in 
other parts of the country, but it gave us a 
start, and there are now trees yielding cork and 
bearing acorns at a number of different places 
in the State, Some time ago we gave a picture 
of the tree growing on Mr. Richardson's place 
at San Gabriel, Los Angeles county. There 
were samples of cork and acorns shown at the 
Sacramento Citrus Fair by H. A, Messenger, of 
Calaveras county. There are trees of similar 
age in Sonoma, Santa Barbara and Talare, and 
perhaps other counties which we do not now 




A DOUBLE CALLiA POUND IN A SAN FBANCI3CO GARDEN. 



Indian wheat shipments have been as follows: 

January — March (old crop). Qrs. 

From Bombay 415,091 

Karachi 297,426 

" Calcutta 24,568 

Total 737.085 

April — June (new crop). Qrs, 

From Bombay 1,309.746 

Karachi 123,480 

" Calcutta 605,588 

Total 2,038,814 

July — September (new crop), Qrs. 

From B.imbay 373,242 

" Karachi 265,441 

" Calcutta 589,698 

Total 1,228,381 

Total shipments for nine months in quarters: 

Bombay 2,098,079 

Karachi 686,347 

Calcutta 1,219,854 

Total 4,004,280 

Mr. Jackson finds encouragement in these 
figures for general wheat values. He says that 
they show that Bombay, after a period of ex- 
treme energy, has ceased to ship largely, and 
they also show that India, for the whole year, 
is not likely to materially surpass what was ex- 
pected of her in the way of shipments. Four 
millions seems a big quantity, but the Continent 
has taken a considerable proportion, and that 
of 470,000 quarters of Indian wheat afloat De- 
cember 1st, 134,000 quarters were destined for 
the Continent. 



remember. The State University is growing 
seedlings from California cork acorns, and will 
be likely to have the trees for distribution next 
year. There is no doubt about the adaptation 
of the tree to the State, as the widely separated 
counties named above all furnish proper 
conditions for its growth. It is, of course, 
a crop whi^h one has to wait some time to 
gather, and therefore needs patience in the 
planter. 

The journal named above, and which men- 
tions experiments as to be tried in California, 
gives some facts concerning the cork trade which 
will be read with interest in this State: 

The average annual importation of corkwood 
into this country, entirely at the port of New 
York, is 70,000 bales a year. A bale weighs 160 
pounds, and is worth on this side of the water 
$•20, making a total value of the yearly importa- 
tion of -SI ,400,000. It comes in duty fre». It 
is nearly all brought over by one firm, which 
has a branch office in New York, the main of- 
fices being in London and Lisbon. The firm 
owns vast forests of corkwood in Portugal and 
Spain, and may be said to control the business. 
With the exception of an inferior kind of cork- 
wood grown in Algiers to a limited extent, all 
the corkwood of commerce comes from the 
Spanish peninsula, where the trees abound not 
only in cultivated forests, but also grow wild 
on the mountains. The tree is like an Ameri- 
can oak, with leaves similar to the oak and 
acorns. It takes 10 years for the bark to be- 
come of proper thickness to be manufactured 
into bottle-stoppers, life-preservers and seine 
corks. When stripped from the tree, it is 



boiled for two hours, cured in the sun for a 
week and pressed into flxt pieces for baling and 
shipping. The denuded trunk, like a hen 
robbed of her eggs, does no'; sulk and quit the 
business, but throws out a fresh covering for a 
fresh spoliation. Oae tree has been known to 
yield a one-half ton of corkwood. Oae pound 
of cork can be manufactured into 144 cham- 
pagne corks. The baled corkbark is sold to 
cork manufactories in the cities. The most ex- 
tensive manufactory in America is at Pittsburg. 
Beside the ordinary demands for corkwood, a 
good supply of the buoyant material, after be- 
ing burned to make it still lighter than the 
original bark, is shipped to Canada and New 
England, where it is made into seine corks. 

Meat Values Abroad. 

The Pacific Coast has always had an eye on 
the possibility of sharing in the production of 
meat for distant parts of the world where 
prices are high. It is interesting to notice that 
the large shipments of meat from the» United 
States, and from South America and Australia, 
have steadily reduced values in Eaglind, much 
to the discomfort of the home producers. The 
London Economist calls attention to a some- 
what curious fact in connection with the mat- 
ter, pointing out how largely the fall there is 
in the inferior class of beef. In the London 
market on January 1st, in each year since ISSl, 
the prices per eight-pound have stood thus, 
contrasted with the values now current : 





Present 
Price. 


1886 


1885 


1884 


1883 


1882 


1881 




d. 


d. 


d. 


d. 


d. 


d. 


d. 


Beef inferior. 


26 


34 


.48 


40 


44 


46 


54 


Do. prime. 


44 


46 


54 


60 


60 


56 


58 


Mutton mid- 














38 


42 


46 


56 


66 


44 


64 


Do. prime. 


52 


52 


56 


66 


78 


55 


70 


Pork large. . . 


36 


32 


38 


46 


50 


5° 


62 



Commenting upon these figures, the London 
Farmer states that before 1881 prices had risen 
sharply from 40d. in 1879 for inferior beef to 
54d. in 1881, and slowly from 54d. for prime to 
58 J. Mutton of "middling" character was 
52d. in January, 1879, against 64d. two years 
later, and it is only 38J. now. Prime mutton 
was COd. in 1879 and 70d. in 1881. From 1881 
to the present time the drop has been 24 par 
cent in prime beef, 26 per cent in prime mut- 
ton, but 52 per cent in inferior beef, and 41 per 
cent in inferior grades of mutton. Comparing 
the prices of 1879 with those now current, in- 
ferior beef has fallen in value as much as 35 
per cent, and inferior mutton 27 per cent, but 
prime mutton and beef have fallen only 13 and 
18 percent respectively, while pork is 22 per 
cent lower. The great fall in the value of low- 
class meat is largely ascribed to its displace- 
ment by the fresh meat imported from New 
Zealand and the River Plata. 

This shows that the shipment of dead meat 
in refrigerating cabins in steamships, to which 
we have frequently alluded, has reached a con- 
siderable amount. Give us an Isthmus canal, 
and this traffic could in all probability be made 
profitable from San Francisco. 



A Double Calla. 

We give on this page an outline drawing of a 
floral freak the like of which we have never 
seen before, nor has such a thing occurred 
under the observation of florists and floricult- 
urists to whom it was shown. Possibly, how- 
ever, in appealing to such a wide circle of ob- 
servers as that comprised by the readers of the 
Rural Press, we may find that the phenome- 
non is not so rare. 

Col. Oscar Woodhams, who [resides at 250 
Clay street, in this city, has a clump of callas 
growing in his yard, and it has always hereto 
fore thrown up orthodox blossoms. Judge o 
his surprise one day last month to see a stem 
bearing the twin bloom which the engraving 
represents. The stem [is single and shows no 
sign of duality below the point where the two 
spathes start, as shown in the drawing. The 
spadix is simple and has the ordinary appear- 
ance. One of the spathes is larger than the 
other, but both are perfectly shaped and sym- 
metrical, and the effect of doubling the en- 
velope is quite pleasing. Who has seen such a 
one before ? 



The World has organized a snowshoe expedi- 
tion, under the leadership of L'.eutenant Fred- 
erick Schwatka, of arctic fame, for the mid- 
winter exploration of that wonderland of this 
hemisphere, the Yellowstone National Park. 



30 



f ACIFie I^URAb) f RESS. 



[Jan. 8, 1887 



3E{r.UIT ^hilPPIJ^G. 



Annoancement by the Fruit Union. 

In calling the attention of all interested in 
the future welfare of the fruit interests of the 
State — whether growers or shippers — to the 
second annual meeting of the California Fruit 
Union, to be held at Irving hall, Sin Francisco, 
January 19, 1887, at 1 p. m., the trustees desire 
to say a few words, to urge all to take particu- 
lar pains to attend this meeting, and to briefly 
outline the various methods, as they have been 
suggested by different persons all over the 
State, for marketing our fruits the coming year. 

In looking over the past year's work, two 
causes seem to have tended most to produce 
unsatisfactory results: 

Ist. The fact that oar fruits were sold in 
sharp competition with themselves, a result 
which \ve sought to obviate, but failed, because 
there were Uco shipping organizations, each 
struggling for existence in the selling markets 
of the East. 

'2d. The failure of the so-called special fruit 
trains to place the fruit at its destination in 
any certain time, and because of this in good 
condition. 

The first condition can be obviated by a 
united action of the combined fruit interest, so 
that there be but one selling agent in each 
large city. 

The latter lies in the hands of a railroad com- 
pany alone. We hope and trust they will see 
it to their advantage to aid and assist an inter- 
est which is alike important to them and our- 
selves — one which will be prosperous if managed 
wisely by the growers, and kindly treated by 
the railroad people. 

We have in this first year's experience found 
many things which must be avoided in the man- 
agement of the second year's business. 

That some mistakes have been made it is use- 
less to deny; some were made at the meeting 
which adopted our code of by-laws — some by the 
trustees. 

Kicause of these errors many have set to work 
to find remedies, and many are the plans sug- 
gested . 

All agree on the one point, that a combina- 
tion of some nature is essentially necessary. 
We all desire success — success for each and all 
— and every one sees that it can only be ob- 
tained by the earnest co-operation of all. 

Some maintain that the best way for us to 
handle our fruits in all markets in the East is 
by the auction plan, and that the existing by- 
laws should be changed to meet the case. A 
copy with the changes, as suggested, is inclosed 
for your consideration. Quite a number of 
others, while they are satisKed that this plan is 
probably the best for four or five of the larger 
Eastern cities, are extremely doubtful if it 
be wise policy to so frame the by-laws that all 
fruit, no matter to what point sent, must be 
sold by this method. 

They would favor leaving the details of man- 
ner of selling more in the hands of the Board of 
Trustees, with the recommendation that the 
auction plan be used in certain named cities, 
but that in cities of less importance they use 
their best judgment as to manner of selling. 

They argue that it is best to put the control 
in the hands of the trustees, a board formed 
alike of producers and shippers, who then elect 
their general manager second only in authority 
to the board. 

They are also to appoint a traveling agent for 
the Union, whose business it is to be in the 
East during the shipping season, with head- 
quarters say, for instance, at Omaha. 

That he be ready to go at a moment's notice 
to any point, and inspect the condition of cars 
on arrival; keep himself fully posted on the con- 
dition of the Eastern markets, prices fruit is 
bringing, etc. ; and have general supervision of 
our Eastern connections, reporting regularly to 
the general manager on this side. 

All expenses to be met by the sum coming 
into the treasury of the Union from the differ- 
ence;between what commission we pay our agents 
and the 10 per cent charged the members for 
handling their fruits. 

Some claim that it were best to have alt agents 
salaried, and employ no commission men ; 
while others favor the forming of a pool of the 
growers and shippers, and sell all fruits for the 
East on orders. 

These and many other methods are suggested. 
We only mention them that you may give them 
thought, and come prepared to assist by your 
suggestions in formulating some plan which will 
be acceptable to all. With all working to- 
gether, we can easily dispatch a train a day. 

Kaough has been sent this year to do it. 
This in the face of a short crop in many locali- 
ties, poor prices in Eastern markets, fair in 
local, and the certainty that the fruit, if sent 
on special fruit trains, would arrive in compara- 
tively poor condition, because of the time made 
by such trains. 

Change the order. Give us such a crop as 
we have every reason to expect next year, rea- 
sonable rates and service from the railway com- 
panies, and our plans so arranged on the other 
side of the mountains that we may expect fair 
returns, at least, and who can compute the 
amount of fruit which will leave the State? 

Judging from our local markets this year, it 
is plain to every one that the fruit must be sent 
East, or, with a full crop, augmented by the 
fruit from new orchards and vineyards, we will 



not receive enough from the sale to pay the cost 
of cultivation; to enable us to do this, we of 
necessity must have infinitely better service 
from the railroad companies. It would seem 
plain to all that this claim can be made upon 
them with much greater force when coming 
from a body embracing all the fruit-growers in 
this part of the State, than when backed only 
by the urgent appeal of individual growers. 

Therefore, let us all come together, with the 
sincere and earnest desire to make as near as 
possible a perfect organization; to lay aside all 
jealousies caused by the work of the past year, 
and all pull together to secure lower and better 
shipping facilities; and having accomplished 
this, to unite on some plan that will be for the 
most good to the most people. 

The attendance of all is desired, whether 
members of the Fruit Union, of any other union 
or association, or of none, as the nearer we can 
all come to working in harmony, that much 
nearer will we be to success. The matter of 
changing the existing by-laws can, of course, 
only be done by the vote of those entitled to a 
voice in the meeting. 

That as full a vote may be had as possible, 
inclosed find a blank proxy, which, if you can- 
not attend yourself, fill out and sign, either for 
some one of your neighbors whom you know to 
be coming, or any one who will be in attend- 
ance, and return same at once to this olfice. 

A. T. Hatch, President. 

S. F., Dec. :i.Hh. 



Note from Mr. Weinstock. 

Editors Press : — I was surprised to find in 
your issue of January 1, 1887, an article from 
the pen of Mr. R. H. Chinn, of X'acaville, under 
the heading of " Mr. Weinstock Proposed as 
Manager," in which he says : " We beg of you 
to give publicity to the inclosed letter from 11. 
Weinstock, who, after urgent solicitation, has 
agreed to serve as our manager." 

I thoroughly appreciate the kindly spirit that 
prompted Mr. Chinn in writinj;; the above, but 
my private affairs will not permit me to be a 
candidate for any position that will demand the 
greater part of my time. H. Weinstock. 

Sacramento, Jan. 2, 



NTOMOLOGIQAI 



Systems of Distribution Proposed. 

In the circular of A. T. Hatch, president of 
the California Fruit Union, published herewith, 
there is allusion to a change in the by-laws to 
meet the auction plan of selling, etc. The fol- 
lowing is the proposed Section 10, which sets 
forth the methods of distribution presented for 
the consideration of stockholders: 

Sbipments, Commission, Guarantee, Pur- 
chases. 

.Sec. io. The Board of Directors shall, by com- 
piling such fects and statistics as may be at their 
command, arrange a table of distribution subject to 
such changes and modifications as the market may, 
from time to time, demand; and it shall become the 
duty of the gentral manager to regulate the dis- 
tribution strictly in accordance with such provisions. 

The directors may delegate, subject to revocation, 
the power to change or modify the table of distribu- 
tion to the general manager. 

The general manager shall appoint, subject to 
contirniation by the Boird of Directors, a commis- 
sioned agent, also an auctioneer in every city east of 
the Rocky mountains that can use a carload or 
more of California green fruits at a time. 

The Board of Directors shall establish regulations 
to control the quality, weight, and packing of all 
fruits offered for Eastern shipment; and it shall bs 
the duty of the general manager, through his in- 
spectors, to enforce such regulations, and to reject 
all fruits offered for shipment that do not come up 
to the standard requirements. 

All fruits consigned by the Union to Eastern 
agents shall be offered, by the auctioneer appointed 
by the general manager, at public auction, and sold 
to the highest bidders for choice of lots; the auction- 
eer's fees to be deducted from the agent's commis- 
sion. 

The auctioneer shall forward by the first mail, to 
every member having fruit at such sale, a copy of 
the catalogue, giving in print the prices realized for 
every lot of fruit sold at said sale. 

Subscribers of stock shall contract with the other 
subscribers that they will not sell any fruits for East- 
ern shipment to any except to members of said 
Union (Eastern shipment meaning east of Ogdcn), 
reserving the right to sell any and all fruits for any 
other purpose. 

Members of the Union shall be privileged to name 
points of destination fcr their fruits, and they shall 
be further privileged to name their own consignees. 
It shall be the duty of the general manager to faith- 
fully observe such wishes, provided, th * space allot- 
ted to such points of destination be not all pre- 
viously applied for, and provided such mem- 
bers agree to have their fruits sold by public auction, 
by the auction -er employed by the Union, and at 
the same time and place at which the fruits consign- 
ed to the agents of the Union are sold. 

The Board of Directors shall establish such rules 
as will give all members an equal chance in naming 
preferred shipping points. .Should the application 
for space to certain shipping points be greater than 
can be furnished, the Board of Directors may enter- 
tain sealed bids from members of the Union, at the 
rate of so much premium per ton, for '.he privilege 
of securing a choice of shipping points for quan- 
tities not to exceed one carload at any one shipment; 
provided, the term for which such privileges are let 
shall not exceed 30 days; and provided, that due no- 
tice to all stockholders be given through the mails by 
the secretary at least five (5) days before the time 
appointed for the opening of such sealed bids, which 
shall be addressed to the secretary, and opened by 
him in the presence of the Board and such bidders 
as may desire to be present; the highest bidder to 
have first choice during the term of 30 days or less, 
and so on, the directory retaining the privilege to re- 
ject any and all bids. 

Division of Profits. 

Seg. II. All moneys received for such privileges 
shall be placed in a separate fund, and at the close 
of the business year shall be distributed among the 
stockholders, in proportion to the amount of fruit 
each will have shipped through the Union. 

.A commission of 10 per cent will be charged on 
all sales. Out of this 10 per cent, the Union shall 
pay its agents, auctioneer charges, and other run- 
ning expenses. 

Dividends of the earnings of the Union may be 
declared by the Board of Directors when, in their 
judgment, the affairs of the Union will justify. But 
in no case shall such dividend be made until all in- 
debtedness shall be provided for. 



Fighting the Codlin Moth. 

The Petaluma Courier of recent date con- 
tained a letter signed "A. C," which we take 
to mean A. Cadwell, the well-known fruit- 
grower. We quote the following: 

I find many who propose to dig up their ap- 
ple trees. .Some say they will sell theirs to the 
drier, while others say there is nothing in 
that; still another says, I will give mine to the 
hogs. Why do they come to this conclusion ? 
Because we have to spray the trees with some 
kind of soap in the spring, we have to put 
bauds on our trees and change them every eight 
days through the season, and all this costs 
money. Then, if we neglect to attend to the 
bands only once, or our neighbor allows his to 
go free, when picking-time comes we find we 
liave very few apples suitable for market. So 
that the difference between hauling our apples 
to the drier, or being put to this trouble and ex- 
pense to ship a few to market, is so little (espe- 
cially if Oregon should ship in about 10,000 
boxes at the same time) that we prefer to take 
the easiest way. This I find is the decision of 
nearly all the small growers. On the other 
hand, some of the large growers say we must 
keep right along, as this is our business, and 
the country must have apples, even if they get 
them from the East, and we certainly can com- 
pete with the East and North, and so we can 
with industry and perseverance, which is re- 
quired in any business at the present day to make 
a success of it. I, for one, have found that by 
spraying my trees in May thoroughly with the 
sulphur soap of Mr. Jamison, of Petaluma, it 
not only destroys the first hatching of the codlin 
moth, but checks the mildew to that extent 
that it will make but little heading afterward. 
Then I put on my bands, examine them every 
eight days, never missing one day. In addi- 
tion to this, on the Ist of August I examine the 
forks and loose bark on the trees, which saves 
much more damage from the pest, and then 
when I pick my fruit I have two men to sort 
the wormy from the good ones, ao that the 
former can be taken to the drier. 

I put my good apples in a house lined with 
straw to keep it cold, then I wet them and keep 
the door open nights, and early in the morning 
close it. In this way I keep the fruit cool 
and moist, which is very essential to their pres- 
ervation and flavor. W'hen these apples are 
packed and placed in rows, one at a time, until 
the box is full, they are then classed as No. 1, 
No. 2 and Xmas. Then comes the pruning of 
the trees, which requires skill, tact and good 
judgment. The trees while young require but 
little pruning, but as they grow older they in- 
cline to fruit spurs, and the pruning should be 
done so as to take off as many of these as possi- 
ble and leave the new wood. But there is a 
difference between new wood and water sprouts, 
which grow up in the middle of the tree. .So 
that the new beginner can plainly see that un- 
less he has enough to take up his whole time, 
there will be but little in it. And I still think 
that a good orchard of apples in a good location, 
well managed, will pay a man handsomely, not- 
withstanding that Oregon and the East are try- 
ing to divide the profits with us. 




A Deep Mystery. 

Wherever you are located you sliould write to Ilallett 
& Co., I'ortland, Maine, nnd receive free, full informa- 
tion about work that you can do and live at h(jnie, mak- 
ing thereby from S.i to S25 and upward daily. Some 
have ma<le over $50 in a day. All is new. Ilallett & Co. 
will start you. Capital not needed, Either sex. All 
ages. No cl.iss cf working people have ever made money 
so fast lieretofore. Comfortable fortunes await every 
worker. .\11 this seeme a deep mystery to yon, reader, 
but send along your address and it will be cleared up and 
proved. Better not delay; now is the time. 



Readers of our paper who will send their full 
name and P. O. address to the Eureka Salt Manu- 
facturing Company, limited, P. O. Box 3241, New- 
York, will be furnished, free of charge, a valuable 
pamphlet on "How to make the Best Butter, " by a 
prominent dairy authority, in beautifully lithographed 
cover, showing portrait in colors of the famous Jer- 
sey cow "Oakland's Cora." 

It Should Always be Borne in Mind 

That time is the only really impartial test of genuine 
merit, and that according to the universal law of 
" the survival of the fittest," few sewing machines 
have withstood this test. Therefore, the only safe 
thing to do is to buy what time has proven to be the 
fittest" — the "Domestic" Sewing Maciii.ne. 

Farmers and Travelers 

Sojouruiiig in Maryj^ville will tiud the Western Hotel the 
Ijest ia the city, being cleau, quiet, comfortable aud reason- 
able in prices. Geo. Wappel, proprietor. 



urns, 
raises, 

is ihd b'i.^'^^^^^^y 
for suc/LTrou6/cs. 

^^^\{(LCk b off/ ^ horn <L. 

You tui 1/ //net \f usM. 



HALL'S 

SARSAPARILLA 

Cures all Diseases originating from 
a disordered state of the BLOOD 01 
LIVER. Rheumatism, Neuralgia, 
Boils, Blotches, Pimples, Scrofula, 
Tumors, Salt Rheum and Mercurial 
Pains readily yield to its purifying 
properties. It leaves the Blood pure, 
the Liver and Kidneys healthy and 
the Complexion bright and clear. 
J. R. GATES & CO. Proprietors, 

417 Sansome St. San Francisco 




PIANOFORTES. 

rXEOl'ALLED IN 

Tone Touch Wdrkmanship and Durability. 

WILI.I.IM KNABE A CO. 

Nos. 204 and 206 West Baltimore Street, Baltimore. 
No. 112 Fifth Avenue, New York. 

Reasons why Sherwood's Steel Harness is 
the Best and should and will be 
Universally Used: 

1.— It h a common sense Ilarnesa. 2. — It Ismade of ma- 
terial that will last a litetimc. 3. — In plowinij, draggin):, 
lougint' anil scrapinit there are no whitHetrees. 4.— In all 
farm work you can ehanifu from plow to wac^on quick. 

5. — In p|i>win^' in the oreliaril, you ran 't bark fruit trees. 

6. — In plowing and eultivatin'; hops it has no eifual. 

7. — In plowing along the fences you can get two furrows 
cioser. 8.— Horses cannot step over the traces, or calk 
themselves. 9. —A small boy will handle plow readily. 
10. — There is no weight on plow beam. II.— Team works 
one-third ea.sier. 12.— There is no chafing, crowding or 
fretting of team. 13. — For man and team it has no eiiual. 
Do not hesitate, but order at once from your nearest 
agent. Address 

TRUMAN. ISHAM & HOOKER, 

San Francisco, Oal. 



ANNUAL_MEETING. 

The regular Annual Meeting of the Stockholders of the 
Grangers' Bank of California, for the election of direc- 
tors tor the ensuing year, will take place at the office of 
the Bank, in the city of San Francisco, State of Cali- 
fornia, on Tuesday, the llth day of January, IS87, at 1 
o'clock p. M. For Grangers' Bank of California. 

ALBERT MONTPELLIER, 

Cashier and Manager. 



CLIMAX SPRAY PUMPS. 

To those in want ol a flrst-class Spray Pump we can 
say that these Painps are, without a doubt, the very 
best Spray Pumps to-day in the market. Made expressly 
for service in the Orchard, anil the only Pump having all 
its parts, \alvcs, etc., made of non-corrosive metal, and 
has received the highest awards over all others for the 
past three years. Send for circulars and prices. 

CLIMAX SPRAY PUMPS, 

18 California St., S. F. 



Jan. 8, 1887.] 



PACIFie f^URAb f RESS. 



31 



IIIhE TlujVlBERJVIAN. 
Oar Lumber Resources. 

The lumber business of California is one of 
our most valuable industries, and one closely 
connected with the development of the State. 
No town or district can materially progress in 
population or wealth without drawing upon the 
lumber interest, and all such drafts add materi- 
ally to the wealth of the State, from the fact 
that our lumber is a natural product of the soil 
and made available only by the employment of 
the labor and capital of our own people. One 
great drawback to the lumber interests of Califor- 
nia is the lack of proper means of transporta- 
tion. The timber resources of Sonoma, Mendo- 
cino and Humboldt and other counties to the 
north are very extensive, and will soon bs made 
fully available by the construction of railroads 
now in progress or in contemplation, wliile the 
extension of the southern railroad through 
Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties 
will open up still other sources of lumber. 
Branch roads will also soon be extended from 
the main line into the western slope of the 
Sierras, which also abound in the finest of tim- 
ber lands. For a brief description of the timber 
region to the north of this city, we cannot do 
better than to copy the following from Harper's 
WeeUi/: 

The cutting of the redwoods is the mam- 
moth lumbering of the world. California has 
no competitor m big trees. They belong to the 
genus Heguoia — a name derived from Sequoyah, 
a Cherokee, who invented an alphabet and 
written language for his Indian tribe — and are 
of two species. They are found in the track 
west of the Sierra Nevada mountains between 
the 34th and 42d degrees of latitude, ranging 
in hight from 200 to 400 feet and in diameter 
from 8 to 25 feet. 

In Sonoma, Mendocino and Humboldt coun- 
ties, reaching from the Golden Gate to Oregon, 
are immense redwood forests covering an area 
from 2 to 20 miles wide and nearly 200 miles 
long, from which millions of feet of lumber are 
now cut annyally. Redwood is the most val- 
uable timber in the State. As yet no railroad 
traverses this territory, but work has been be- 
gun on lines which will soon bring the lumber- 
ing camps within easy reach of the market. 
The redwood is a coniferous evergreen, resem- 
bling in some respects the cypress. The wood, 
which is extensively used on the Pacific Slope 
for building and is seen in recent houses in Bos- 
ton and Chicago, is of a fine red color, but fades 
slowly when exposed to the light. The shrink- 
age is principally lengthwise, and in California 
the wood is very popular. The timber land is 
exceedingly valuable, as single trees are often 
worth $600 or $700, the current price of red- 
wood being $16 to $30 per thousand. A trip 
to a redwood lumbering camp is full of interest. 



Characteristics of Good Timber. 

There are certain appearances which are char- 
acteristic of strong and durable timber, to what 
claes soever it belongs. 1. In the same species 
of timber, that specimen will, in general, be the 
strongest and most durable which has grown 
the slowest, as shown by the narrowness of tfce 
annual ringc. 2. The cellular tissue, as seen in 
the medullary rays (when visible), should be 
hard and compact. 3. The viscular or fibrous 
tissues should adhere firmly together, and 
should show no wooliness at a freshly cut sur- 
face, nor should it clog the teeth of the saw 
with loose fibers. 4. If the wood is colored, 
darkness of color is in general a sign of strength 
and durability. 5. The freshly cut surface of 
the wood should be firm and shining, and should 
have somewhat of a translucent appearance. A 
dull, chalky appearance is a sign of bad timber. 
6. In wood of a given species, the heaviest 
specimens are in general the stronger and more 
lasting. 7. Among resinous woods, those which 
have least resin in their pores, and among non- 
resinous woods, those which have least sap or 
gum in them, are in general the strongest and 
most lasting. 8. It is stated by some authors 
that in fir wood that which has most sap wood, 
and in hard wood that which has the least, is 
the most durable; but the universality of this 
law is doubtful. Timber should be free from 
such blemishes as clefts or cracks radiating from 
the center, " cup shakes " or cracks which par- 
tially separated one annual layer from another; 
"upsets," where the fibers have been crippled 
by compression; " rindgalls," or wounds in a 
layer of the wood, which have been covered and 
concealed by the growth of subsequent layers 
over them, and hollows or spoony places, in the 
center or elsewhere, indicating the commence- 
ment of decay. — Prof. Raukhie. 

Timber Depredations in Oregon. — The 
Capital Lumber Company, of Salem, Oregon, 
is charged with cutting upon the public domain 
of that State 3,200,000 feet of lumber, valued at 
the mill at $14 per thousand, or $45,000 in the 
aggregate. Some time ago the company, fear- 
ing prosecution, offered the Government in com- 
promise $5000. The Solicitor of the Treasury 
sent the ofter to the Attorney-General, who di- 
rected the United States District Attorney for 
Oregon to investigate and report. He did so, 
and recommended that no compromise should 
be accepted for a sum less than the value of the 
stumpage, $32,000. Litely the company made 
another offer to compromise in the sum of $10,- 



000, and it was accompanied by a recommenda- 
tion from the District Attorney that that sum 
be accepted. In explanation of this the Dis- 
trict Attorney reported that upon further in- 
vestigation he had found that the agent who 
had investigated and reported upon the depre- 
dations had not valued the stumpage at all, but 
had lain " sodden drunk " in a cabin while two 
persons he had deputed, but who were not 
familiar with the lines, did the counting. The 
prosecuting attorney fears that the effect of such 
a revelation upon a jury would destroy his 
case, and he thinks it safer to compromise. 
The Secretary has ordered a new investiga- 
tion of the facts and the case carried to a pros- 
ecution unless settled. The timber agent 
charged with drunkenness was for a long time 
connected with the homestead division of the 
General Land Office. 



California Forests. — The New York Post 
of Nov. 29th had this to say about California 
forests: California is becoming aroused to the 
necessity of doing something to preserve her 
forests. Abundantly as she was supplied by 
nature with trees, the destruction wrought by 
the woodman's ax, aggravated by the devasta- 
tions of mountain fires, often recklessly started, 
have caused really an alarming diminution of 
the acres of timber in all parts of the State. 
The State Board of Forestry at last shows some 
activity, and proposes to submit to the Legis- 
lature a recommendation for the protection of 



Early Canadian Settlements in the 
Willamette Valley. 

Of the beginnings of agricultural pursuits in 
the Willamette valley, Hubert Howe Ban- 
croft's " History of Oregon" gives the following 
account: 

In 1828, the whole Northwest territory was 
under the rule of the Hudson Bay Company 
and John McLaughlin, the company's Gov- 
ernor at Fort Vancouver. One of the compa- 
ny's employes, Etienne Luoier, whose time had 
expired, asked the Governor if he believed the 
Willamette valley would ever be occupied by 
settlers. The latter replied that wherever 
wheat grew there would be a farming commu- 
nity. Lucier then asked what assistance would 
be given him should he settle as a farmer. 
The Hudson Bay Company was bound under 
heavy penalties not to discharge their servants 
in the Indian country, but to return them to 
the place where they had been engaged. Mc- 
Laughlin was in favor of making settlements, 
and devised a plan to keep the men in the 
country without acting against the letter of the 
charter: First, to avoid the penalty, the 
men must remain on the company's books as 
servants; but they might work for themselves 
and no service would be required of them. 




growing timber and the encouragement of for- 
est culture. There is also evidence that pub- 
lic sentiment is becoming aroused to the sense 
of the fact that even the natural resources of 
California cannot forever withstand the reck- 
less waste which always characterized her 
people. 

Some idea of the lumber interests of Los 
Angeles may be obtained when the fact is made 
known that on an average over a million feet 
of lumber of various kinds is used there and 
thereabouts every month. Nearly 200 vessels 
of various classes are employed in transporting 
to that market the products of the lumber 
mills up the coast all the way from Mendocino 
to Puget Sound and even further north. Possi- 
bly the most prosperous of all commercial pur- 
suits in Los Angeles is the lumber interest, and 
those interested are among the city's most en- 
terprising and energetic business men. 

Cutting Young Pine Trees. — The too com- 
mon practice of cutting young pine trees for 
fuel and poles, which have grown up along the 
base of the Sierras where the heavy timber was 
taken off years ago, should in some way be dis- 
couraged, for if allowed to grow it would not be 
many years before the denuded mountains 
would again be clothed in their pristine beauty. 
— Beno Gazelle. 



Treatment of Fallen Timber. — A Gov- 
ernment inspector of timber in France rec- 
commends for timber used in ship-building one 
year's immersion in river water, two years in 
fresh, or three in brackish water, constantly 
being changed, to be followed by two years of 
air seasoning. 



Don't Fail to Write. 

Should this paper bo received hy any subscriber who 
does not want it, or heijund the lime he intends to pa;/ 
for it, let him not tail to write us direct to stop it. A 
postal card (costing one cent only) will suffice. We will 
not knowingly send the paper to any one who does not 
wish it, but if it is continued, through the failure of the 
subscriber to notify us to discontinue it, or some irre- 
s[Jonsible party requested to stop it, we shall positively 
demand payment tor the time it is sent. Look carkpully 
AT THE LABEL O.N YOUR fATBR. 



Second, they must all settle together and not 
scatter about among the Indians, with whom 
their half-breed children would be taught by 
their mothers to sympathize, making them dan- 
gerous neighbors; while by keeping their Indian 
wives among themselves exclusively, these 
women would serve as hostages for the good 
conduct of Atheir relatives in the interior. 
Third, each settler must have 50 pounds ster- 
ling due him to supply himself with clothing 
and implements, which rule was designed to 
make them saving and industrious, and by mak- 
ing their farms cost them something, attach 
them to their homes. Fourth, seed for sowing 
and wheat to feed their families would be 
loaaed thern for the first year, and two cows for 
an indefinite period. These were the terms 
which only secured the better class of Canadi- 
ans as settlers, and kept the idle and dissolute 
from becoming incorporated with them. The 
American trappers, having no credit on the 
company's books, were nevertheless assisted in 
the same way and to the same extent, as the 
best means of making them good citizens in- 
stead of roving firebrands among the Indians. 
At the end of the first three years all the set- 
tlers, French and Canadian, were out of debt. 

Percheron Horses — A Valuable Commen- 
dation". — The exhibition of fine horjes in connec- 
tion with the annual American Fat Stock Show at 
Chicago has become a very attractive feature. At 
the late exhibition for i886 the show of draft horses 
was exceptionally grand. Tlie finest specimens of 
Clydesdale, English draft, Shire and Perclierons 
were present in large numbers from all parts of the 
country, and evoked the admiration of the thousands 
of visitors. The most notable cxiiibit, and the cen- 
ter of attraction, was that of beautiful black Perche- 
rons, of the royally-bred Brilliant family, from the 
Oakiawn stud of M. W. Dunham, Wayne, Illinois. 
While looking at them, admiring their splendid pro- 
portions, one of the visitors, Mr. Heineman (the 
most extensive country buyer of horses in the United 
States, who supplies with draft horses the great horse 
dealer of New York, I. H. Dalilman), said: "I 
would give $50 more for a draft horse showing 
strong marks of f-'rench blood than for any other 
breed. '' Coming from such a competent judge of 
the value of horses, this Is a high compliment to the 
Percheron breed, and valuable information to those 
breeding horses for the market. 



A Blessing. 



Nothing adds more to the security of life, of 
happiness, and of health, than a safe and re- 
liable family medicine. S. L. R. has won for 
itself the appellation of "the family blessing." 
If a child has the Colic, it is sure, safe and 
pleasant. If the father is exhausted, over- 
worked, debilitated, it will restore his failing 
strength. If the wife suffers from Dyspepsia, 
Low Spirits, Headache, it will give relief. If 
any member of the family has eaten anything 
hard to digest, a dose of the Regulator will 
soon establish good digestion. It gives refresh- 
ing sleep even in cases where narcotics have 
failed. It is a preventive, perfectly harmless, 
to begin with, no matter what the attack, it 
will aflbrd relief. No error to be feared in ad- 
ministering; no injury from exposure after 
taking; no change of diet required; no neglect 
of duties or loss of time. Simmons Liver 
Regulator is entirely vegetable and is the purest 
and best family medicine compounded. J. H. 
Zeilin & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., sole proprietors. 




■■HE H. H. H. Horse Liniment puts 
now life into the Antiquated Horse 1 
For the last 14 years the H. H. H. Horse 
Lmiment has been the leading remedy 
among Farmers and Stockmen for the 



, T>t ; - ^u equa» 

tor KhenmaUnm. Npuralgia, Aches. Pams, 
Bruiswi, Cuts and Sprains of all charaotere. 
Ihe H. H. H. Liniment has many imita- 
tions, and wo canti<m the Public to see 
that the Trade JIark " H. H. H." is on 
every Bottle beforo purchasing. For sale 
everj-where for 50 cents and $1.00 per 
Bottle. 

For Sale by nil Druggists. 

OYSTERS, Wagner's, 2-lb 14 cts 

OLAIVIS, 1-lb , 14c.. 2-lb 22 cts 

CORNSTARCH 6 Cts 

JELLIES, Assorted, 2-lb 15 cts 

LARD, 5-lb. cans. 35c., 10-lb 60 cts 

MATCHES, 1203..- 4 cts 

CORNED BEEF, 2-lb 17 Cts 

PICKLES, 5 gal kegs 70 cts 

And all other goods equally Low 

AT 

AMERICAN MERCANTILE UNION, 

24 & 26 Ellis Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 
^Write for Price List.^Sli 



WGENTS W HNTED 

MISSOURI 



TO SEIxI. 

-THE— 




STEAM WASHER 



To men and women of fioort 
character. siH-k ill L,' iinjtiialile 
employment, exclusive tor- 
lilory will bp Riven with 
;it<cricy. Teams can housed 
in advantage hy agents in 
country districts. The Wash- 
er is made of metal, size 
rJx^J inches at base, and 
works on anew principle, which sa\(-* lahor mai vcl- 
ously. Sample shipped on a week's trial on IllM ral 
terms. Its great merit enables agents to earn $,"50 
to $-jOO per month. Write lor illustrated circular 
and terras of agency. ... WORTH, .Solo Ull'r.' 
iriO Franklin. Ave., fST. I^OIII.S, Mo. ' 
Or P. O. Box 10(iS, San Francisco, Cal. 




speviaIj offer. 

I will ship, in localities where, 8s yt t, I 
have No ActiNT, 1 sample "New Becker" 
Washer and ''Empire" Wringer at w'holk- 
sALE prices. E. W. .VIELVIN, Propr. 
OlKce, 80G J St., Sacramento, Cal. 



HATCH CHICKENS 

WITH Till-: 

PETALUMA INCUBATOR 

THE MOST SUCCESSFUL, 
MACHINE MADE. 

Three Gold Medals, Cue Silver Med- 
al and Fifteen First Premiums. 

Hatcbesall kinds of Eggsr 

agrSend for larg" Illustrateil Circular and see how yo 
may get AN INCUBATOR FREE. Address 

Petaluma Incubator Co., Petaluma, Cal. 




A NEW COLONY 

On the new extension of Southern Pacific RailroadB, 
on the lands belonging to K. T. BUELL, Esq., near Los 
Alamos, Santa Barbara county, Cal. Parties deeiring to 
visit the property now, oan go via San Luis Ohispo and 
take the cars from thence to Lcs Alamos, thence by stage 
to the Colony. 20,000 acres of the best lands in Cali- 
fornia, subdivided into '20,40 and 80-acre farm^; $20 to 
*30 per acre. INTERNATIONAL IMMIGRANT 
UNION, 401 California St., San Francisco. 



nEAFNESS 



Its causes, and a new and suc- 
cessful CUKK .it your own 
home, by one who was deaf 
U twenty-eight years. Treated by mo't of the noted 
specialists without bemtit. Cured himself in three 
months, and since then hundreds of others. Full par 
ticulars sent on application. 

T. S. PAOE, No. 41 West 3Ist St., New York City. 



32 



fACIFie I^URAb f RESS. 



[Jan. 8, 1887 



^dljcatiopal. 



California Military Academy, Oal<land, Cal. 




Special Feature— Commercial Department. Next Term 
begins Monday, Januarj 3, 18S7. Send for circular. 

COL. W. H. O'BRIEN, Principal. 




LIFE SCHOLARSHIP, 



Full Business Course. 

SIX MONTHS' COIVIBiNED COURSE, $75. 

Including the Business Course, Academic Course, Mod- 
em Languages, Telegraphy, Shorthand, Type-Writing, etc 

Ladies admitted into all Dupirtments. Day and Even- 
ing Seaaions during the entire year. 

gWCuuL OR Send for Circi'lars. 




'fl BUSINESS 



COLLEGE, 

46 OTarrell St.j'^fe" San FraEcisco. 

"OUE COLLEGE LEDaER," 

Containing full particulars regarding the College 
Departments, Courses of Study, XermSi etc. will 
be mailed free to all applicants. 



THE OAKS, 

T li o H o na. o S c o o 1 , 

OAK ST . OAKLAND, CAL. 

Departmcnta — English and Classical, Modem Lan- 
guages, Drawing and Painting, Music and Physical Cult- 
ure. Lessons, private and classes. t^TuE Nbxt Term 
will begin on Wednesday, January 5, 1387. 

MISS L. TRACY, formerly ol 629 Hobart St., recently 
of 1325 Telegraph avenue. 



8XOCKXOJJ 
* Teleg^raptk Institute 

NORMAL. SCHOOL. 

Open day and evening for 

both sexes. Expenses less C/yOyj VVS ^7 ^ 

than one-half the usual Sj'^ C-t-r/.-K-^ 

rates. Excellent board in ff 

private families from $8 to $10 per month. Ad. 

■iress. for College Journal and Circulars, 

J. C. BAINBRIDQE, Principal. Stockton, CaL 



MISS BISBEE'S 
SCHOOL FOR YOUNG LADIES 

AND LITTLE GIRLS 

Will Re open in the New Building, 
7tli Ave. and 16th St., East Oakland, 

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 5, 1887- 



HEALO'S 



BUSINESS 
COLLEGE, 

24 Post St. S. F 

Send for CSrcul&" 



NATIONAL ASSURANCE CO., 

OF IRELAND. 

ATLAS ASSURANCE COMFY, 

OF LONDON. 

B0YL8T0N INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF BOSTON, MASS. 

H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

QlMiKAI/ ASRKTB, 

800 & 31 1 Sansome St.. San Francisco, Oal. 




AMAGICCURE 



Rheumatism, Neural- 
gia, Pneumonia, Pa- 
ralysis, Asthma. Sci- 
atica, Qout, Lumbago 
and Deafhess. 

Everybody should have It. 
Q. G- BURNETT, Ag't. 

827 Montgomery St., S. F. 
Price, 81.00. Sold by all Drug 

gists i^'Call and see 
DR. CHAS. ROWELL. 

Offici— 426 Kearny St, 
Sao Francisco. 



nnni/^ Any Book, Paper or Maeazlne 
[J 1 1 1 1 R ^ * furnish promptlv at publisher's price. 
W V/ W IIW (foy^. tjjg lljlidays. 

RAV TAYLOR & CO., Box 352, OAKLiSD, Cal. 



WEST COAST LAND CO. 



SAN LUIS OBISPO, CAL. 



Incorporated March 27, 1886. 



CAPITAL, 



$500,000. 



DIRECTORS. 
Geo. C. Pkrkiss, 
JoUN L. Howard, 
Isaac Goldtrxi, 
R. E. Jack, 

C. H. PlIILLIPg. 



OFFICERS. 
Jons L. Howard, President. 
Isaac Ooldtrkr, Vice Pres't. 
R. E- Jack, Treasurer. 
C. H. PHILLIPS, 

Secretary and Manager. 



THE PASO ROBLES, SANTA YSABEL, and 
EUREKA RANCHES, 

Recently purchased by the West Coast Land Company, are now offered tor sale iu sub- 
divisions. 

This immense body of land, including 12,00D acres unsold of the Huer Hucro ranch, 
belonging to C. H. Phillips, comprises 04,000 acres of rich, virgin soil. It lies in a compact 
body, in the center of San Luis Obi3i)o county, and ij within from 9 to 20 miles of the sea 
coast. It is covered with white and live oak timber, is one of the most picturesque bodies 
of land in the State, and requires 

NO IRRIGATION. 

It has an abundance of living water, and where not sufficient for domestic use, good 
water can be h»d at a depth of from 10 to 40 feet. It has an average annual rainfall of 21 
inches, exceeding by six inches that of Santa Clara county, one of the most prosperous 
counties in the State. 

The extension of the Southern Pacific Railway from Soledad 
southward traverses these lands for 15 miles throughout their 
entire length, placing the property within eight hours of San 
Francisco. 

These lands are oflered at from 810 to $30 an acre, and are ail susceptible of the hisrhest 
cultivation. In salubrity of climate, productiveness of soil and location as to market, they 
are equal to lands in Los Angeles and other counties, which readily bring from 8100 to 8200 
and upward; and as to price and terms, offer the best inducements to those seeking homes 
on any part of the Pacific Coast. The survey of the 

PASO ROBLES RANCH 

Has been completed. The maps and catalogues are dow ready, and will be sent tree on 
application. 

This ranch, containing 20,400 acres, has been subdivided into 230 lots. It is 12 miles 
from the sea coast, and is 20 miles north and west from San Luis Obispo city. 

This ranch was one of the earliest granted by the Mexican Government and having been 
held by the same party for over 30 years, has never before been offered for sale. It consists 
exclusively of land of the choicest character, and is second to nooe in the State for the pro- 
duction of wheat, wine, fruits, raisins and olives. 



TITLE, U. S. PATENT. 



One-third cash; balance in 4 equal payments at 2, 3, 4 and 6 years; interest, 6 per cent 
per annum. The mortgage tax paid by the mortgagee makes the Interest about 4 per cent 
net to the purchaser. A deposit of 825 will be required in all cases to cover expenses of sale. 

C. H. PHILLIPS, Manager, 
West Coast Land Co., San Luis Obispo, Oal. 
/VSead for Catalogue and Map. 



MACHINISTS, ATTENTION! 

AN OUTFIT FOR A MACHINIST. 

Good Tools, Patterns and an Es- 
tablisbed Business 

FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN, 

If applied for Immediately. 

Address, B. A. W., 
Care of this Paper. 



BRICK 

A Nil 

TILE 




MACHINERY 

BEST IN THE WORLD. 

Sfiul for circular & prices. 

J. W. PENFIELD i SON, 

Willouehb), Ublo. 




'^LMSLock Box 86. 



s ,GLADDING,McBEAN&CO . 

^\SEyVER S CHIMNEY PIPE, ^ 
DRAIN TILE, 
ARCHITEGTURALTERRA COTTA Et 
1358-1360 market" ST. S.'E 



=^MANUFACTORY AT LINCOLN CAL. 



THIS NEW YEAR 

Finds US (as 43 or more new years past have found us) 
still in the fleld and at the front of the music publishing 
business. We offer some 

CHOICE MUSIC BOOKS, 

Among which are to Ik; found the following, which 
teachers, amateurs, and others will do well to examine: 

Song Classics, 

By Rubinsteii], Oounod, Lassen, Jensen, Grieg, and 
others. Price, $1. A sjdendid collection of classic vocal 
music. A large book, sheet music size, beautifully 
printed and bound, and containing about 50 carefully 
selected gems, suitable for all kinds of voices. Many 
of the songs are favorites on the proirrams of the best 
conceits The nmsi; is not dilli :ult. 

Yonng People's llluslraleil History of Mnsic, 

By J. C Macy. Price, 81. Containing short biogra- 
phies of famous musicians, and a condensed and 
interesting history o^ music from the earliest days 
to the present time. .\ll per.-^ons, .\ oung or old, will en- 
joy the book. Portraits accompany ^he sketches. 

Young People's Classics for the Piano. 

$1. \ ery popular collection of the best music in easy 
arrangements. 

Piano Classics 

Is a great favorite with good pianists. Price, $1. 

The Royal Singer, 

By L. O. Emerson; Co cents. New Singing School and 
Choir Book. ^"Scnd for our Catalogue of Music Books. 

OLIVER DITSON & CO., Boston. 



C. II. IHTSON i CO., 



St'i7 Broadwav, New York. 



CONSUMPTION. 

X have a positive remi-tly for the above dlgeftso ; by its nso 
ttaousnndB oT cnsos of the worst kin-t an<l of l<>nf? s'andlD^ 
bave been cured. Indeed, eo Btrnnt: It mv fnith In Its efficacy 
that I win send TWO BOTTLES FREE, inRethfr with a VAL- 
UABLE TREATISE on thlsdisease, ^^^ any sufferer. Give ex- 
press & r. 0. ftaar«ss. PK. T. A. SLOCUU, i«l FearlSt tl. Y 



bapk3 apd bapkipg. 



GRANGERS' BANK 

OF CALIFORNIA. 
SAN FRANCISCO, OAL. 

Authorized Capital, - • $1,000,000 

In 10.000 Shares of $100 each. 

Capital Paid up in Gold Coin, $645,360. 

Beserred Fund and Paid np Stocli, $21,1 7 8. 
OFFICERS : 

A. D. LOGAN President 

i. C.STEELE Vice-President 

ALBERT MONTPELLIER Cashier and Manager 

FRANK Mcmullen Setret»ry 

DIRECTORS: 

A. D. LOGAN, President Colusa Couutv 

H. J. LEWELLING Napa Countv 

J. H. GARDINER Rio Vista, Cal 

T. E. TYNAN Stanislaus Countv 

URIAH WOOD Santa Clara Countv 

J. C. MERVFIELD Solano Couutv 

H. M. LARUE Yolo Countv 

I. C. STEELE San .Mateo CountV 

THOMAS McCONNELL Sacramento Countv 

C. J. CRESSEY Merced CountV 

SENECA EWER Napa County 

CURRENT ACCOUNTS are opened and conducted in the 

usual way, bank books balanced up, and statements of 

accounts rendered every month, 
LOANS ON WHEAT and country produce a specialty. 
COLLECTIONS throuirhout the Country are made. 

promptlv and proceeds remitted as directed. 
GOLD and SILVER deposits received. 
CERTIFICATES of DEPOSIT issued paval.Io on demand. 
BILLS OF EXCHANGE of the Atlantic States bought 

and sold. ALBERT MONTPELLIER, 

Cashier and Manager. 

San Francisco, Jan. 15, 1882. 

THE GERMAN 

Savings and Loan Society, 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Capital and Deposits, July 1, '86 
$13,826,466.. 

LOANS MADE ON REAL ESTATE IN 
THE COUNIRY 

AT LOWEST MARKET RATES 



MONEY TO LOAN 
COUNTRY REAL ESTATE 

AT REDUCED RATE.S BY THE 

SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
619 Clay St., San Francisco. 
i^Blank Forms of Application. 



H. H. BERGER & CO. 




Ueceive through season, by 
every steamer from Japan, 
best varieties of 

Persimmon. Orange, 
Plum and Mammoth 
Chestnut Trees. 

Rarest Ornamental 
Slirnbg Si Plants. 

Camellias, 1 to 12 feet high. 
Azaleas. Rhododendrons, Bam- 
boos, Magnolias, newest Chry- 
santhemums, Tree Poeonias, 
Roses. Send for our new Cata- 
ogue. P. 0. Box 1501. 

Depot, 317 Washington St., 
Francisco. 




I Want AGENTS to SELL 

MiTsOURI 

STEAM 

Washer 

To men or women of euerpy and ability. st-ekinK pro- 
fitiible emplovmenl, excliis-ive territory will (,(« i:iven 
Kith ABCiicy. rlii> \Vi,»hiTismii.lpot iTiHtiil iind works 
on a new priru ii.U' \vtu> li siiv,-^ liilior. clothes niid »on[i. 

Sample sent on a week's trial to be returned 
at my expense ijn^t satisfactory. 

^ ' 1 V year is being made 

hiy competent, shiftr 
'iigenlH. Intrinsic 
merit iiiakin;; it n [.lieimminal Hucce^i* everywhere. 
Sen'! foriiiv illiij-trnted circular and terms of atiency, 

J .WORTH .Sole Man'f'r. 1710 Franklin ave., 
St. Louis, Mo. 

< ir r. 0. Box 19C8, Sa i Francisco, Cal. 



at my expense it nor sarisia 

$600 to $2,000;; 




HORSE POWKR.S, WINDUII.I.8, TANKS 
and all kinds of Pumping Uachinery built to order. 
Awarded Dipluma for WindinllU at Ue- 
ctianics' Fair, 188a. Windmills from Horse 
Powers from fjO. F. W. KROGH & CO., 61 
Beale Street, San Francisco. 



PAINLESS PARTURITION POSSIBLE. 

e0,0OO Sold. TokolOSy, by Alice B. Stockham, 
M. D. , is a NOBLK BOOK for a noble purpogj. Sample 
pages FRBB. Cloth, $2.00; mor.,J-2.T5. 

SAKITARY PUBLISHING CO., Chicago. 



Jan. 8, 1887.] 



fACIFie (^URAlo PRESS. 



A New Traction Engine for Farm and 
Road Use. 

The fact that a common straw-burning trac- 
tion engine will successfully and economically 
drive a combined harvester and thrasher cutting 
25 feet or •ver was demonstrated last season by 
Mr. G. S. Berry, of Visalia. He not only 
proved that it would run a combined harvester 
using straw as a fuel, but that it would also 
pull a gang of 20 10-inch plows, running from 4 
to 6 inches deep, as is now being done daily on 
his place with the consumption of about three 
tons of straw per day. 

This seems to threaten a revolution in plow- 
ing, harvesting and thrashing in our great val- 
leys, for it implies that the power to perform 
these heavy and hitherto expensive operations 
may be found in a small fraction of the straw 
that has been deemed almost useless in our 
great wheat-growing sections. 

The great field thus suddenly and almost un- 
expectedly opened for the use of traction en- 
gines has directed the attention of our inventors 
to their defects and incited them to efforts to 
improve them. 

Among the first to attempt this is an old ac- 
quaintance of the readers of the RtJKAL, Jacob 
Price, of San Leandro, who recently brought 
to this office, for the purpose of securing a 
patent, drawings of the machine, illustrated on 
this page, and which will be fully understood 




pull a load can, within certain limits, be in- 
creased or diminished, as desired. This some- 
what remarkable mechanical effect is produced 
by very simple means, clearly shown in the side 
view. It consists in making the points of the 
attachment of the connecting rods to the 
ratchet levers movable up and down, the result 
being that when said points are moved to the 
upper ends of the ratchet levers the pulling 
power of the engine is increased immensely, be- 
ing at least eight or ten times as great as when 
these points are at their lowest position. In 
other words, the steam, through the medium 
of its engine, is allowed to use a longer lever 
when heavy work is to be done, just as a man 
pumping water naturally takes hold near the 
end of the handle if the pump goes hard. 

The method of raising and lowering these 
points is shown in the end view, but not very 
clearly. The connecting rods are connected to 
a block of metal having a mortise through'it the 
size of the ratchet lever. These blocks therefore 
may slide up and down on the ratchet levers 
freely, but they are connected to long screws 
(seen just inside of the ratchet levers and par- 
allel to them). These screws have bevel pin- 
ions on their lower ends, actuated by bevel 
wheels working central to the main axle of the 
machine and having on their outer edges 
sprocket teeth, which enables them to be 
turned by the chain belt so clearly shown in 
the side view. It will be seen that by turning 
the hand-crank at the front end of the boiler 
(the end opposite the fire-box) the screws will 
be rotated, carrying the metal blocks referred to 
up or down (according to the direction the 
crank is moved) exactly as the head of a 
planer is carried up or down by its screws. 

The importance of this feature in a traction 
engine can scarcely be overestimated. It en- 
ables the engineer to start a heavy load very 
slowly, but with great power, and then to grad- 
ually increase his speed and diminish his power 
after his load is under motion. It also permits 
him to ascend hills that with a positive geared 



The Placer County Frnit-Growers' 
Views. 

Editors Press : — Many fruit-growers in this 
county have been interviewed by the writer, 
and all approve of the plan proposed by Mr. 
H. Weinstock, of having California fruits sold 
at auction in the Eastern markets. 

After more than 20 years' experience as a 
dealer in foreign fruits in the Atlantic States, 
I feel that I may be permitted to make the as- 
sertion that the information gathered by Mr. 
Weinstock on this subject during his recent 
tour through the Eastern States, and given to 
the public through his published letters, is 
wonderfully accurate and comprehensive, and 
the resolutions offered by him are worthy of be- 
ing adopted without material change by the 
fruit-growers at their meeting to be held on the 
19th inst. 

The commission men of this State have 
handled, and will probably continue to handle, 
a large proportion of the fruit consumed in our 
near markets. Their sales, however, are made 
direct and at stipulated prices. Freights, de- 
terioration of fruit while in transit, or losses of 
whatever nature, must be met by the pur- 
chaser. 

For our increasing products there is an insuf- 
ficient demand at home. We have then to 
place thtm upon the markets of the East in 
large lots, in order to secure the indispensable 
low rate of freight. All responsible commission 
merchants in the East have a systematized trade 
and draw their supplies from local producers 
who are naturally prejudiced against the intro- 
duction of foreign fruits, whether from Europe 
or California, and would withdraw their con- 
signments from a house that would give a pref- 
erence to our fruits. As the trade in local 
products so largely exceeds in amount what we 
may expect to have for many years to come, the 



should combine as members of the Cali; 
Fruit Union, or under any other name that may 
be preferred, adopting the plans of Mr. Wein- 
stock to sell our fruits in the East at auction, 
and place him at the head of the organization 
as president and manager. P. W. Butler. 
Penryn, Placer Co., Jan. 3, 1887. 

List of D. S. Patents for Pacific Coast 
Inventors. 

Reported by Dewey & Co., Pioneer Patent 
Solicitors for Pacific States. 

From the official report of U. S. Patents In Dbwbt & 
Co.'s Patent Office Library, 252 Market St., S. F. 

FOR WEEK ENDING DECEMBER 28, 1886. 

3t;5,ii4. — Elevator— Henry Alb-rt, Crescent 
City, Cal. 

3,5,126. — Artificial Tooth— C. E. Blake, Sr , 
S. K. 

355,251.— Hydraulic Dredger— A. B. Bowers 
.S. F. 

355,132.— Adjustable Name-Plate— Brown & 
Roller, S. F. 

355,061.— Washing Machine— SabinaW. Cook 
Dayton, W. T. 

355,143.— Gas Stove— C. A. Cashing, S F. 

354,895.— Baby- Walker— Sarah E. Gleason, 
Tacoma, W. T. 

355 '63.— Sewer System- C. E. Grunsky, 
S.icto. 

354,899.— Force-Blast Cupola— Mark Hamm, 
.Stocktcn. 

355. 179-— Bark-Cutter— R. C. Kirby, Santa 
Cruz, Cal. 




NEW DESIGN FOR TRACTION ENGINE, BY JACOB PRICE, OP SAN LEANDRO, CAL. 



from the following description in connection 
with the cuts. 

It is needless to explain to those who are 
familiar with traction or field engines that in 
all of them the rapid motion of the crank or 
flywheel shaft is reduced and transmitted to 
the driving or carrying wheels by trains of cog- 
wheels. 

The cogwheels thus employed are from 10 to 
14 in number, and add greatly to the weight 
and cost of the machine, to say nothing of the 
large percentage of power that they consume 
by their friction. 

Mr. Price's invention dispenses with these 
entirely. He employs in their place two 
friction ratchets (one on each side) which get 
their motion from the flywheel shaft by the 
connecting rods, as shown. 

These connecting rods get their motion from 
cranks in the main crank shaft just outside the 
main boxes. (See end view.) These cranks 
have only about two inches throw, so that they 
work the ratchet levers back and forth about 
four inches at the point where the connecting 
rod attaches. It is understood, of course, that 
the friction ratchets, like all ratchets, slip 
freely in one direction, but grasp and hold 
firmly in the other. 

The hubs of these ratchets are keyed secure- 
ly to the main axle of the engine. This axle, 
by the alternate motions of the two ratchets, is 
given a constant and steady motion forward, 
carrying the large driving-wheels with it, and 
thus propelling the machine. The driving- 
wheels, like those of a two-wheeled mowei-, 
may slip forward on the axle to permit turning. 

These simple devices, thus dispensing with 
the trains of gearing, appear to be a great im- 
provement, as they save power, reduce cost and 
weight, simplify construction and greatly 
lessen the liability of breakage. 

But still the most important and novel 
feature of the invention remains to be de- 
scribed, viz.: The power or leverage of the 
steam on the driving-wheels may be increased 
or diminished by the operator at will, when 
the engine is advancing or standing still. 

In other words, the power of the machine to 



engine would be impracticable, or to go over 
bad ground or pull out of a ditch. 

These features also adapt it perfectly to oper- 
ating combined harves:ers and thrashers, for it 
must be borne in mind that the engine and fly- 
wheel shaft of this machine runs at a constant 
and unvarying speed, whether the whole ma- 
chine advances slowly or rapidly; hence if the 
cutting and thrashing apparatus of a harvester 
is run from the flywheels the speed will alwiys 
be the same, though the engineer may, if the 
grain be heavy, slow down tlie forward motion 
(thus reducing the amount of straw delivered 
to the thrasher), while, as before stated, the 
thrashing cylinder and sickle runs at full speed. 

The boiler here shown is Tindall's patent re- 
turn-Hue straw- burner. The portion reaching 
forward from the tire-box is oval in form — not 
round. Its thickness or width in this engine is 
34 inches, while its depth is 46 inches. In the 
lower portion, reaching from the fire-box for- 
ward, are several large flues, while in the upper 
portion are the return-tubes. The form of the 
boiler is symmetrical and compact, and its heat- 
ing surface is very great. However, any type 
of boiler or engine may be used, the invention 
relating only to the means used for dispensing 
with the cog gearing and the device employed 
for increasing or diminishing the power of the 
engine on the driving-wheels. 



LoTE Tree Seeds. — The article by Dr. A. 
Kellogg, on Parry's Native Jujube or Lote 
tree, which appeared in the Rural Press for 
Dec. 11th, has awakened a good deal ot inter- 
est. Mr. Abbot Kinney, Chairman of the State 
Board of Forestry, writes Dr. Kellogg that he 
has had in consequence many inquiries for 
plants and seeds, which he has been unable to 
satisfy. Can any of our readers furnish the 
seed or plants ? 

Experiment Stations and California Con- 
gressmen. — Secretary Chester, having trans- 
mitted to our Members of Congress the resolu- 
tion of State Grange, in favor of Mr. Hatch's 
bill for agricultural experiment stations, has re ■ 
ceived favorable replies. 



commission man will, as a matter of policy, first 
sell the goods of his local consignor, who is near 
at hand to look after hjs own interests, should 
he even suspect they were being neglected; 
while the fruit of the foreign owner is wholly 
neglected until the local supply is exhausted, 
by which time it may have become worthless. 

This may occur even when the fruit arrived 
in good condition, and might, perhaps, have 
been sold at a fair price at some point outside 
of the regular trade of the consignee; but if the 
cost of so doing should exceed the commission, 
the effort is liable not to be made, and the fruit 
allowed to be lost, as expenses are all paid by 
the shipper, even if his fruit is never sold. 

There is no way in which a car or more of 
fruit that is particularly perishable or arrives 
in poor condition can be sold to realize so much 
money to the owner as at auction, even if sold 
for less than cost. If, because of imperfect con- 
dition or an overstocked market, it cannot all 
be placed by purchasers among regular custom- 
ers, they then extend their sales to more remote 
points, and perhaps into entirely new fields. 
This fruit that may have been sold at a loss to 
the shipper will then be the means of opening 
a market for increased trade, and may be no 
more expensive than other methods ot getting 
custom. 

It will not do to both sell at auction and pri- 
vate sale at the same time and place, as the 
rivalry would cause the same ditaster to own- 
ers that has occurred in Chiciigo during the last 
season. 

Shippers who are not growers should join in 
this movement in order to avoid the possibility 
of direct competition, and the overstocking of 
any place in the _Eastern markets. Theie is 
little fear that the average producer will desire 
to ship fruit East on his own account, if the 
shipper will buy his entire crop at a fair price; 
but it is quite certain he will not be content to 
let the buyer have the oream of his ciop at 
such times only as may suit his convenience; 
and having no other arranged outlet, run the 
risk of losing the balance. 

It is the opinion ot the people of this neigh- 
borhood that every grower and shipper of fruit 



355,094. — Pneumatic Dredger- W. P. Lewis 
Oroville, Cal. 

354,923.— Extracting Nickel and Cobalt 
FROM Ores— U. MindelefF, S. F. 

355.097- — Water Engine— P. F. Morey, Port- 
land, Ogn. 

355,208 —Heating Attachment for Stoves 
— K. A. Rew, Pomeroy, W. T. 

354,937. — Smoke Bonnet — W. Rose, Sactn. 

355,227. — HiNGK for Boxes, etc. — J. V.Sny- 
der, Sania Maria, Cal. 

354 950.— Fence-Post Base — J. D. S. W. I'. 
Tiltoii, Yakima, W. '1 . 

17,040. — Design — K. M. Gilham, S. F. 

N0T8.— Copies of U. S. and Foreign patents furnished 
Dy Dewey & Co., in the shortest time possible (by mail 
or telei^raphic order). American and Foreign patents 
obtained, and general patent business for Pacific Coast 
inventors transacted with perfect security, at reasonable 
rates, and in the shortest possible time. 



What " Old Fritz " Said. 

It was an aphorism of Frederick the Great that "Facts 
are divine things." An undisputed fact is that Dr. 
Pierce's "Uoldcn Medical Discovery" is tiie most power- 
ful liver vitalizer extant, and by its cliaracteristioa and 
f^earching action will cure dyspepsia, constipation, dropsy, 
kidney disease, 3icl<-hcadache, and other inala Mes which, 
popular opinion to the contrary notwithstanding, are ni- 
rectly traceaOle to a diseased condition of the liver, by 
whicti its work as purifier of tile blood is made incom- 
plete. All druggists. 



"Oh I But I Salivated Him!" 

Was the actual exclamation of an honest physician, 
spoken of one of his patients to whom he had given 
calomel for the cure of bilious ess and a diseased liver. 
And lie l)ad mUcaU'd him for certain, from which he 
never recovered. All these distressing consciiuences are 
avoiik'd by the use of Dr. Pierce's "Pleasant Purgat've 
Pellets," a purely vegetable remedy that will not salivate, 
but proda<;c the most pleasing effect, invigorate the 
liver cure headache, dyspepsia, biliousneis, constipation 
a'nd piles. By druggists. 



The worst cases cured by Dr. Sage's Catarrh Remedy, 



PACIFie l^URAb f RESS. 



[Jan. 8, 1887 



breeders' birectory. 



Six lines or lees io this Directory at SOc per line per month. 



POULTRY. 



H. J. GODFREY, San Leandro, Cal., flrat-class P. 
Rocks and Wyandotte eggs, S2 per setting; no circulars 



PABLO POULTRY YARDS, San Diego, Cal. 
Large eatablialiinent. Send lor catalogue. 



W. C. DAMON, Napa, Wyandottes, W. and B. I*g- 
horns, P. iiouks, L. Brahmas, Pekin I)ucks. 



MRS. M. B. NBWHALL, San Jose. White and 
Brown Leghorns, Langsbaus, Plymouth Rocks, Light 
Brshmas, Pekin Ducks and Bronze Turkeys. 



J As. r. UKO WIM, i5 ueorgia St., Los Angeles, (Jai. 
Breeder of Ihoroughbrcd Poultry of the leading va- 
rieties. Send fur circular and price list. 

CHOICE LAND AND WATERTFOWLS for 
sale at all times of all tlie n\ost popular and profitable 
varieties. Please inclose stamp for new circular and 
price list to K U. Head, Napa, <!al. 

T. u. MO£t±tio, oonouia, xjAi. i'uolouee ana ianDdeD 
Geese, Bronze and W. Holland Turkeys, and all leading 
varieties of Thoroughbred Poultry. 

U. t±. K ViSHETT, leiB Larkin St.,S. F., importer and 
breeder of Thoroughbred Langshans and Wyandottes. 

AXKORD^ IMf ttOVEU liNTfUBaTOlt.— 
iijO eggs. S50; \M eggs, $25. GuaranteB satisfaction. 
For particulars adilress, 1. P. Clark, Mayticld, Cal. 

J. N. LUND, Box lie, Oakland, Cal.' Wj^dottes, 
Langshans, L. Brahmas, P. Itocks, B. Leghorns, B. B. 
R. Game Bantams, T. Guineas. Hoin'g Antwerp Pigeons. 

b. D. BKililiS, L.isGatos. Cal. t^ncy Pou^ry brneoer 

O. J. ALtjEi';, SanrA Olara. Thorouehbred poiilfy. 



)*;. U. C/lj£lf r. Soucn fasuUtiiia, uai. Lignt Braniuas 
and Plymouth Rocks. No fowls for sale. Kggs from 
lirst-class stock, after Nov. 1st. 

OALlFOKNlii; fOUijTKY FARM, StocKton, 
Cal. Send ii-cent stamp for Illustrated Catalogue. 

HORSES AND GAULE. 

R. J . Mt<jRKl<iijEY, Sacramento, OrecUer of Norman, 
P'Tcheron Horses and thorouglibreil Shortliorn^attle. 

tsiaie 01 M. E. URADLEY, aan Jose, Cal., breeder 
of recorded thoroughbred Shorthorn Cattle and Berk- 
shire Hogs. A choice lot of young s tock for sale 

M. D MOfKiMS, Pctiluuia, Cal. Kastern lm|JOrted 
registered Shorthorn Bulls and Heifers for sale. 

HOi-STEINS, AAuGlt, JACOB; NETHER- 
LAND and Artia strains; all ages; largest her I to 
select from. Young bulls, low. (Ad registered.) F. H. 
burke, 4ol .Montgomer y St., 8. V. 

E. jrrUttNEtt.Tlollister, Breeder of Percheron-Nor- 
man registercil Horses and Roadsters. 



E W.o'rEELCi, San Luis Obispo, Cal., breeder of 
Thoroughbred Hols tein and Jersey Cattle. 

UET±1 COUli, UanviUe, "Cook Farm," Contra Costa 
Co., breeder of Aberdeen Angus, Galloways and De- 
vons (Registered). Young stock tor sale. 



f ETER oAXb; SON, Lick House, San Francisco, 

Cal Importers and Breeders, for past 16 years, ol 

e variety of Cattle, Horses, Sheep and Hogs. 

wviijiai^iia ciiLitaa. los Angeies, tJai. inorougli- 

t>ro<i Poultry, Cattle and Hogs. Write for o roolar. 
J^. K. ±tOcil!i, LaKcville, sonoma Co., Cal., Breeder of 

Thoroughbred Uevons, Roadsters and Draft Horses. 
THE Bfiar HEtCD Oi<' JERSEYS, all A. J. C. 

C. registi-red, la owned bv Henr y Pierce. San Francisco . 
PTH MURPHY, Brighton, Perkins P. O., breeder of 

Shorthorn Uurhanis, and Pola nd-China Hoga. 

ONTARE RANCH, three miles west of Santa Bar- 
bara, Santa Barbara county, California. Coach Horses, 
Dralt Horses, I'rottiug Bred Horses and pure Uulstuiii- 
Friesim Cattle. Young cattle and matched teams 
always on hand. Francis T. Underbill, Proprietor. 
C. F. Swan, Manager. 



COTATE RANCH BREEDING FARM, Pages 
station, .S. F. & N. P. K,. K. P. C, Peon's Grove, 
Sonoma Co., Cal. Wilfred Page, Manager. Breeders 
of Short Horn Cattle, Knglisb Draft Horses, Spanish 
Merino Sheep and Berkshire Swine. 

P. S. CHli-iEd, Davisville, Yolo oo., importer and 
breeder of registered Shorthorns of the best families. 

SllNSON <S i^AttSd, Dayton, iNevaua. Regis- 
tered Shorthorns of choice breeding strains. 

T. P. A.^?iLLIAMS, Columbia, Boone Co., Mo., 
breeder and importer oi ihoroughbred Herefords^ 

LEONARD iictOS., Mt. Leonard, Mo., importers 
and breeders of Gilloway, Aberdoen-Angus and Short- 
horn cattle. 

HYDE^ islaSOO KB, Visalia, importers and breeders 
of shorthorn cattle. Young s tock for sale. 

j7 A. BREWER, Centerville, Alameda County, Cal. 
Shorthorns and Grades. Young stock for sale. 



SHEEP AND GOATS. 



L. U. SHIPPEE, Stockton, Cal., importer and breeder 
of Spanish Merino Sheep, Durham uattle. Jacks and 
Jennys .s BerKsbirc Swine; higli graded ranis for sale. 

R7H. CKANE, Petaluma, Cal., breeder and importer. 
South Down of Long John Wcntworth herd tor aaie. 

ETW. WoOLSBV <S son, Fulton, Sonoma Co., 
imp'rs i b'dera I'boroughlire d Merino. Jersey Cattle. 

EASToN OdiLLiS, LaKeville, Sonoma Co., thorough- 
bred Spanish Merino Sheep. Choice ram a for sale 

J. B. HOyi', Bird's Lamiing, Ca!., importer and 
breeder of Shropshire Sheep; also breeds cross-bred 
Merino and Shropshire Sneeo. Rams fo r sale. 

KlRKPATRlUli ar"WHtrrAK.BK, Knight's 
Kerry. Cal. . breeders of Merino Sheep. Rams for sale. 

TTcI. HAtCLaN, Williams, Colusa Co., breeder pure 
blooded Angora goats, A Merinos; young stock for sale . 



SWINE. 



'i'^LER BEaCU, San Jose, <;al., breeder of 

thorotnrhbred Berkabire and F.wi'x Houa. 



RBGISTEKED BERKSHIRES, BLACK 
JACtC, BESS and REDWOOD; imported 
strains; pairs and trios, not akin, at farmers' prices. 
YouiiL' boars, low. F. H. Biirkc, 401 Montgomery St. 8.F 



G«iO. BEMbJI^ r ai SON, R;dwood City. Ayrshire 
Cattle, Soiithdnwo Sheep, Berkshire ami Ks.sex Swine. 

WiLiLLAM NILES, Los Angeles, Cal. I'horoughDred 
PoUnH-flVilnft and R^rkqhlrn Pltra rHrmUrafro* 



JOHJN KiDEK, Saoramenio, Cal. Breeaer oi i'nor- 
oughbred Berkshire Swine. My stook oi Hogg are all 
vannrH^H In thf> Amflrlnan BwrWahlr** Ri»oorH 



W. D. RUOHER, Santa Clara, breeder of registered 
iinprove i Poland China Swinr. PiCT for sale. 



I. L. DiOKlNaON, Lone Oak Farm, Swnora, Tuol- 
umne Co., Cal., breeder of thoroughbred Essex Ho^s. 
Pigs DOW ready for sale. (Prices reasonable. 



IMPORTANT! 

That the public should know that for the past .Sixteen Years our Sole nusiness has been, and now is, 
importing (Over 100 Carloads) and breeding improved Live Stock— Horses, Jacks, Short Horns, Ayrshires, 
and Jerseys («r Alderneys) and their grades; also, all the varieties of breeding ■jliecp and Hogs. We can sup- 
ply any and all good animals that may be wanted, and at very reasonable prices and on convenient 
terms. Write or call on us. PETER SAXE and HOMER P. SA.XE. 

San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 22, 1886. FISTJiK SAXK & SON, tick House, S. F. 



HOLSTBIN-FRIBSIANS. 

STOP! THINK I INVESTIGATE 

The only Cow that has given 26,021 lbs. 2 ozs. of milk in a year. 
1'he only lour-year old that has given over 23,000 lbs. in a year. 
The only two-year-old that has given 18,484 lt.a. 13 oz<. in a year. 
The only herd of mature cows that has averaged 17,166 IIjs. 1 oz. In a year. 
'I'he only herd of two-y»ar olds that has averaged 12,409 lbs. 8 ozs. In a year. 
The only two-year-old that has made 16 tt.B. 9 07.8. ot butter in a week. 
The only her<l in which two-year-olds have averaged over 11 llis. each in a week. 
Twenty-three cows in this herd have averaged 18 lbs. 3 ozs. of butter in a week. 
Also a hue stud ot Clydesdale Stallions, Mares and fillies ot all ages. 
Send for Catalogue gi\ ing full recorda and pedigrees. In writing always mention Rural Pim.ss. 

SMITHS. POWELL St LAMB. Syracuse. New York. 



MARTIN KZ, 
CAL. 



} ALHAMBRA POULTRY YARDS { 




JASFKK J. JONK.S 
Proprietor. 

— BRRKDKR OF — 

HIGH-CLASS POULTRY, 

Clean sweep on Pljuioiith Rock Chicks at 
Great CalifDrnia I'oultrv ShowatSan Frandijco, 
Jan. 11th to 16th,lH86." 1 he Beat ia the Cheap- 
est. IlluHtrated Catalo^e aentfreeon applica- 
tion; worth to Any breeder of poultry. 
Send me your name on a Postal Card; 6000 
copies of fine llluatratad Cataloi^ue (or free 
diHtributioD. 



GOLDEN GATE INCUBATOR. 

**Soelnff in believing,** Parties who coiiteinijlate using incubators, or who have been unsucfesrfful in their use 
or in the rearing of chickens, should inspect our incul>ator and brooiling-huime. Tliis is the only satisfactory ehnuing in 
thirt perioil of lUstnLst of incubators-a distrust brought about. f«»r the nmst part, by cheap an<i inerticienl contrivances for 
the purpose. We have a long and strong list of recuinmeudatioiis, with the written testimony of people who have nia<le 
the largest averiige percentages you ever heard of; we have a large number of medals, diolumas and wbat-not from vuriuus 
Fairs; we have tlie finest-lodking machine you ever saw, with a magnificent record of more than four years' duration but 
we are quite willing you should discard all these wt^ighty evidences after once seeing the ilaily hatching of our machine and 
tlie hundreds of t)eautiful, strong and healthy birds, without vermin or blemish, now in our lirondiug-house. We show 
what we ean tlo. and you are cordially invited to know w hat tiiat iH. It is worth your while to witness the re- 
sults of our mure than six years' successful experience. Boats frotji San Krancisco every iialf hour; fare, 15 cents. Large 
circulars mailed free. U, U. INCtrUATOK <:0.. EaMt Oakland. Cal. 



Headquarters for all Varieties of FANCY CHICKENS, 

DUCKS, TURKEYS, GEESE, PEACOCKS, Etc. 

Publisher of "Nlles' Pacific Coast Poultry and Stock Book," 
a new book on subjeets connected with suceessful poultry and stock raising on 
the Pacific Coast. Price, 60 oents, poet-paid. Inclose stamp tor inloriuatiou. 
ALSO rrkkhkr of 

Jox'sov cfc Ho Is to in 0£tttlo, ftxxcL Hoss. 

AddresK. AVILI.I.\l>r NII-K,"*. Lo« .4iigele«. Cal. 





FRENCH DRAFT STALLIONS, 

Kentacky Jacks and Jennets, 
Work Horses and Mules 

FOR SALE. 

Some of the Stallions were imported from Europe, 
others from Illinois, and some young ones were bred in 
California from imported stock. The prices will be lees 
than animals of equal value can be purchased else- 
where. 

Call at or address Patterson's Ranch, Ilucneme, Ven- 
tura County, or Pattcrscm's Kanch, Grayson, Stanislaus 
County, or for further information call on or address 
JAH£S M. PATTEKSON, No. 8 Davis St., San Francisco. 

JOHN D. PATTERSON. 



LITTLES 



CHEMICAL 
FLUID 




SHEEP DIP. 

Price Reduced to 
$1.25 

PER GALLON. 



FOR SALE. 
HOLSTEIN-FRIESIAN CATTLE 

FROM TIIR IIRRD OP 

HON. LELAND STANFORD, 
On his Ranch at Vina, Tehama County, Cal. 
For prices and catalogue address 

MR. ARIEL LATHROP. 
Room 89, C. P. R. R. Building, 

Cor. 4th and Townsend Sts., 

San Franclfico, Oal. 



RED POLLED CATTLE. 

For Milk, Butter and Beef; of a beautiful red color; no 
horns for mischief; just the Cattle for the Farm, the 
Dairy and the Family. 

Imported, bred and for sale by 

L. P. ROSS, 
Send for Catalogrue. Iowa City. Iowa. 



BADEN FARM HERD 

Of Short Horn Cattle and Dairy Cows. 

Catalogues and Prices on apjilicatlon to 

ROBERT ASHBDRNBR, 
Baden Station, San Mateo Co., Gal. 



Twenty gallons of fluid 
mixed with cold water will 
make 1,200 gallons of Dip. 
It Is superior to all Dips and Dressings for Scab in 
Sheep; Is certain in effect; is easily mixed, and is applied 
in a cold state. Unlike sulphur or tobacco, or other 

riolsonous Dips, It Increases the growth of the wool, stim- 
ates the fleece, and greatly adds to the yolk. It destroys 
all vermin. It is efficacious for almost every disease (in- 
ternal and external) sheep are subject to. 

FALKNER. BELL & GO- 

San Francisco. Oal. 



Recommended by Professors Hiltn^rd, Cooke, etc. 

Powdered Potash & Caustic Soda 

KILLS GOPHKKS, INSECT.S, Etc. 

Makes a pure Soap at a cost of $1 pet 125 lbs. Send for 
direetiona to T. W. JACKSON & CO., 

804 California St., S. F. 




Calvert's Carbolic 

SHEEP WASH 

$S per Gallon. 

After dipping the Sheep, Is use- 
ful for preserving wet hides, de- 
stroying the vine pest, and for 
wheat dressings and disinfecting 
purposes, etc. T. W. JACKSON, 
S. F., Sole Agent for Pacific Coast 




Y01'l^ OWN 
ItiiMC, .llial, 
«ly»t<TSIu-llH, 
<;rahiiin Flour & Vojti. in (lie 



GRIND 



Veterinary Surgeon. 

Late Veterinary Inspector of Cattle for the State 
of Kentucky. 

Operative Surgery and Treatment of 
Chronic Lameness Specialties. 

DR. 8. B. SWIFT, - • San Jose, Cal. 



JJ W 1 (X) per cent, more nnule 
inkaenTnirPmiltrvT A1b« P<J\VEU iMII.I.S iind 
K*lf>T|-^Fl"»ni.I.!*.Circular»and testimonials 
int onlppi;ciaou WILSO.N UKOS. Easton. Pa. 

Thl8 paper Is printed with Ink Manufac- 
tured by Charles Bneu Johnson & Co., 5O0 
South 10th St., Philadelphia. Bianoh OfB- 
ces-47 Rose St., New York, and 40 La Salle 
St., Chicago- Agent for the Pacific Coast- 
Joseph H. Doroty. 628 Oommerolal St.. S.F. 




Are you using WelUnif- 
ton'sImprovedEgrs Food 
for Poultry? It not, wiit 
NOTt Every Grocer, Druggist 
and Merchant Sells this Egg 
Food. 



iNCUBi^TOI^S. 



THE PACIFIC INCUBATOR! 

Avarded the Gold Medal 
at the .state Fair. Sacra- 
ineuto. and at the Mechan- 
icH' Institute Fair of IiiH4 
IHHS and 188({.fverall com- 
petitors as the best machine 
made. It will hatch any kind of 
Eggs better than a lien. 

I'aeiiic Coast Agency for the 
celebrated Silver l'"ini«h Galvan- 
ized Wire Netting, The Wilson 
Hone and Shell Mill, and the 
.\iiierican Me.it Chopper. Poul- 
try appliances of every kind and 
' \ cry variety of Land and Water 
I wwi can be found at the Oak- 
5 I uiil Poultry Yards, the oldest 

:.ri<l largest establishment on the 
Pa' iliu (Juust. The Patitie Coast Poulterers' Hand Book 
and Uuide; price. 40 oents. Scad 2'Cent stamp for illus- 
trated eo page cauhigue to the PACIFIC INOU- 
BATOR CO.. 1317 Castro »t., Oakland, Oal 





The Halsted 
Incubator Co. 

i;il2 Myrtle St., 
< lakland, - - Cal. 

Price from $20 
up. Model Brooder 
fruu) $5 up. 

Tlioroughbred 
Poultry and Eggs. 
Send for new Cir- 
culars containing 
much valuable in- 
formation. 



IMPORTED BERKSHIRES. 




Redwood Duke, 13.368. 
Prize winners at all tlie Fairs in California, and entire 
list of sweepstake premiums at State Fair, 1S-S6. Impor- 
tations made direct from Knj;lana every year from the 
most noted breeders, selected from the best blood and 
most fashionable families of Disbfaced Herkshires, re- 
^jardless of cost, and all recorded iu KniLrlisii and Ameri- 
can licrkshire records. YounK^ plifi^ from these importa- 
tions, male and female, from different families, for sale 
at reasonable prices, and every pi^; guaranteed. Address, 
AN UKEW SMITH, Redwood City, or 21S California St., 
San Francisco. 



"Walnut Grove" 



5SSSSWP0LAND-CHINA HERD 

My herd ionai«ts of the best strains that (■an be found. 
.Stock all recorded in A. P. C. U. I have a flue lot of 
spring, summer and fall pigs, also a few choice yearling 
sows, for sale. Prices to suit the times. 

J. MBLVIN, Davisville. Cal. 



SEDGWICK STEEL WIRE FENCE. 




The best Farm, Garden, Poultry Yard, Lawn, 
School Lot, Park and Cemetery Fences and Gales. 
Perfect Automatic Gale. Cheapest and Neatest 
Iron Fences. Iron and wire Summer Houses, Lawn 
Furniture, and other wire work. Pest Wire Siretch- 
er and Pllcr. Abk dealers in hardware, or address, 

SEDGWICK BROS., Richmond, Ind. 



OThc BUVKRS' GUIDK li 
Issued Sept. aud March, 
eavn year. Oli- 3VZ pa^rs, 
Sl^i-lVi lnche»,»ltliover 
3,600' Illustrations — a 
whole Picture Gallery. 
GIVES Wholesale Prices 
direct to conxuniirf on all ^oods for 
personal or family use. Tills how to 
order, and gives exact cost of every- 
thing you use, cat, drink, wear, or 
have fun with. These IKVAI.IIAHLB 
HOOKS contain information Rlcanrd 
from the markets of the world. W.e 
win maU a copy FRKE to any ad- 
dress npon receipt of 10 cts. to defray 
expense of mailing. Let us hear from 
yon. Respectfully, 

MONTGOMERY WARD & CO 

SiST i& 'i'iXi Wabash Avenue, Chicago, ll> 



IN*' itlAt'lll^KKV. Our Ar. 
tfolnn W«-ll Kn<-.vrlop,-,lla cou- 
taiuK near 7K) euKraviugs, illuntratinK 
aud (lescribiiig all the practical ttjola 
aud aiipiiunces used in the art of well 
siukiug; diamoud prospecting ma- 
chinery, windmills, ar- 
tesian engines, )>uuiiis, 
etc. Kdltcd by the 
"American Well 
Works, ' the largest 
manufacturers in the 
world of this class of 
machiner>'. We will 
si'ud this iKKjk to any 
liartv ou reeeil.t uf 2=i cents for mailing. Kiprrt well drill- 
ers and agents wunted. Addreas. The American 
Well Works. Aurora. III*.. V. N. A. 

10 L<ively Hidden Name Cards, with name covered by 
^ hands holding flowers, etc., Imi'ortsd kroii Gkr- 
MANY, for 15 cts. 12 extra line <;old Bevel Edge Cards, 
with name, 15 cts. Agents' Outttt sent free with each 
order from this ad. provided you cut out and retuni noe 
the ad and agree to act as my agent. Q. W. TUTTLK, 
Pasadena, Cal. 




Jan. 8, 1887] 



pAClFie R.URAL> PRESS 



35 



Coin[i)i^3io|i flerctiapt?. 

WM. T. COLEMAN & CO., 

Shipping and Commission 

MERCHANTS, 
San Francisco and New York. 



Receive consignments of Produce for sale in San Fran- 
cisco, New yorli, Boston, Philadelphia, England, Aus- 
tralia, etc. Make advances on approved consignments. 
Fill orders for staple goods in New York and other mar- 
kets. Effect fire and marine insurance in best offices. 
Charter vessels and engage freights for all trades. Agents 
for line clipper ships from Philadelphia, China, etc. All 
business has faithful and watchful attention. 



THE GIANT POWDER COMPANY. 



EI TtOL O V ^ Ij, 



DALTON BROS.. 

Commission Mercliants 

ADD DBAL8R8 IM 

OALIFORNIA AND OREGON PRODUCE. 

GREEN AND DRIED FRUITS, 

Qrain, Wool, Hides, Beam, and Potatoes. 

808 and 810 DAVIS ST., 

p. 0. Box 1980. SAN FRANCISCO 

CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. 



MOORE. FERGUSON & CO.. 

WOOL, GRAIN, FLOUR 

— AND— 

General Commission Mercliants, 

310 California St., S. P. 

Members of the San Francisco Produce Exchange. 

rtS"Personal attention given to Sales and Liberal Ad- 
vances made on Consignments at low rates of interest. 



Qeo. Morrow. lEstablisbed 1854.] Geo. F. Morrow. 

GEORGE MORROW & CO., 

HAY and GRAIN 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

se Olay Street and 28 Commercial Street, 

San Franoisoo, Cal. 
tr SHIPPING ORDERS A SPECIALTY. 



O. L. BENTON & CO., 

Commission Merchants, 

Wholcsalu and Retail Dealers in 
Poultry and Wild Game, 65, 66,67 California 
Marliet. S. F. l^All orders attended to at the 
shortest notice. Goods delivered Free of Charge to 
any part of the city. 



.1. W. WOLF. 



RAU'H BROWN. 



W. H. WOLF. 



WOLF, BROWN & CO., 

General Commission Merchants 

And dealers in Caliloniia anil Oregon Produce, 
321 Davis Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



WETMORE BROTHERS, 

Commission Merchants, 

Green and Dried Fruit, Produce, Eggs, Etc. 
Consignments Solicited. 524 & 526 Sansome St.. S. F. 



P. STEIN HAGEN & CO., 
Fruit and General Commission Merchants 

BRICK 8X0R88 : 

408 & 410 Davis St., San Francisco. 



WITTLAND & FREDRICKSON, 

Commission Merchants, 

AU Kinds of Green and Dried Fruits. 
coNsisNMRNTS SOLICITED. 324 Davls St., S. F. 



EVELETH & NASH, 

Commission Merchants, 

422 Front St., and 221, 223, 225 and 227 Washington St. 
Consignors receive the benefit of our large shipping trade. 



CPENCERIAN 

OTEEly PENS 

AKe The. Best i 



Established 1860. 

USED BY THE BEST PENMEN 

Noted for Bnpcrtnrlty of Metal, 

ITntrornilty, and DlirabliltT. 
JO Samples for trial, post-paid, lo Cents. 

IVISON, BLAKE^ AN, TAYI OR. & CO., 

753 and 755 Bro.idway, New York. 



MISSION ROCK DOCK 

AND 

gra:n warehouse, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

1^ nnn tons capacity, nnn 

I Kjf\J\J\J Storage at Lowest Rates. ' «-',VJW«..» 

CHAS. H. SINCLAIR. Supt. 
Oal. Dry DocklCo., props. OfBce, S18(Cal St. room 8. 



PATENT OWNERS OF 



JUDSON POWDER. 

The Only Reliable and Efficient Powder 

For Stump and Bmk Blasting. From 5 to 20 
pouDcls blows any Stump, Tree or Root clear 
out of ground at less cost than grubbing. 
Railroaders and Farmers use no other. 

As other makers IMITATE our Giant Powder, so do they Judson, by Manufacturing 
a second-grade, inferior to Judson. 
BANDMANN, NIELSEN & CO, General Agents, San Francisco. 



NOBEL'S DYNAMITE, 

NOBEL'S EXPLOSIVE GELATINE, 

NOBEL'S GELATINE-DYNAMITE, 

Best aM Strongest Explosi?es iii tlie Worlil. 



GRANGERS' BUSINESS ASSOCIATION. 

SHIPPING ^COMMISSION HOUSE. 



OFFICE, 108 DAVIS STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Warehouse and Wharf at Port Costa. 



CONSIGNMENTS OF GRAIN, WOOL. AND ALL KINDS OF PRODUCE SOLICITED. 

Money advanced on Grain In Store at lowest possible rates of Interest 
Full Cargoes of Wheat furnished Shippers at short notice. 

ALSO ORDERS FOR GRAIN BAGS, Agricultural Implements, Wagons, Groceries 
and Merchandise of every description solicited. 

B. VAN EVERY. Manager. A. M. BELT, Assistant Manager. 



McLEAN S ORCHARD & FIELD 



Awarded First Premium 



CULTIVATOR. 

THE FAVORITE. 



At the State Fairs of 1884, 18S5, 
and 1886; aluo numerous 
County Fairs. 



tfPot further particulars inquire 
of 



N. McLEAN, 
WatsonvlUe, 

Santa Cruz Co., 
California. 





GOULD'S 

SPRAY PUMP. 



Sji^ This Pump we have gotten up expressly for spraying 
vines, fruit trees, etc., infested with destructive insects. 
'Vv3 It has been adopted and recommended hv the Stare Horti- 
" cultural Society, The worl^ini; parts are constructed en- 
■it^'i tirelv of Brass, and will not h^i affected by the corrosive 
!{ > solutions use.l. The BAMBOO KXTKNSION is an ad- 
mirable invention. Tho operator, by tiie use of this ex- 
trusion, can get to all parts of the tree while on the 
L'round; also saving himself from getting burnt witli the 
solution. The improved nozzle will save the price of itself 
within a day. It throws a very tine mist. We have also 
an attachment for Pump to stir up the litjuid in barrel be- 
fore putting on the solution, thus keeping the liquid always 
in condition to be laid on evenly, and not allowing the 
preparation to settle at the bottom. Send for special Cata- 
logue, 

We are prepared to fit these Pumps complete with Hose, 
Bamboo Extensions, Barrel, all ready to commence spray- 
ing with. Write for prices. 

WOODIN & LITTLE, 
509 & 511 Market St., San Francisco. 




S. W. Corner Kearny and Montgomery Avenue, San Francisco. 
rFree Ooacb to and fJ-om the HoaBe. J. W. BEOKJSR, Proprietor, 



H. P. GREGORY & CO. 

SOLE AGENTS FOR 

WEBBER'S CELEBRATED 




IRRIGATING 



□PTT3VtI»S. 



We also carry ik btock th? Largest Link of 

MACHINERY 

In the UNITED STATES, 

Consisting of Wood and Iron Working 
Machinery. Pumps of every 
description. 

ENGINES AND BOILERS 



A SPECIALTY. 



HORTON & KENNEDY'S 

FAMOUS 

ENTERPRISE 

Self-Regulatlng 

yVINDMILL 

Is reeognlzed as 
TBB Best. 

Always gives satlsfaotlon. SlUPLEi 
STRONG and DURABLE In all parts. 
Solid Wrought-iron Crank Shaft with 
oonBLB BEARiNQS for the Crank to 
work in, all turned and run in adjust- 
able babbitted boxes. 

Positively Self-Regulating. 

with no oo Bprlngs, or springs o any kind. No little 
rods, joints, levers, or anything of the kind to gel out of 
order, as such things do. Mills in use 8 to 12 years in 
good order now, that have never cost one cent for repairs. 
All genuine Enterprise Mills for the Pacifle Coast trade 
come only through this agency, and none, whether of 
the old or latest pattern, are genuine except those bear- 
ing the "Enterprise Co." stamp. Look out for this, aa 
inferior mills are being offered with testimonials applied 
to them which were given for ours. Prices to suit th 
times. Full particulars free. Best Pumps, Feed Uillg, 
etc., kept in stock. Address, 

HORTON & KENNEDY. 

'JENBRAL OFFICE AND SUPPLIES (as always before 
LIVERMORE, ALAMEDA CO., CAL. 

San Francisco Agency-JAMBS LINFOBTH 
120 Front St.. San Francisco. 





1,300 Engines now in use. 
40,000 Horse Power now running. 
Sales 2,000 H. P. per month. 

iV'Send tor Illustrated Circular and Reference List. 

PARKE & LACY, 

Sole Agents for Pacific Coast & Territories 
21 and 23 Fremont St. San Francisco. 



IVIAIN & WINCHESTER, 

214, 216, 218. 220 BATTERY STREET 

SAN PBANOISCO. 

DOUBLE AND SINGLE HARNESS 

Of Every Description, 

Saddles, Whips, Robes and Riding and 
Stable Equipments of every K'nd. 

IVSMD for iLLUgTKATID CaTALOOUB. 



36 



PACIFie f^URAb f RESS. 



[Jan. 8, 1887 



♦ B» fliAI^KET j!{,EfOF^T 

Note.— Our quotations are for ^Tednesday, not Satur- 
day, thu date the paper bears. 



\Yeekly Market Review. 

DOMESTIC PBODUOB, ETC. 

San Francisco, Jan. 5, 1887. 
The past week was interrupted by the usual holi 
day festivities, but now that they have passed more 
active trading is looked for. Notwithstanding the 
holidays, wheat, barley and oats advanced i 
der liberal buying. The English wheat markets 
ruled very strong, with a strong closing to-day, as 
follows: 

London, January 5 — WHEAT— Dull and irreg 
uhr. California spot lots, 7s 7d to 7s tod; off coast, 
38s; just shipped, 40s; nearly due, 38s 6d; caigoes 
on passage quiet but steady; English country mar- 
kets, gem-rally dearer; !■ rench, firm; Wheat and 
flour in Pans. firm. 

Eastern Wool Markets. 

New York, Jan. 1. — The markets here and 
Boston and Philadelphia are slightly active for the 
closing week of the year. In this market there 
nothing new to report, while the general tone of 
business is fairly prosperous. Wools and woolen 
goods continue dull. In fl )Ston, California wool is 
very qui^t, and is either held out ol market or is sell- 
ing without a profit. Territory wool is still in heavy 
stock and more or less pressed for sale, and the mar- 
ket IS emphatically in buyers' favor, though quota- 
tions are no better nor lower than last week. In 
Philadelphia, stocks of all descriptions are light and 
low, and medium wool is generally held with con- 
fidence in anticipation of an improving trade. Fine 
fleeces and territory wools are regarded with less 
confidence than other descriptions, and on these the 
ma I ket inclines in buyers' lavor, but there is no 
quotable change from last week's orices. Among 
ihe sales were: 10,000 pounds East Oregon, at i6(&j 
17c; 25,000 pounds Eist Oregon, at 21(0^240; 60.000 
pauiids territory, ati6@2ic; 20,000 pounds territory, 
at 22%c; 120,000 pounds territory, at 2i@24c; 25,- 
001 pounds medium, at 25c; 75,000 pounds Wyo- 
ming and Utah, at igiw^jc. 

Boston, Jan. 3. — The Boston Post of the ist inst. 
says: The demand for domestic wool the past week 
has been quite good and the sales amounted to 2,- 
158,500 pounds. The market continues firm, and 
prices remain about the same. Holders are confi- 
dent that present prices will be sustained and that 
manufacturers will become free buyers in a short 
time. I'he interior markets are well cleared of wool, 
and foreign markets continue firm and are still con- 
siderably above the importing point, in Australian 
wools there have been sales of 75,500 pounds, at 34 
and 39c. The other sales of foreign have been 30,- 
000 pounds Montevideo, 363,000 pounds Mediterra- 
nean carpet, 15.000 pounds East Indian carpet, and 
40,000 pounds sundries, on private terms. For Call- 
lornia wool, the market is very quiet, and o.ily 75,- 

000 pounds have been reported, on private terms. 

Foreign Review. 

London, Jan. 3. — The Mark Lane Express, in its 
review ol the British grain trade during the past 
week, says the markets are sparingly supplied. En- 
glish wheat is 2S higher than belore the holidays. 

1 he flour trade has a decided upward tendency — 
prices being from 6d to is higher. Ihe sale of En- 
glish wheat during tne week looted up 34.766 quar- 
ters, at 35s, against 30,245 quarters at 30s during 
the corresponding period of last year. The 
general values are about is better. Two car- 
goes of wheat have arrived; one remained. At 
to-day's market, English wheal was strong. During 
the past fortnight the advance has ranged from is 
6d to 2S. Flour was firm; the fortnight's rise was is 
6d. Corn was slightly cheaper. Baans and peas 
were unchanged. 

New York 'Wbeat Market. 
New York, Jan. i. — The wheat market was quiet, 
but steady, down to Thursday's opening, when it 
became more active, and prices advanced on stronger 
European market reporis and warlike rumors. Ex- 
porters were buyers for early shipments. The mar- 
ket on Friday ruled active, closing steady; spot, 
2S^@2?4c higher; options, January, 93!<c; Febru- 
ary, 94?iic; March, 96MC; May, 98XC. 

New York Hop Market 

New York, Jan. i. — The market has developed 
no change. Coast crop, 1886, prime to choice, 25® 
27c; fair to good, 22(^240; 1885, good to choice, 
io^i3C. 

Eastern Dried Fruit Market. 

Chicago. Jan. i. — .\ steady and firm feeling pre- 
vails in the dried fruit market nere. I he market at 
the same time rules rather quiet, arrivals are still 
light and offerings limited. Jobbers and dealers 
are busy, taking slock, ana are not looking 
around much. California dried fruits — kaisins 
are easy, but other kinds are steady and 
firm, and the demand is fair. Prunes, French, per 
lb, 9c; plums, pitted, I3@i4c; peaches, quarters, 
i2@i3c; halves, pared, 25c; neciarlnes, 9c; pears, 
8((4i2>^c; raisins, London Layers, 20-lb boxes, 
per box, $1.75®!. 80; rais.ns, loose Muscatel, 
per box, $r.5o(i;t.6o. 

Nf.w York, Jan. 1. — Raisins — The movement is 
moderate, confined principally to better grades, 
which, being in limited supply, are held steady. 
Two-crown loose Muscatel, $1.40®!. 45; London 
Layers, $i.95@2; California two-crown, $i.6o@i. 65; 
three-crown, Ji.85@i.9o; London Layers, $1.95^ 
2.20. Piunes— Turkisn in limited request, at 5c. 
French, firm, at 7%@3c for 6o's@9o's. Currants 
in moderate demand, at 5 J^@5J^c. Citron, 17^® 
17KC. 

California Products in New York. 

New Yokk, Jan. i. — California Lima beans are 
quiet, at $1.80^1.85. 

Local Markets. 

BAGS — The market holds to strong prices for 
Calcuttas, with fair trading lor futures, which would 
be largely increased with heavy rains soon. 

BARLEY — The market held to strong prices 
throughout the week, owing 10 stronger holding and 



a good demand. On Tuesday, prices weakened off, 
but closed higher to-day. On Call, transactions were 
large and higher figures, 'i he following are to-day's 
sales on Call: ^iorning Session: Buyer season — 
500 tons, $1.15 K; 1000, $1. 16; 100, $i.i6)<; 100, 
$i.i6>^; 200, $i.i6M; 200, $i.i6f^; 800, >i.i6)i 
900, $1.17; 400, $i.i7'A; 500, $i.i7J^. Seller .sea- 
son — 400 tons, $i.o8>^ ; 100, J 1.08^ ; 200, $i.o8K; 
100, $1.09; 100, May, 100 tons, $1.11 ^ 

ctl. Afternoon Session: Buyer season— 1100 tons 
$1.17; 400, $i.i6K; 900, fi.i6j^; 400, $i.i6}i. 
No. I Brewing, buyer season — 300 tons, $1.28 ^ 
ctl. 

BUTTER— The market is soft, with only gilt- 
edged wanted. The market is overstocked with 
fresh made from new pasturage. 

CHEESE— The market is very strong, with an 
advance obtainable. 

EGGS — The market is weak at 30 cts top for gilt- 
edged or strictly choice fresh ranch. The demand 
is increasing, but so are receipts. 

FLOUR— The market is exceedingly strong, with 
an advance asked and obtained for the more choice 
biands. Local dealers are more disposed to stock 
up, owing to the higher advancing macket for wheat. 
The exports, last year, aggregate 1,124.615 bbls. 
against 1,295,657 bbis in 1885. Of the exports last 
year, C hina look 421,698 bbls, and Great Britain, 
469,385 bbls. 

WHEAT — The market continued to advance up 
to Monday, when it weikened off, but rallied again 
to-day, closing very strong, with $1.60 bid for No. i 
shipping season, storage paid at Port Costa. Call 
transactions have been large throughout the week. 
1 he following are to-day's sales: Morning Session: 
Spot, season's storage paid — 500 tons, $1.60. Buy- 
er season — 700 tons, $1.67%; 900, $1.68; 100, 
$i.68J'8; 1600, $i.68K; 200, $1.68^; 800, $i.68M; 
900, $i.68H; 400, $i.68Ji; 100, $1.68?^; 2700, 
$1.69. Seller 1887 — 200 tons, $1.55 ^ ctl. After- 
noon Session: Buyer season — 6100 tons, $1.69; 1900, 
$1.69^-8; 5400, $1.69;^; 300, $i.69>s; 1600, $1.69}^. 
Buyer 1887 — 100 tons, $1.75 ctl. 

[COMMUNICATED.) 

Market Information. 

Cereals. 

Although the wheat market closed the year 1886 
very strong, yet the new year opened on a higher 
and excited market. 1 he causes which have led to 
the high market this paper has set forth in previous 
issues, and pointed out the certainty of very high 
prices ruling belore the close of the season. Tliis 
position was taken in July last, and maintained ever 
since , notwithstanding ihe daily press, without an 
exception, seemingly worked in exporters' favor by 
bearing the market so as to have farmers sell at low 
prices. I he exports of wheat last year from this 
port aggregated 15,832,155 ctls against 11,727,895 
1885. 1 he stock ol wheat in the warehouses in 
this city ana Port Costa, on January 1, was 87,438 
short Ions. It is claimed by well-infoimed parties that 
the stock carried by interior warehouses is very con- 
siderably short of the quantity carried on January i, 
i836, but this cannot be verified uniil the Produ ce 
Exchange's account ol stock in the Sute is made 
public. In the absence of this official statement, the 
lollowing IS given in short tons: 

Wheat on hand July i, 1886 75.000 

Total 1886 wheal crop 1.100,000 

Probable receipts from Oregon 35.ouo 



Total 1,210,000 

Local wants and seed to Decemb r 

31, 1886 200,000 

Total exports, everywhere, to De- 
cember 31, 1886 540,000 



740,000 



On hand January i, 1887 

Local wants, January i to July i, 

1887 150,000 

Probable export, January i to July 

I, 1887 300,000 



470,000 



450,000 



On hand July i, 1887 20,000 

With a 20,000 tons carryover, one and all 
must concede that high prices will obtain from now 
on, even if the foreign market does not advance; but 
all present advices point to still higher values abroad. 

In last week's issue we stated that higher prices 
for barley were inevitable, which was lully verified 
by a sharp advance on Monday, with a strong 
market ruling. The dry weather and lighter stocks 
in the State than heretofore claimed caused the 
short interest to commence filling. I'he overland 
exports last year aggregate 249,838 ctls, against 92,- 
760 ctls in 1885, and by sea, 723 648 ctls, against 
185.297 ctls in 1885. The principal increase was to 
Great Britain and New York, 'l o the former coun- 
try they aggregate 391, 151 ctls against 8103 ctls in 
"5, and 10 New 'York, 187,005 ctls against 76,287 
cils in 1885. 

Oats have made quite an advance the past week, 
with a strong closing. The improvement is due to 
lighter receipts, light stocks and a good demand. 
The bulk of the oats are inferior, which still further 
enhances the value of the more choice. 

Choice corn continues firm, with a good demand 
ruling, but poorer grades are slow and in buyers' 
favor. 

Rye and buckwheat are steady under a light slock. 
The demand is fair. 

Feedstuffs. 

The demand for bran and middlings is good for 
the season, but the supply is fully up to the con- 
sumption. Some millers are disposed to advance 
their prices. 

Ground barley is very strong at a slight advance 
in sympathy with the higher price of barley. The 
demand, at the advance, is slow. 

Feed carrots are without essential change. 

Dealers continue to talk down hay, but the dry 
weather keeps holders firm, which forces buyers to 
pay well up to secure a choice quality owing to its 
relative scarcity. The market is quotable as follows: 
Alfalfa, $9.50@I2; barley, $8@(i; oats, $8@ii; 
cow hay, $8(^11.50; wheal, $10^13 # ton. 

Fruits. 

Oranges, under lighter receipts, show more 
strength, but buyers are not disposed to bid up only 
to meet immediate wants, fearing heavy receipts. 



PAOIPIO COAST WEATHER FOR THE WEEK. 

[F irnlahed tor publication In thto paper by Nblson Qorom, Sergeant Signal Service Corps. V. 8. 



DATB. 

Dec 30-Jan 6. 



Thursday.... 

Friday 

Saturday. . . . 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday.. 
Total I1.88 



Portland. | Red Bluff. 



4 



Sacramento 



S.Francisco 



IS .... 



Loa Angeles 



dan Diego 



06 



KxPLAiJ-tTioN.— CI. for clear; Cy , cloudy; Fr, lair; foggy; — iodicatos too small to measure. Temperature 
Wind and weather at 12:00 H. IPacifio Standard time), with amount of rainfall in the preceding 24 hours. 



Shipments to the north are increasing, but for that 
trade only the very best good keepers are wan;ed. 

Limes and lemons continue in excess of the de- 
mand, causing a low, unsatisfactory market 

Our market continues to be liberally supplied with 
Eastern apoles, which keeps prices tor California and 
Oregon oown. 1 he demand is good, with a firm, 
strong lone for the more choice. 

Dried fruits are firm, with the stock well in hand. 
Receipts are only fair, with the supply lo draw from 
reported light. Eastern advices report a strong, 
active market for all kinds. 

Raisins are slower, but the tone to the market is 
firm for the more choice packed, but those not lully 
up to the standard are slow, with concessions neces- 
sary 10 effect sales. 

.Live-Stock. 

The selling pressure, noted last week, is continued 
this week in beef cattle, due, so report says, chiefly 
to the dry weather. Mutton sheep are steady, but 
hogs are easy. The demand for all kinds is only 
moderate. In horses there is no change, with a light 
demand; m:lch cows are slow. 

BEEF — Extra, 7@7j^c; first grade, grass fed, 6'A 
@7C per lb; second grade, 5H(S*6c; third grade, 5@ 

-c 

MUTTO.N'— Ewes, 5® — c; wethers, 5^® — c. 

LAMB — Spring, 6@7c. Yearlings, — c. 

■VEAI^ — Large, 7®8c; small, 9^ to loc. 

PORK — Live hogs, 2',4 to 3c lor heavy and me- 
dium; hard dressed, 4 to 6c per lb; light, 2J^ to 3c; 
dressed, 3M lo soil hogs, live, to 2'/ic. 

On foot, one-third less for grain or stall fed, and 
one-half less for stock running out. 

'Vegetables. 

Potatoes are strong at an advance. The better 
market is due to light receipts and a good demand. 
Choice of all varieties continue, which causes buyers 
to bid up on top quotations lo have their wants met. 
Sweet potatoes are in light supply. 

Choice, hard, good-keeping onions are in light 
supply, with further advances not at all improbable 
at an early day. Onions of off quality and also cut 
onions favor buyers. 

Cabbages and root vegetables are steady, as are 
mushrooms, marrowfat, squash and dried peppers. 

Miscellaneous. 

The tonnage movement compares with last year at 
this date as follows: 



1886. 

On the way 207,785 

In port, disengaged 70,011 

In port, engaged 50.7'° 



1885. 
iS2-.^65 
129,950 

41,062 



Totals 328,506 323,377 

The above gives a eirrying capacity, as follows: 
1886, 525,609 short tons; 1885, 513,475 short tons; 
increa'je over last year, 11,134. 

The demand for grass seed is slower, with prices 
favoring buyers. 

Beans are steady, with a strong tone for the more 
choice under a fair demand for the East. 

Honey continues in light stock, which causes deal- 
ers to look for still higher prices. 

Wild game is unchanged, with the demand for 
ducks and geese slower. 

In poultry there is no essential change lo note; 
choice are wanted, and for which full prices are paid, 
but poor to lair are slow and easy. 

San Franciseo, Jan. j, 1887. 



Fruits and Vegetables. 



Extra choice iu good packages fetch an advance on top 
qudiatiouK, wli'le very poor grades sell less thau the lower 
iiuotatious. WitDNK»*DA« Jau. 5. ltto7. 

a.i>i*ie8, Dxconi.. 25 @ 1 00 Raspberries cb.. — — 

do choice 1 25 @ 1 75 StrawberrieB ch. 5 00 (tf 6 00 

BananaB, bunch. 1 50 @ 3 00 i WateruielouslOO — @ 
Bi^ickberries.ch. — @ - I DRIED FRUIT. 

CHiitt-louptrs. cr. — @ — ; Apples, sliced, jb 5 



CherritJb blk — <^ — 

doKuyalAun.. — ® — 
Cherry plums... (cC — 

Orabapples 1 25 1 75 

Crauberrtes 10 uO cal2 &u 

Currants chest ... — 

Fi|{B, bx ~ @ ~ 

Grapes 1 00 @ 2 00 



do oTaporated. 11 _ 

lo quartered .. 4 (j| 

^pricotB 2J 

do evaporated 20 @ 

Slaokbernes.... 'i m 

— JItron 18 64 



- @ - 



— W — 

— @ 1 00 



do Rose Peru. 

do Muflcat. ... 

do Tokays.... 

Isabel 

Wine, Zinfaudel 

do Mi.,sion.... — (g* — 
Limes, Mex 4 50 6 — 

do Cal. box . . . 50 @ 1 00 
Lemons, Cal.,bx 1 00 

do Sicily, box. 2 00 

do AustiiUlaii. — 



t>atefl. . 

91gB, pressed.... 

ntcB, loose 

Xectarlnes.. 
do evaporated 

Peaches 

do pared..... 
Peare, aUoed. . . . 

do qrtd 

do evaporated 

1 50 Tlumii, pittetl .. 

2 50 do UDpitted. . . 
Prunes. 



Nectarines box. — @ — do Freoch 8 i 

Uraogee, Com bx 1 25 @ 1 75 |Zuite Currants. » < 

doCho-cu 2 OU @ 2 5C I RAISINS. 

do Novels 2 50 4 50 'DehesaCliis, fey 2 65 ( 

— jlmperial Cabin- 



do Fanama, 
Peaches, bx — % 

do bask ~ ^ 

Orawforda, bx — @ 
do bskt. . — @ 

do choice — @ 

Pears bx 75 (a 

do choice 2 00 @ 

do Bartlett, bx @ 
Pe r H 1 m in o n B, 

Jap, bx 1 00 @ 

Pineapples, doz. 4 00 @ 
Pomegranates, b — @ 

Plums tti — W 

Fnioes bx — @ 

do Kgg — (a 

Quinces bx — @ 



et. fan.y.... 1 90 (g — 
Crown London 

Layers, fey.. 1 70 @ — 
do Loose Mus- 

Ciitels. fancy 1 GO @ — 
do Looee Mus- 
catels 1 50 @ — 

Cal. Valencias. . 1 50 ^ — 

do Layers 1 50 @ — 

do Sviltanas... 1 50 @ — 
KractioDS come 2.'>, 50 and 75 

— ceuts higher for halvuH, Quar- 

— iters aua eighths. 

— VUuETABLES. 

— Artichokes, doz. — @ — 

— 'Asparagus box.. — @ — 



Beets, sk 1 CO 

Cabbage, 100 lbs. 50 

Oarrots, sk 

Cauliflower, doz. 

Eggplant, bx 

Garlic, lb new. . 
Green Com, 
small 1k)x. .. 
do large box . . 
Green Peas, Ih. . 
Lettuce, doz . . . 
Lima liL'iins It... 
Musnruums, bx. 



25 ( 



10 I 



— do cultivated. — @ - 
75 Okra, dry, tt>... 10 « 12J 
35 dogretn l>ox.. — (d — 

— Parsulps, ctl 1 50 a — 

— Peppers, dry lb.. 10 @ — 

— do rreen, In.. 40 O 60 
|Purapkias prtonl2 (X) (915 UO 

— I ouuash, Harrow 

— I fat, too 7 00 ai2 00 

— do .Summer 25 @ 40 

— String Ijeaun lt>. . — @ 

-- Tomatoes box. . — @ — 

— TurDlD« ctl 7S M I UO 



Domestle Frodaoe. 



Extra choice in good packages fetch an advance on top 
quotatiouB. while very inior gradcR sell less than the lower 
iiuutatiuui). iViCDNEsiiAy, Jan. 5. ioo7 

i>ii,iiiNd AND PEAB. (-Peanut. . 



Bayo, ctl.... 

Butter 

Pea 

Red 

Pink 

Large White. 
Bmall White... 



1 40 >d 1 55 PUberta.. ...... 10 « 11 

1 25 @ 1 55 POTATOKH. 

1 60 a 1 7j Burbaak 1 20 @ 1 60 

1 25 S 1 40 I Early Roue 75 M 1 10 

) 25 (g 1 40 OutfeyCove 1 10 ® 1 35 

1 00 ® - IJersey Bluea... 1 iO @ 1 40 
1 6U @ 1 70 Petaluma. 



Uma 2 00 @ 2 45 Tomalee 1 00 i 



FldPeaa.blkeye 1 UO @ 1 05 River reds, 
do green 1 UO (pt 1 121 Humboldt . 



70 I 



! 1 35 
1 00 



75 
75 

@ 41 

® 7 
BTO. 

25 
30 
18 
18 



do Nilee 1 25 (* 

BROOM COUM. 
Southern per tun 60 @b 
Northern pt^r tun 50 @ 

cmtJoBV. 

Calif oraia. 4 ® 

German 61® 

DAIBY PRODUC 

BUTTKB. 

Oal.freehroU, lb. 20 @ 

do Fanoy br'nd. 27i(S 

Pickle roU IG 

Firkin, new 15 @ 

Eaatem — @ — 

OHEUB 

OheeM.Cal., lb.. 12iS 15 
Eastern style... 15 (g 16 

lUOB. 

Oal., ranch, doz.. 32} J; 35 

do. store 25 @ 30 

Ducks ~~ 

Oregon ~s ~ 

Eastern ~ @ 

Ut»h — @ — 

VEEO. 

Bran, ton 15 .SO @16 50 

Oommeal 2ii UO ©27 UO 

(;r'd Barley ton. 24 00 @25 00 

Hay S 00 @14 Uu 

MlddUngs lii .W (si22 00 

Oil Cake Heal. 2ii 50 i^2ti 5U 

Straw, bale 35 @ 50 

FLOUR. 

Extra, City MUls 4 52S(? 4 90 

do Co'ntry Mills 4 35 @ 4 771 Cal. SmokedBeef 
Supertlue 3 35 (g 3 i<U Hams, Cal 



1 15 I 
1 .0 I 



ip 



1 40 

1 50 



do Kidney... 

Chile 

do Oregon,. 

Peerless 

Salt Lake 

Sweet 

POULTRY AND GAME 

Hens, doz 6 00 7 50 

Roosters 6 tu @ 7 50 

Broilers 4 00 @ i5 00 

Ducks, tame.... 4 uO @ 6 UO 
do Mallard.... 2 00 S 3 50 

do Sprig 1 00 ^ 1 60 

Oeese. pair 1 00 ^ 3 00 

do Goslings ... — @ — 
WUdGray.doi 3 00 Id - 

Turkeys, lb 13 @ IS 

do Dreued.. 14 a 16 
TurkeyFeathen, 
tail and wing.. 
Snipe, Eng., doz. 
do Oominon.. — 

Doves 75 @ 

Quail 90 a 

tvaobita 1 00 a 

Hare ' ^ # 

Venison 8 a 

PROVISIONS. 
Oal. Bacon, 

Heavy, lb 

Medium 84@ 

Light lOil 

Extra Light.. US 
Lard. 



10 I 



GRAIN, KTO. 
Bailey, teed, ctl. 1 02^^ 1 12i 
do Brewing.. 1 10 

Chevalier 1 45 

do Coast... 90 

Buckwheat 1 00 

Com, White — .. 

Yellow 1 C5 a 1 10 

Small Round. 1 10 @ 1 15 

Nebraska 971(3 1 05 

Oats, new — @ — 

Choice feed I 55 g 1 65 

do good 1 40 @ 1 60 

do fair 1 30 (» 1 37i 

do black 1 40 O 1 56 

. do Oregon 1 30 @ 1 60 

Bye 1 10 @ 1 25 

Wheat milling. 

Gilt edged.. 1 65 O 1 671 

do ■ ■noioe 1 60 — 

d^ fair to good 1 55 i.< — 
Shipping choice I bim 1 60 

UO good 1 iisjii* 1 66i 

do lair 1 50 (.<$ 1 52t 

HIDB8. 

Dry - @ Ifl 

Wet salted 8 i" 

HONEY, BIO 



do 



Eastern.. 1 
SEEDS. 



Alfalfa. 

Canary 3lS 

Clover red 12 f 



Beeswax, lb 20 ( 

Honey in comb. 9 ( 
Houey in comb, 

fancy 12 @ 131 

Extracted, Ught. 4 u4 4; 
do dark. Sil 4- 
HOPS. 

Oregon 20 @ 27! 

Califonua 20 @ 27| 

ONIONS. 

Pickling — @ — 

SilveisiLin 75 @ 1 75 

NUTS-JOBBINO. 

Walnuts, Cal., lb Vim 

do Chile. - § 

Almonds, hdshl. 6 m 

Soft sbeU 15 a 

Brazil 10 «« 

Pecans 9 % 



White. 

Cotton 

Flaxseed 

Hemp 

Italian RyeOran 

Perennial 

HlUet, German.. 

do Common. 
Mustard, white.. 

Brown 2 2S I 

Rape 1 I 

Ky. Blue Oraai.. 1 1 i 

3d quality il i 

Sweet V. Gran. 70 I 

Orchard. SO i 

Red Top U I 

Hungarian.,.. 8M 

Lawn SO 

Mesqult 10 @ 

Timothy i\% 

TALLOW. 

Si Ornde, lb 1J(8 

IReiiued 6i(^ 

22 WOOL, BTO. 



13i 



BPRINO— 1886 
Humboldt aud 
Mundocino . . . 
Sact'o valley.... 
Free Mountain. 
Nliern defective 
S Joaquin short. 

do long 

Cava'v 4 F tbll. 
Oregon Eautern. 

du valley 23 @ 

Soutliem Coast. 13 M 

FALL-1886 

Southern, free.. 17 

do defective, . 12t^ 

Nortbero, free.. 20 (ft 

do defective.. 15 

Midillefrce 18 ift 

do defective.. 15 Iff 




The Citrus Fair in Chicacso.— The fruit 
from the Northern aud Central California Cit- 
rus Fair at Sacramento reached Chicago in 
prime order, save that one tine young banana 
plant naa frosted fatally in transit, and the dis- 
play was formally opened on the last night of the 
old year. F'reijuent telegrams speak of the 
good attendance, and the interest and admira- 
tion shown by visitors, who include fruit mer- 
chants, well-known citizens and ladies. 

Camellia Japoxica. — Superb plants charm- 
ing to the vision are those camellias, in bud and 
open blossom, white, pink and variegated, 
which H. H. Berger A Co. have just received 
from Japan and are showing at .'^17 Washing- 
ton street. The largest is a double white which 
stands about 15 feet high, including its mat- 
swathed ball ul earth, aud Mrs. B. values it at 
S'200. They arrived in tine order and are well 
worth calling to look at. 



Jan. 8, 1887.] 



fACIFie I^URAIo PRESS 



[From Rural Press of Jan. 1, 1887.] 

Better Rates for Payment in Atlyance. 

Wanted— 20.000 New Sabscrlbers In 1887. 

We are desirous of furnishing the Rural Press 
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scription, and give it their own patronage, and, 
as far as practicable, aid in circulating the jour- 
nal, and making its value more widely known 
to others, and extending its influence in the 
cause it faithfully serves. Subscription rate, 
$S a year. Extra copies mailed for 10 cents, if 
ordered soon enough. If already a subscriber 
please show the T)ap«r to others 



Our Agents. 

Our Frie.n'ds can do much in aid of our paper and the 
cause of practical knowletlge and science, by assisting 
Agents in their labors of canvassing, by lending their in- 
fluence and encouraging favors. We intend to send none 
but worthy men. 

J4RED C. HoAO— California. 

G. \V. Inoall-* — Arizona. 

E. L. Richards — San Diego Co. 

R G. HusTO.N— Montana. 

Geo. McDowkll— Fresno and Tulare Cos. 

J. C. SWKRNBV— Sonoma and Mendocino Cos. 

O. F. BERaMAN— Yolo and .Solano Cos. 

M. S. Prime — El Dorado and Placer Cos. 



Semi-Annual Meeting. 

The semi-annual meeting of the stockholders of 
the Grangers' C. U. A. will be held at the office of 
the association, corner of Tenth and K streets, 
Sicramento, on second Tuesday of January, 1887, 
at 10 o'clock A. M. A lull attendance is desired. 

By order of Directors. 

Cheap Money for Farmers. 

Farmers in this State will be glad to learn that 
they can borrow on mortgage any amount, from 
$5000 to $500,000, from S. D. Hovey, 330 Pine St., 
San J^rancisco, at 6 to 7 per cent and taxes. *• 



H. C. SHAW PLOW WORKS. 



20,000 IN USB! 





Reversible Mold board. 



SEND FOR PRICES AND CIRCULARS. 

201 & 203 El Dorado St., STOCKTON, CAl, 



WAKELEE^S 



THE BEST 



CHEAPEST. 




DON'r BUY 

AN 

Inferior Article 

BECAUSE IT IS 

More Profitable 
to some one 
else. 



SQUIRREL AND GOPHER EXTERMINATOR I 

IN 1-LB. AND 5-LB. CANS. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1888, the Board 
of Directors of The German Savings and Loan Society 
has declaied a dividend at the rate of four and tbirt.v-two 
one-hundredths (4 3'2 I00) per cent per annum on term 
deposits and three and sixty one-hundredths (3 60-100) 
per cent per annum on ordinary deposits, n.ayable on^and 
after tbe 3d day of January, 1887. By order. 

GEO. LETTE, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
SAN FRANCISCO^AVINGS UNION, 

532 California St., cor. Webb. 

For the half year ending witb Slst December, 1886, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four and ore- 
halt (4i) per cent per annum on term deposits, and three 
and tbree-'ourths (3^) per cent per annum on ordinary 
deposits, fr»e of taxes, payable on and after Monday d 
January, 1887. LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

I CURE FIT$! 

When I say cure 1 do not menn iiiuroly to stop Ihora lor a 
time and thebhtive them return a^ain, I mean aradlcnl cure. 
I have nijido the disease of FITS. EPH-El'SY or F.\LLINt> 
SICKNESS a llfe-louK study. Iwarrant my remedy tocnro 
the worst crises. Bocauso others have failed is no reason for 
not now recplvlng a cure. Senrl at oncf fnr n treatise and a 
Fr*»o Bottle of my infallible remedy. Give Express and Post 
Oilico. It costs you nothini? for a trial, and I will cure you. 

Address Pr. II. O. ROOT. 183 Pearl St.. New York. 



HENLEY'S 

IMPROVED 
MONARCH 

FENCE 
MACHINE. 



Patented July 21, 1885, May 18, 1886, August 3, 1886. 
The only practical machine in use that makes the fence 
in tbe field wherever wanted; makes the best, strongest, 
and most durable fence tor general use and farm and 
stock purpoFes; weaves any size picket and any size wire. 
The fence will turn all stock without injury to same. 
For catalogue and full particulars, address 

M. C. HENLEY, Sole Manufacturer. 
Factory, 623 to 633 North I6th St., Richmond. Ind. 




Should consult 
DEWEY& CO. 
American 



California Inventors 

ANi> FoREiuN Tatknt Solu iTitus, for nbtaiiiiug Pateuts 
and Caveats, KstaMi^hed in 1860. Tlieir loug experience as 
j(nirnalists and large praf'tice as Patent attorneys enables 
them to offer Pacific Coast Inventors far better service 'ban 
they can obtain elsewhere. Send for free circulars of infor 
matioD. Office of the Mining and Scientific Press an 
Pacific Rural Press, No. 252 Markefc St., San Francisco 
Elevator, Vi Froat St. 



O N 30 O AYS^'TRIAL, 

THIS NEW 

iELASTIC TRUSS 

"Has a Pad difTerent from all 
others, is cun shape, with Self- 
adjusting Ball incenter.adapts 
itself to all pesitions of tho 
^ body while the ball in the cup 
i presses back the Intes- 
— _ fines just as a person 

does with the finger. With light pressure the Her- 
nia is held securely day and niprht. and a nadical euro 
certain. It is easy, durable and chean. Sent by mad. Cu> 
cularslree. KUGLSSION TBUSB CO., Chicngo, IIU 





RUPTURE 

UuickLvaiMl l',„ aiai\nntly 
(lurBil liy tliH Ci'li-liriiti d 
Dll. riEKt'E'Sl'.VTENT 

tVIACNtTIC ELASTIC TRUSS 

Oririnal and Only Genuine 



t 304 
8704 



E'ectrlcTruss. Perfect Retainer 
iasy to wear. Instantly relieves ev(.Ty| 
case. Has cured thousands. Kstiil).lH7' 
iSend for Free lllustr'd Pamphlet No 
fWACNETIC ELAST ICTRUSS CO 
NORTH SIXTH STREET. ST. LCUId. MO. 
SAC'MENTO ST., SAN FKANC18C0. OAL. 



i 



NEW 



Sample Book of bi^autifwl cards, \\ Games, 
V2 tricks in raatiic. i:>i> Album verses. AM for 



The Great Nursery of 

PERCHERON HORSES. 

200 Imported Brood Mares 

Of Choicest Families. 

l.vrge; ]vuiTiJBit:RS, 

All Ages, both Sexes, 
IN STOCK. 




SOO to 4»)0 lltll'OKTEn ANlVUAL.f.Y 

from Friince.all recorded with extended pedifri ees in the 
I'crcheron Stud Books. Tho Pcrcheron isthe only draft 
bleed of Franco possessing a stud book that has tho 
support and endorsement of the French Government. 
Send for 120-paga Catalogue, illustrations hy Kosa 

Bonhcur. M.W.DUNHAM, 

Wayne, DuPage Co., Illinois. 



THE 



Perpetual Incubator and Brooder. 




The most successful "business" Incubator ever in- 
vented. 

The only Incubator in which egga can be introduced 
dail3' and hatch successfully. 

Kerjuires no heat " reiiulator." The heat is scientific- 
all v graduated to suit the different periods of incuba- 
tion. 

Three sizes made, viz.; 1, 2 and 3 dozen eggs per day. 
Send for circular to 

JOHN WOBSWICK, 
Grangpvllle, Tulare Co., Cal. 



BULBS. SEED. 



Hyacinths, $1.25 per dozen, colors separate; named 
varieties, $2.00 per dozen; Tulips, 40 cents; Crocus, 20 
cents; Anemones, double and single, 40 cents; Snow 
Drops, sinirle, 30 cents, double, 60 cents per dozen— all 
flowering bulbs. 



PANSIES. 



Our strain is the very finest grown. Giant Odier, 
50 cents per pkt French Monstre, 25 cents. Giant 
Timardeau, 25 cents. Fourteen other fine sorts, 
colors separate, for $1. 

The above Bulbs and Seed sent free by mail on receipt 
of price, but orders for Bulbs must amount to $1.00. 
address 

W. A. T. STRATTON, 

Petaiuma. Cal. 



J. L. HEALD'S 

AGRICULTURAL WORKS. 

Crockett, Contra Costa Co,, Cal. 

Stationary Engines and Boilers. 

PorlaWe Slraw-Bnruing Boilers & Eigiies, 

IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS. 

Machinery of all kinds furnished at shortest notice. 



Heald's Patent Wine-making Machinery, 

including Grape Crushers and Stenimers, Elev.ator8, Wine 
Presses and Pumps, and all apjiliances used in Wino 
Cellars. Irrigating .and Drainage Pumps. Heald's 
Patent Kn^ine Governor. Ktc. 



Fruit FnnrnvinnC The finest, best and cheap- 
null Cliyi dVIIiyb, est Photographs and En- 
PHOTOGKAPH.S, KTC. gravings of Fruics, Vfge- 
fcibles. Houses, Farms, Ijandscapes, etc,, made by S, J?\ 
PuOTOoaAVUiu Co., 659 Clay St., S F. 



38 



fACIFie [^URAlo p>RESS. 



[Jan. 8, 1887 



Jeeds, Hauls, ttc. 



Barren Hill Nursery 

NEVADA CITY, CAL. 

SPECIALTIES : 

NUTS, PRUNES, AND GRAPES. 

The Finest Collection of Nut-Bearing Trees 
to be found in the United States. 

1 9 Varieties of Walnuts, 



CLUSTER WALNUT, 

The newest, niont prolific aud valuable variety ever intro- 
duced into t)ii8 country. 

PRGEPARTURIENS. 

Or Earl.v-Beurinj;, or Fertile Waln\it, iiitnxluced into 
California in 1871 by Felix Gillet. "SlcoihI Generation' 
Trees, jrrowii from nuts borne on the okioinal tree; 90% 
(guaranteed to be 'genuine FrosparturienH," or bavitijj 
retained tiie surpriwin;; characteristics of precocity, 
fertility and har<IliieHH of the orieiiiai Frajpartu- 
riens. "Third Generation" Trees, ^rrown from nuts borne 
on Hecond generation Frccparturiens. entirely Cali- 
fornia-jjrown; vigorous, hardy and fertile variet\'. 

Serotina. Franqnette, Majette. Cnaberte, 
Oant, Farisienne, Mesange Walnuts. 

The leading varieties of Euro)ie, hitrhly rccomnu;ndeti 
for beauty and quality of the nuta, fertility and hardiness 
of the kinds. 

O VarletixK of French Cheatuuts or Marronn 

(PropaKated solely by grafting). 
7 VarietieH of Filberts. 

4 Varieties of April Clierrieg, the earliest and 
most prolific In California. 

207 Varieties of Grapes, including the %'cry 
earliest Table \arietics known, such as Blue Miisc-at, 
Ischia, Maffdelcine, Malingre. I'earl of Aiivers, Bul- 
hery, Lu;<lienda, Dupont, Groa Sapat. etc. 

81 Varieties of Knglish Gooseberries, all 
sizes, shapes and colors, and "true to name." 

PRUNES! PRUNES! 

Lot D'Ento, or "I>'ETite true from the root." We have 
ourselves givtn tins name of ''Lot D'Kiite" to this type, 
BO extensively propagated in the valley of the Lot 
(France) True from the root and not grafte l, and 
which we have introiluced into this country. This ty|ie 
of the D'Kute Prune is not at all propagated by grafting, 
which would do away with its chief qualities of being 
more vigorous, more loii^-livud than grafted trees, 
and a gtiin-resistaut stuck. 

Saint Catlieriiie, "true from the root." — This kind 
Is altogether propagated true from tlie root in its 
home, valley of the Loire (France), and offers greater ad- 
vantages than grafted trees, as being also more vigorous, 
more long-lived, and a gum-resistant stock. 

We highly recommend these two purest types of the 
two most celebrated kinds of French Primes, and have 
divided our stock into three sizes, which we offer at §20. 
$30 and S40 per hundred. All such trees are imported 
from the two great prune districts of France, but have 
been from one to three years in our grounds, and have, 
like all our mountain-grown trees, a line system of roots. 

For the Season of 1887-88, the U'Knte, the 
purest and largest tyjie of the Prune D'Knte, or D'Agon, 
or Robe de Sergeut (solely progagatei by jfrafting). 

APRICOT.S — Boulbon, Esperen, Unclos, 
Mexico, the shipping varieties of the south of France. 

Constantinople Ouince — The largest, mosi pre- 
cocious and prolific of ail quinces. 

Ever-beariut; Blacii Mulberry of Spain- 
Medlar, Sorbus (all those kinds should have a place in ad 
gardens). 

Mulberry Trees for Silkworm Feeding. 
Silkworm Eggs. 
SERICULTURE CHART, 50 Cts. 

^S^Send for General Catalotrne ami Supplement with 
Chapters on "Nut-bearinif Trees" and "Prunes," illus- 
trated with 20 walnut cuts, 5 prune cuts, and numerous 
other cuts representing' M&dlar. Sorbut>, BUck Mulberry^ 
French Chestuuts, Filberts, etc. 

FELIX GILLET, 

Nevada City, Cal. 



Fine Small Fruits a Specialty. 

CaTHRERT RASPBERRY. 




BEST MARKET BRKKV KNOWN ! LarRe, 
Firm and Luscious, stands travel finely, bears im- 
mensely, and has two crops a year; 75 cents per dozen; 
S3 per 100. Also Strawberries, Blackberries, Gooseber- 
ries, Currants, etc., of finest imported varieties. l*rices 
on application. 

L. U. McCANN, Santa Cruz. Cal. 



PEPPER'S NURSERIES. 

Established i.n 1S5S. 

Apricot, Plum, Prune and Peach on Myrobolan Plum 
tocks. Bartlett, Winter Nelis, B. Clairgeau, B. Hardy 
and other varieties, 1 and 2 years. A full stock of 1 and 
2-year-oId Apple Trees, Peach on Peach, Nectarine, 
Quince, Fig, Ora|s>, Currants, Gooseberries, Almonds, 
Walnuts, Chestnuts, etc. Prices reasonably low. No 
scale bug. Also Mvrobolan Plum and Pear Seedlings, 
borne utowu. Adiiim W, U. I'EPf ££, ftitalumft, C»l. 



NAPA VALLEY NURSERIES. 

(Succes.sor to COATBS & TOOL.) 




The Finest Shipping and Canning Cherry in the World 

GENERAL NURSERY STOCK. 

Headquarters for Centennial Cherry, Muir Peach, Love-all Peach, 

Glaister Plum, Etc. 

All Stock nnirrlKated and free from disease. One Centennial Cherry Tree given 
away with every order amounting to $10 and over. 

£V.My elegant Souvenir Card, containing best Insect Remedies, and much other valuable information to the 
Fruit Grower, free to every customer, or sent to any applicant on receipt of ten cent'. 

LEONARD COAXES. P. 0. Box 2. Napa City. Cal. 



460 ACRES. 



INCORPORATED 1884. 



CALIFORNIA NURSERY COMPANY 

NILES, ALAMEDA CO., CAL. 
JOXZINT H.OOIX., 3VI«.n.o.sox-, 



LARGEST STOCK ON THE PACIFIC COAST! 



OFFER rOH THE SEASON AN KXCKPTIONALLY FINE STOCK OK 

Fruit Trees, Semi-Tropical Trees. Small Fruits, Grape- 
vines, Resistant Vines, Etc., Etc. 

All the Standard Sorts are grown in large quantities, also many 
New and Rare Sorts never offered before. 

SPECIALTIES: 

PLUMS, PRUNES, and APRICOTS 

PEACH ON ST. JULIEN PLUM, 

HATCH'S ALMONDS, and 

MUIR PEACH. 

Our Apple, Pear, Plum, Prune, Apricot, and Cherry are grown on imported stock, on new 
land, isolated from any old orchards and are free from all insects and defects. An inspection is 
solicited by all those intending planting the coming season. 

Four Trains leave and return daily from San Francisco for Niles. 

Our Facilities for Packing and Shipping to distant points are unsurpassed 

^'Descriptive Catalogne will be mailed gratis upon applicatiop. Address all communica^ 
tions : 



CYPRESS AND GUM TREES. 

All fresb, hardy, stocky trees. Monterey Cypress, S to 
12 inches high, transplanted in boxes of 70* trees each, at 
82 per box or *25 )>er 1000: 12 to IS inches, of 50 trees 
jjer box. at $4 per 100 or «35 per 1000. Seedlings, 3 to 4 
inches, at oer 1000. Blue Gums, 8 to 12 inches, of lOn 
per box, at «1.50 per 100 or *14 per 1000: 12 to 18, of 70 
per box, at 81. .SO, or $20 per 1000; 18 to 24 inches, 60 v>cr 
box, at $1.75, or S30 per lOOO. Large, straight sacked ■ 
bulked (Juins or I'incs sliip|>ed only after the roots ha . 
sprouted through sacking. Blue, 4 to 6 feet, at S15 per 
100; 6 to S feet at 820 per 100; S to 10 at ilh per HX). 
Red or Round Leafed Gums, 4 to 6 feet, at $20 per 100: 
8 to 8 feet at $26 per 100. Pines, 2 to 3 feet, at S'O per 
100. Acacias, 2 to 3 feet, of 30 trees per box, or 3 to 4 
feet of 20 trees per box. at 82 per box. Also fresh- 
gathered, strong.growing seeds of the Monterey or 
Italian Cypress, Blue, Keil or Iron Bark Oum or Acacia 
in variety at lowest rates. Postage Stamps taken for 
orders not exceeding $2. No other than the best of 
stock will be sent frim this nursery, as we desire to 
make a friend of every cash eustonicr. 

GEO. B. BAILEY, Part Nursery, 
Berkeley, Gal. 



C. M. SILVA & SON, 

NURSERYMEN, 
Lincoln, Oal., and Newcastle, Cal. 

CUOICR STOCK or ALL KINDS OF 

FRUIT TREES, SMALL FRUIT, 
PLANTS, Etc. 

McDevitt Cling Peach, Walling Plum, Botan Japan 
Plum, Coosa Nectarine, Chestnuts, Pomegranates, Mul- 
berries, etc. Fay's Prolific Currant, Hansell and Souhe- 
gan Raspberries, Balmont Strawberr>', etc. 
larSKNU FOR Cataloguk. Address 

O. M. SILVA & SON, 

Newcastle, Cal. 



CALIFORNIA 



NURSERY COMPANY, 



B. V. CUTTINGS. 

^3ox*deAxuc. AT'm'lo'tjLeei. 

I OFFER FOR SALE, AT $10 PER M., 

20O.0O0 CUTTINGS of the f«llowing renowned 
varieties, tule packed, K. O. B. at dejmt; Cabernet Sau- 
vignon, Caliernet-Kranc, Merlot, Verdot, Ualbec, Tintu- 
ricr, Portal-Ploussard, Mondense, Petite Sirrah and 
Grosse Blue. Also from .*2..Mi to 85.00 (ler M. all other 
well-known wine and table grape varieties, too numerous 
to mention. The above Grape Cuttings are from our 
vinejard, and we guarantee them true to name, healthy, 
in good condition, and f ITered at lowest market price. 
Ten (10%) per cent invariably In adva-ce on siuall orders. 
Information furnished, if desired. Will not guarantee 
cuttings procureil for accommodation from other vine- 
\ ards, but will always select them from responsible par- 
ties and in healthy locations. The Burgundy and Bor- 
deaux varieties are verv scarce, and |«rtlc» desiring to 
plant this winter would do well to secure their cuttings 
at once, and save money and disappointment. 

J. B. J. PORTAL, 
Box 627. San Jose, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 




Ymi want 
^IMM-Iili**ii. nnd 
,1 A III.K 

- invaluable t^> all 
I'J't piiK4'M. in rlu.lini; 

S, Vit^ES, 
■RUITS. 

JICEST OLD. 

THE STORRS & HARR]^N CO. 

PAINKSVIL,L.Ii:, L.AKK COm%IIIO. 



FREE f 

ROSES, 
SHR 



■I !>• R A R 
XM Yea 



CAREY'S NURSERIES, 

Successors to the O. W. Chllds Nurseries, 
LOS ANGELES, OAL. 

FOR SALE, SEASON 1886-87. 

The lan;est, )>eRt K^rown, KcHt rootetl, clcanoHt, healthiest 
Htock of Kruit TreeH in Southern ('alifornia, all true to 
label, consmtinif, as !4)^>ecialtit's, n( Olive, Orany-e, Lemon, 
Lime and Bartlett Pear. Price Lmt free. AddreHH 
THOS. A. GAREY. A^ent. 
P. O- Box 462- Los ADseles, CaL 

SAN LEANDRO NURSERY. 

FINE ASSORTMENT OF tub LEADING VAHIETIES Of 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES. 

The Hardy White Tuscany, Hardy Yellow 
Tuscany, Clingstone Peaches. 

LARGEST PEACHES IN CALIFORNIA, aplendid 
flavor; good shii>|>ers; excellent for canning. 
Gum and Pepjier Trees in boxes. 1-lowers and Shrubs. 
jTlTAll trees grown on new. rich soil, without irriga- 
tion, and are (>ositi\clv free from insect t>ests. 

G TOSETTI, 
San Leandro, Alameda Co., Cal. 

Home-Grown RYE GRASS SEED. 

In Lots of Half a Ton, at 10 cents 
per pound. 
JOHN W. FERRIS, 

Black Point. Marin Co., Cal. 
SOW EARLY. 30 lbs. to the acre. 

FRENCH PRUNE TREES FOR SALE. 

For sile, about 2C00 French Prune Trees. 2 years old, 
large, healthy trees, free from insects, at pe' lOOO, or 
$5 per 100. Apply to B. SCI I ULTE. one-half mile west 
of Wayne (a local station 4 miles north of Sau Jose), or 
address P. O. Box 132, San Jose, Cal. 



Large atock; fine plants; for the season of 1SS6-S7. 
Addre|s 

T. J. SWAYNE!, Nfttioual City or S»9 piegu, 



Jan. 8, 1887.] 



f ACIFie I^URAId f ress. 




Cox§ 



NEW 



a> OF 

eects 

FOR I 



^9"0ur New Catalogue for 1887, mailed free on appli- 
cation, contains description and price of Ve|,'etable, 
Flower, Grass, Clover, Tree and Field Seeds; Australian 
Tree and Slirul> Seeds; native California Tree and Flower 
Seeds, Fruit Trees, and many new novelties introduced 
in Europe and the United States. 

THOS. A. COX & CO., 
41 1, 413, 415 Ssnsome St., San Francisco. 



fHE DINOEE & CONARD GO'S 

BEAUTIFUL EVEK-Bl.OOMINti 




Our (J rent Spcrialtv is g'v)wing and distributing 
KO.S KS. We have all the latest novelties and Hnest 
standard sorts, in different sizes and prices to suit all 
wants. Over li><) chn'irrM i>iiri--ti/n to choose from. 
We send stront; Pot Roses safely by mail to all Post 
Offices, purclniser's choice of varieties, all labeled, 

3 TO 12 PLANTS S | . l^^^JM 

according? tr) value. Two yfifir Roses by express. Our 
N<^*v 4iui<l(', 78 pases, ek-(;antly illustrated, Free. 
Address Tllli l)lN(Ji:H A; t)<).NAKI» CO., 
Rose Growera, West Cirove, Chester Co. Pa* 



DEL MONTE VINEYARD NURSERY, 

FRESNO, CAL. 

♦ 

For Sale— White Adriatic Fig Cuttings of 

my own importation. Grape Roots and Cuttinf^s of 
Carignan, Mataro Grcnache, Teinturier, Trousseau, 
Carbenet Sauvigiion, Matbec and Muscat Frontignon, etc. 

M. DENICKB. 



Trees ! 



Tree* 



Trees ! 



Fine assortment of the leading varieties at the follow- 
ing reduced prices, to the trade: 

2000 Apples 5 to 10c. 9500 Pears 5 to lOe. 

6700 Apricots i to 8c. 7800 Cherries 6 to lOo. 

7700 Prunes 4 to 8o. 2050 Peaches 4 to 8c. 

4600 Plums 4 to 8c. 1000 Japan Plums. 6 to 12c. 

ALAMEDA NURSERY. 
A. Cleveland, ■ - - Alameda, Gal. 



PnANTSEED COMPACT'S RELIABLE. 




Write forthelr ILltlSTBATED CATALOOUE. Addr«s3t 

PLANT SEED COMPANY. 

BI2 NORTH FOURTH STREET, SAINT LOUIS. MO. 

(Mention this Paper.) 



1,000,000 GRAPE CUTTINGS 

At $3 per M. 

Muscatel, Muscat, Sultana, Flame Tokay and Emperor; 
also Rooted Vines at 812 per M. 

OAK SHADE FRUIT CO., 

DavlsvlUe. Yolo Co , Oal. 



ALFALFA SEED. 



In carload or smaller 
lots. l-resh, clean, 
and free of foul seed. 
Also all varieties of Grass, Clover, Garden, Flower, and 
Field Seeds. Send for Catalogue and special quotations 
on large orders. W. R. SlfiONG & CO., Sacra- 
mento. Cal. 




ibiey's Tested Seed 

Catalogue free on application. 
Send for it. 
IIIKAM SIBLEY & CO.. 
UOCUESTEU, N. V. & CHICAGO, ILL. 



s 



100,000 Olive Cuttings for Sale. 

ArPLT TO 

C. A. BANCROFT, San Dieeo, Cal. 
Or to THE HISTORY CO., S. F. 



TREES! TREES! TREES! 

BY THE DOZEN, 100, 1000, or 100,000. 

Our Stock this Season Cannot be Excelled on the Coast, 

Neither in quantity, quality, varieties, size of trees, nor for health and vigor of same. We offer gl each for every 
scale bug found on our nursery trees. 

OUR PRICES ARE VERY LOW THIS YEAR. 

Send for our new and beautiful lithograph-cover Tree and Seed Catalogue. See in it description o 

OUR NEW TRAGADA PRUNE, 

The very earliest, good shipping Plum. There are fortunes in It. Also our new and fancy 

JAPANESE ORANGES, CAMPHOR TREES, TEA PLANTS, 

And other novelties. Our Seed Store carries an immense stock of Seeds of every variety at bottom figures, both 
wholesale and retail. 

Send for Catalogue; it is the finest in the State— an ornament to any parlor table. See our Stock, if posbiblb, 
or write to us. Address 

W. R. STRONG & CO., 



60,000 OXjIVE TH-EUS! 

Quinces, 

Loquats, 

Guavas, 
Medlars, 

Persimmons, 

Pomegranates, 

Mulberries, 
Small Fruits, 

Rhubarb, 

Asparagus, 
Ornamental Trees, 

Roses, Etc. 




Cherries, 
Peaches, 
Apricots, 
Nectarines, 
Figs 



Santa Uosa Nurseries are now and always have been FKEE FROM SCAI.E, and the unusual care which 
has always been taken to have everything that leaves our nurseries true to name, and in the best possible con- 
dition to grow, has given them a reimtation for reliability which has caused our sales to more than double 
every year for ten years. ISTElegant Cataloquk free. 

LUTHER BUBBANK, Santa Rosa, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



Fancher Creek Nursery. 

VALUABLE AND NEW 

PEACHES, NECTARINES, APRICOTS, PRUNES, ALMONDS, FIGS, OLIVES, POME- 
GRANATES, MULBERRIES, 

Japan Fruits, Grapes, Texas Umbrella Trees, Roses, 
Oleanders, Hedge Plants & Ornamental Plants. 

ADRIATIC FIGS, NEW OLIVES & SABALKANSKY GRAPES 

Pamphlet on Fig Culture, 10 cents. New Catalogue, containing full degorlptions and guide for 
Amateur Rose-Growers, now ready. Address 



J. N. KNOWLES, Manager. EDWIN L. GRIFFITH, Secreta 



MANOFACTCRERS OF 



Oils. 



WHALE OIL SOAP, 

STRONGEST MADE ON PACIFIC COAST. 
Especially adapted lor Vineyards and Fruit Orchards. OFFICE— 28 California St., San Francisco. 



33d 
YEAR 



[STOCKTON NURSERY. 1 

WHITE ADRIATIC, 



33d 
YEAR 



SAN PEDRO, SMYRNA, and ENDRICH FIGS. 

Praoparturiens, Macrocarpa, Mayette, and Chal)erte Walnuts, ChestnutH, Persimmons, Mulberries, Olives, 
Oranges, Lemons, Pears, Apples, Peachea, Apricots, Cherries, *^to. Plutns and Prunes on Myrobolan Stock, Grape- 
ines. Ornamental Trees, Shrubs, Palms, Magnolias, Clematis, New lloaes and Hothouse Plants. 

TRY THE PERSIAN MULBERRY. 

NO SCALE — I wish particularly to call the attention of Fruit growers to this fact. I have repeatedly had 
my nursery examined by experts, and upon no occa-ion have they found any scale or any indication of scale. The 
nursery is isolated from orchards, both old and new, and as 1 take every precaution in importing new varieties to 
get only clean stock, I feel perfectly warranted in guaranteeing every tree sold by me free from scale and other 
pests that are proving so diwastrous to the fruit interests of the State, send for Catalogue. 

E. C. CLOWES, Proprietor, Successor to W. B. WEST. 

Stockton, Cai,., October 27, 1S86. 
This is to certify that we the undersigned have this day thoroughly inspected the Stockton Nursery; that we 
found DO Scale or indication cf Scale, and that to the best of our knowledge and belief the Stockton Nursery is tree 
of this dreaded pest. 

WM. H. ROBINSON, Quarantine Guardian San Joaquin Fruit District. 
JOS. HALE, County Commissioner of Horticulture. 



-fSHINN'S NURSERIES4- 

Wc offer to the public our usual excellent and well. assorted stock of 

FRUIT, NUT & SHADE TREES, 

SHRUBS AND PLANTS. 

ALL OUR TREES ARE GUARANTEED FREE PROM SCALE, 
and are grown without irrigation on new land distant from old orchards. 

4^ We would call especial attention to our ** Bulletin" Smyrna Fig, imported by uh 
direct from the Levant and now proved, in numerous instances of fruiting, to be the 

TRUE FIG OF COMMERCE. 

Send for Catalogue. 

SHINN & CO., Niles, Alameda Co., Cal. 



FRUIT TREES!} Established ises. {FRUIT TREES! 



THOS. MEHERIN, 

Agency of CALIFORNIA NURSERY CO.. Niles, Alameda Co., Cal. 

We have now for sale at Lowest Market Rates the Largest, Best Selected and Healthiest Stock of 

Fruit Trees, Grape Vines, Olives, Small Fruits, Etc. 

Ever offered on the Pacific oast, including all the new varieties, all grown on new land at the above Nur- 
sery and free from scale and other pests. Samples of the trees always on hand. 

jSoeds ! Soods ! Soods ! 

WB HAVB ALSO CONSTANTLY ON HAND A LARQg AND FRRSO STOCK OP 

Grass, Clover, Vegetable, Flower, and Tree Seeds, 

And Ornamental Trees and Plants, Bulbs, Roses, Magnolias, Palms, etc., 
at LOWEST RATES. Now Catalogue for 1887 mailed on application. 



P. O. Box 2059. 



THOS. MEHERIN, 516 Battery Street, 

. SAN PKANCISCO. CAL. 



gUSTAV BISBN, Maaager, 



FRESNO, 



SEEDS ^PLANTS 



/V/))FRUIT<">ORNAMENTALTREES,CRAPE VINES 

ANVTHIIVG IN THE NUKSEKY LINE, wilhout first writing 
forourvaluahh-FREEfatalogue, tho|2l LARGE GREENHOUSES 
BEST wcever Issued, containing the Rarest New and | 33d YEAR. 700 ACRES. 

Choicest 01(1. THE STORRS & HARRBSON CO. PfllNESlMLLE, OHIO. 



JVhat Mr. Beyer says:„:j;j- 

best thanks for tlie HplcncUd m'cd« rocc;ivcd from your firm. 
It would Ik; a rather Icni^lhy lint if 1 Bliould name all, but 
uill say that anion i;Ht 38 tirnt, and 3 sccoud pri'miunis 
awarded mc at our fairs in Nortliern Indiana and 
Southern Michigan, 28 first premiums were for vc(^c- 
tables raised from your seeds. What firm can beat 
tliis?'* AiJui.iHT Beyer, yo. Bend, Ind. 

Seed of this quality T am now ready to sell to every one 
who tills a farm or i)Iants a i,'ardt;n, sending them FKEK my 
"egetablo and Flower Seed < 'al;iloi.'ue, for 1S87. Old customers 
need not write for it. 1 eataloL^ue this season the native wild 
potato. JAS. J. II. (illEtjiOUV, Seed Grower, Marblehead, Muss. 



SEEDS! SEEDS? SEEDS! 

Fox- 1886 «,ixci 1887. 

FRKSn STOCK OF 

Gr^rt-iDEriNr ^-Nny Jb" "ihji-.id JSe:e:i>s i 

All of this year's growth, lor sale at the GEO. F. SYLVESTER SEED WAUEIIOUSE, Nos. 315 and S17 
WASflfNOTQJJl STOET, SAN fMNgiSCO, SAMUEL BRBOK, ProprJetJOr- 



40 



f ACIFie I^URAlo f RESS. 



[Jan. 8, 1887 



Mason SlHamlin 



ORGANS. 



Highest nonors at -ill (Jii iit Wi.iid's ExhlhitlOM foi 
rtnetcen years. W stylrs. tn For f'aali, Eass 

Pajiuents, or licQtud. Catalufue, Vi jip., 4to, free. 

PIANOS. 

The Improved Motliod of StrlnKlnp, Introduced and 
perfeeted liy Masdn & IIaju.in, (s ccmceil.d by com- 
petent JudBos to eoustltutc a nidical advance in Plan(> 
lorte construction. 

Uonot leijiiire one-quarter as much tuning as Planot 
generally. Descriptive CaialoKue by mail. 



ORGAN &PIANaCG 



154 Tremont St., Boston, 149 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 
46 E. 14th St. (Union Sq.), N, Y. 



UNION IRON WORKS, 

SACRAMENTO, OAL. 

ROOT, NEILSON & CO., 

WAXI FACTIIRER8 OK 

Steam Engines, Boilers, 

AND ALL KINDS OK 

MACHINERY FOR MINING PURPOSES. 

FlouriUK Mills, San- Mills and Quart/ Mills Maeliinerj 
constructed, fitteJ up and repaired. 



Front St.. bet. N & O .Sts., 



Sacramento, Cal. 



Kxtreinely Low 



The New Cast AJAX TINNERS' SHEARS. 

Cut'in^ edg-eg, 
2 inihe«; e'lges 
chilled and hard 
as steel, equal to 
the beat steel 
goods in cuttiujj 
qualities. 




Price, 60 ct8. each, 

Postage, 16 ets. OSBORN & ALEXANDER, 

MechanlcH' TooIh, Hardware and Machiuery, 
688 Market St. , San Francisco. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR WHITE ADRIATIC FIGS. 




THE 

Largest Stock of Trees In 
the State. 

The only Fig that should 
be planted for Drying. 

ALSO A LARGE STOCK 
OF OTHER TREES : 

APPLES, 

PEARS. 

PEACHES, 

PLUMS, 

PRUNES. 

APRICOTS, 

CHERRIES, 

NECTARINES, 

OLIVES, 

ORANGES, 

LEMONS, 

Shade Trees and 

Ornamental Shrubs, 
Greenhouse Plants, 

Roses, Etc. 

A complete assortment of Rooted 
Grapes ami Cuttings. All trees wa 
ranted free from Scale or Aphi 

^F'Cataloj.'ue free. 

W. M. WILLIAMS, 

FRESNO, CAL. 



GRANGERS' CO-OPERATIVE STORE, 

TENTH AND K STREETS, SACRAMENTO. 




DEALERS INT 



General Merchandise, Groceries, Agricultnral Implements, Wagons, 

CARRIAGES AND BUGGIES. 

■A. INTe-WT' XI>o«,l. 
We buy for cash and sell for cash. The old credit system has been abandoned. We will not 
be undersold. We guarantee all goods as represented. We will give good value for 
your money. Our motto is quick sales and small profits and speedy returns. 
it^Farmers and consumers will find it to their interest to call and see us and be convinced. 

E GREER. Manager. 



Full Directions on the Growth and Culture of RAMIE Free on Application. 



FIELD. GARDEN, FLOWER AND TREE 

— SEEDS - 

JAPAN PERSIMMON SEED AND TREES. 

TRUMBULL & BEEBE, 419-421 Sansome St., SAN FRANCISCO. 



FOR SALE AT BEDROCK PRICES 



Fruit Trees, Roses, Ornamental Shrubsi^ Shade Trees 

ALL WITH GOOD FIBROUS KOOTS. 



Before Purchasing Elsewaere. Please Send for Special Price List. 

KELLER'S NURSERIES, ''^l,?;'^- OAKLAND, CAL. 



p. O. BOX 73. 



PALACE! 

DYE WORKS, 

()33 Market St. under Palace Hotel, San Francisco, Cal 

All kinds of I-adics* and Gents* Carments Cleaned and 
Dyed. WE EXCl- 1^ Send for L ireular of Prices. 

CBAS, J. U01<aLE!S, }[an»gcr. 




ARCHITECT, 

Builder and Sujierin'd't. 
Preliminary 11rawin(rg 
and Kiitiujatcs furnished 
gratuitously. Hans and 
S|>ecifications prepared 
with accuraey. No. 6 

Bddy atreet, S. F. 




PULVERIZING HARROW, CLOD 



Crusher and 
Leveler. 



Sub.ject8 the soil to the action of a Steel Crusher and Leveler. and to the Cutting, 
Lifting, Turninir process of Double Gangs of Cast Steel Coulters.— Immense cutting 
power. Crushing, Leveling and Pulverizing performsd at the same time. Entire ab- 
sence of Spikes or Spring Teeth avoids pulling up rubbish. The only Harrow that 
cuts over the entire surface of the ground. 

We make a variety of sizes from 3 to 15 feet wide. 

The '*.'VCME ** is in practical use ill nearly ex'ery .\ifricultural County on the Pueitic Coast, and has proved 
itself to be just the tool for 

VINEYARDS, ORCHARDS AND GRAIN FIELDS. 

I^Send for Pamphlet containing Thousands of Testimonials from 48 States and 
Territories. 

Manufactory and Principal Office, MILLINGTON, MORRIS CO , N J. 
N. B. - "TILLAGE IS MAKCltE," Asu Otukk Essays, sent free to parties who HAstK rum papek. 
For Sale on the Pacific Coast by 

G. B. Adams & Son, San Gabriel. Cal.; Arthur W. Bull, San Francisco, Cal.; 
Slaver & Walker, Portland, Or., and Walla Walla, W. T. 



THE "ACME" PULVERIZING HARROW 

Is the most Thorough Implement invented for the Cultivation of the soil. It will save 
its cost many times in a season. 

READ WHAT A PROMINENT COLOSA RANCHER SAYS OF IT: 

ConT.'jA, April 4, 1886. 
ARTHUR BULL, Esq.— Dear Sir: I have given the "Acme" Pulverizing Harrow a 
thorough trial and find it far superior to any other Harrow I have ever used, not only for the 
Orchard and Vineyard, but in the Grain Field. It does the work fully twice as quick, leaving 
the ground in much better tilth. Dead weeds or stubble are no drawbacks to it. It goes along 
without any stoppages, and clears itself. It ought to be used by all grain raicers. 

J. R. TOTMAN. 

ARTHUR 

No. 1 23 California Street, 



BULL, Sole Agent, 

San Francisco, Cal 




CHOICE FLOWER SEEDS 

OOC. vve»ill ^end l,v m;.il. |>r.-|.ui.V I O rALRC I O of the f.,11.^ 
" vuhlllblf ll.iwer Sw.d.s— AMKKS. new double dwarf biKiuet. I'Xtr; 

I f w . . r'....,..ni« .].... 1 ......v. Kir.... H. .1,1,1m ri.'li I'oliir^ ni«\ 



AT WHOLESALK 
PRICES. 

t. each) 
•lluwinit 

„ _ -.tra tine 

liirKM doulile, ri.llfolc.ru; nUNTIIlS 
«il.\.>T »;KH.>I AN I'.WfSIE.S 

- '•— • ' itif.il ni the 

. .. it ( A iDMde 

bnght colors; 

V KKIltN l.i:; c-..i» miied ; ZIN.VU l PunU""!.-). eltni larit.- d'l.le ; one tineOronnpntAl 
(;rw.t one splendid t lliiiUnk- f l.nt ; oni' lienutiful K>itI«,1hi» Howf p— in all. I J full 
■ - ' -30n.,ort«ofi>r.'VOr. Dirm:ti.>n-' f<.rniltivntmK.ine«ch. uiur 

^ -' - -- these Seeds by 

CSVILLE 



rare and - 

|{ALSA11> (Ciinellia tli.u.-red . 
ib'e l>iad.'m Pink), rich velvety eol. 
■ the Ilartz Mountains, tiermany. Il 



.l^i.,l.l^r.'i'»au.^lU..U»',lim..-i..:;iji..r.i.,n, ..«.»•.■...-. ■ 

fr.im the Ilartz M.nintains. tiermany. the linest. larire«t. most bnanl 
world; I'KTIMA.larjjetl.nverinK.alleolors.strilied.bli.tclied; IMUJTt 1. 
H..se howereil). nearly all d.iuble flowere; PHI OX nKt M JIKMlll, hn 
V . ....L V . 1.1 "ixed ; Zl%.\l A ( PunilMine). extra larired'ble; one tine 
llinklnk- fl.nt; oni' beautiful KirrU.lmr Howfp— it] 
)n.,ortwofor.'VOr. Dirm:ti.>n,' for unltivatiiiK .in ™. 
eataliujue accompanien oai-h nnler. WV t-niw these i 



r,i7.e pnrketM fi-. •■ 
beautiful illus. HH-pp. oatal 
the p<mnd. by the bunhfl. 




Vol. XXXIII.— No. 3.] 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 15, 1887. 



( $3 a Year, in Advance 

( Single Copies, 10 Cts. 



The University. 

Several recent occurrences make timely the 
sketches upon this page. It is probably gener- 
ally known that, upon its completion, the Lick 
Observatory will become the Lick Astronomical 
Department of the University of California. 
The lenses for the great refracting telescope 
were safely brought across the continent and 
are now in the safe at Mt. Hamilton; the great 
iron dome which will house the instrument is 
approaching completion in this city; the other 
portions need- 
ed for the erec- 
tion of the tel- 
escope are well 
in hand by dif- 
ferent expert 
manufacturers, 
and during the 
coming sum- 
mer the ob- 
servatory will 
be placed in 
the hands of 
the Regents of 
the Univer- 
sity. 

Another in- 
cident which 
draws popular 
attention t o 
the p h i 1 a n • 
thropic deeds 
of Mr. Lick is 
his final sepul- 
cher i n t h e 
foundation of 
the great tele- 
scope, which is 
described a t 
length upon 
another page 
of this issue. 
It is fitting in- 
deed that the 
memory of Mr. 
Lick should be 
honored; it ia 
appropriat e 
that his rest- 
ing-place should be in the institution which he 
has established. 

Our engravings are intended to emphasize the 
unity of the institutions of which sketches are 
given, and the fact that they are the property 
of the people of California. 

It is a matter for general congratulation that 
this crowning educational establishment of the 
State is now in excellent working condition, 
and that it never has been so strong in the pop- 
ular esteem and heart as now. These facts sig- 
nify that its course is onward and its spirit in 
harmony with the progressive spirit of the 
people. Judged by its faculty and pupils, by 
the tone of the comments of press and people, 
and by the recognition of its efiforts to incite 
all to fuller knowledge in all the departments of 
thought and labor, it is clearly enjoying popu- 
lar confidence and support. President Holden 
has accomplished much both in the internal and 
external condition of the institution during the 
year of his incumbency. 

There is apparent now a general disposition to 
advance the University as an institution worthy 
pf generous support. Of course, our l^ie of 



thought, we naturally look first at the advance- 
ment of its provisions for technical and indus- 
trial education. We know from our acquaint- 
ance with those engaged in these branches of 
the University work that they are honestly and 
diligently endeavoring to win esteem by merit- 
ing it, through devotion to their tasks and con- 
stant acquisition and improvement in their 
methods and materials. They believe and labor 
earnestly for the extension of sound practical 
training as the basis of true success and 
prosperity. No doubt the Legislature now in 



Cisco; with the magnificent institution on Mt. 
Hamilton soon to be added, and with such ad- 
ditional facilities as it is expected the present 
Legislature will provide, the University of 
California is indeed worthy of its name, and 
will prove a potent factor in the true advance- 
ment of our favored people. 



Citrus Fair at San Jose. — The fair to be 
opened in San Jose, Feb. 7th, under the aus- 
pices of the Horticultural Hall Association, 
gives promise of being a great success. Hon. 




BUILDINGS OP THE STATE UNIVERSITY AT MT. HAMILTON AND BERKELEY. 



session will be called upon to aid in the ad- 
vancement of this work, and we are glad to see 
that Governor Bartlett in his inaugural made 
this reference to it: 

The efiforts already being made by the peo- 
ple for establishing manual and technical 
schools should also be liberally encouraged. 
The technical departments of the University 
should be made as valuable as possible to the 
people throughout the State. It would be well 
to offer special inducements to public school 
students to arouse a greater interest in the in- 
dustrial arts and sciences. 

The vast agricultural, manufacturing and 
mining industries of the State need the most 
enlightened treatment, in order to compete in 
the markets of the world. It is but just to 
those who are to conduct these interests in the 
future that they should be prepared in as full a 
measure as possible to meet such great respon- 
sibilities. I would srggest, therefore, that 
your Committee on Education should make a 
thorough investigation as to the wants of the 
people in the way of better industrial training, 
and the best way of meeting those wants. 

With its excellent intellectual equipment and 
the disposition to employ its best efiforts in the 
public service; with its fine establishment at 
Berkeley Jknd itn ^Uie4 jnatitutions in Sa;) Fran- 



Cyrus Jones and Capt. Frank Dunn, who were 
commissioned to canvass the localities where 
citrus fruits are raised, have visited Los Gatos 
and Saratoga and the region round about, and 
report that more orange and lemon trees are 
planted and in bearing than they had any idea 
of, and ofifers of contributions to the fair were 
liberally made. At a meeting of the directors 
of the association last Saturday, it was decided 
to call the exhibition the Central California 
Citrus Fair, and to invite displays from the 
counties of Santa Cruz, San Benito, Monterey, 
Stanislaus, Merced, Fresno, Contra Costa, San 
Mateo and Alameda. 



Our Produce Market, — We are giving 
especial attention to our market reports for 
California produce, and desire to make them as 
complete and trustworthy as possible, for we 
fully appreciate the importance of such informa- 
tion to our readers. We shall be very glad 
to have suggestions from our readers as 
to any manner in which the market reports 
can be improved or made to serve producers 
needs better, 



Double Callas. 

The out of Colonel Woodham's double calla, 
which appeared in the Rural Press last week, 
has interested our readers in various parts of the 
State. Wm. Boots says they have noticed 
several at Milpitas, though only when the 
nights and mornings have been frosty, and 
sends us by express a very large and handsome 
specimen. Mrs, Viola K. Dunne also gives us 
tangible evidence that such a blossom has 
opened at San Felipe, Mrs. LucyE, Wiester, 

of S. F., writes 
that she has 
twice seen the 
like novelty in 
Flora's king- 
dom — once 
about 12 and 
then two years 
ago. In 1885, 
near Westmin- 
ster, Los An- 
geles Co., C. G. 
Scott saw two 
as perfect as 
the one pict- 
ured; and Flo- 
ra M. Kimball 
saysthe double 
calla is a fa- 
miliar sight to 
her, ,in both 
her own and 
neighbors' gar- 
dens at Na- 
tional City, San 
Diego county. 
She writes : 
"When the 
first one was 
seen, several 
years ago, it 
was a matter 

f curiosity, 
but now w e 
consider them 
quite ' ortho- 
dox.' " A Fres- 
no correspond- 
ent, formerly 
remembers a 

1 flower, with 



resident in New Zealand, 
brother marking just such 
the intention of raising seedlings which 
might develop an increased tendency to du- 
plication, but the blossom failed to produce 
seed. Among the communications thus elicited 
came a copy of our own paragraph, clipped 
from the paper, with the curt remark pencilled 
on the margin, *' Have been described years ago, 
twice, in your columns," which goes to show 
how carefully some of our patrons store away 
in memory the goods things served up, through 
the seasons, in the columns of the Rural Press. 



EuROPEAK Onions in S. F. — A novel impor- 
tation to be seen at L. G. Sresovich's last week 
was 500 crates of Spanish onions, which had 
come directly from Barcelona to New York, 
and thence by rail to this city. Their average 
size was large, some weighing two and one-half 
pounds, and they arrived in remarkably good 
order, considering the distance traveled. They 
were ofifered in lots at $2. '25 per 100 pounds, 
while the best California onions were selling at 
SL80 or $1.85. 



42 



fACIFie I^URAb f RESS. 



[Jan. 15, 1887 



CjoRRESPOJMDENCE. 



Correspondents are alone rosponeible for their opinionB. 

Stasia County Notes. 

Editors Press: — Away up the valley of the 
Sacramento among the wooded hills and dales 
of Shasta county, there is a little cottage where 
the RrRAL Press is a regular and always wel- 
come visitor — welcome not only because it is a 
live paper intelligently conducted in the farm- 
er's interest, which lies at the basis of all com- 
mercial prosperity, but also and equally because 
of its clean and healthy moral tone. We congrat- 
ulate you on the maintenance of a secular paper 
whose aims and purposes are such as to make it 
an inspiration to all that is good. May you re- 
ceive a higher reward than any men can bestow. 

Although we live almost in the shadow of 
" awful Shasta's icy shrine," yet the orange and 
the olive, the grape, fig, almond, peach, and all 
semi-tropical fruits flourish here, so far as in- 
troduced, luxuriantly. And as we have at least 
four times greater annual rainfall here than in 
Southern California, we dispense with irriga- 
tion, and very gladly also with the chills and 
fever which generally keep it company. The 
pine and the palm, the apple and the orange, 
here grow side by side, and roses are in per- 
petual bloom in sight of mountains whose sum- 
mits are always white with snow. ' I do not 
wonder that the " poet of the Sierras," Joaquin 
Miller, has purchased a section of land, in 
Shasta county, on which to make himself a 
home and is extravagant in its praise. This, of 
all the places I have seen, (and I have been 10 
years a commercial traveler) is best fitted to be 
a poet's home, and best of all, its beauty is only 
matched by its healthfulness. 

Our county takes its name from a noted 
mountain in Siskiyou county, which joins us 
on the north, and though this mountain seems 
very near on account of its ereat size (to Rsd- 
ding), it is in reality about T.") miles away. On 
clear days it can be distinctly seen with the 
naked eye 200 miles down the valley; it fur- 
nishes an unmistakable landmark and beacon 
to the traveler going northward. Even dull 
and prosy souls, in the presence of this magni- 
ficent emblem of power and grandeur, become 
poetic and almost reverential, and we ail say 
beholding it: " How small are we and how 
brief our day compared with that of many of 
the things by which we are surrounded." 
Towering 2000 feet above the line of perpetual 
snow, clad in robes of unchanging white. Mount 
Shasta stands in silent majfsty, like some giant 
sentinel watching the ages as they softly pass, 
and the generations of men that come and go 
with all their hopes and fears and joys and 
sorrows and passions and pains; that rise and 
fall and bloom and fade even as do the grass 
and the flowers in the valleys outstretched at 
its feet. Viewing this monument of Omnipo- 
tence, who can fail to be impressed with a 
sense of the power and majesty of Him who 
made it s\jch ? " The strength of the bills is 
His." We shall soon pass away, but this mag- 
nificent token of God's almighty power shall 
remain, and the men and women of the genera- 
tions which succeed us shall gaze upon it with 
admiration and awe until earth and time shall 
be no more. 

Raisin Interest. 
But to speak of things practically (and I am 
quite an old settler now, for this is my third 
year here), as this country is proving to be so 
well adapted to fruit-raising, and especially to 
the growth of the vine, it seems to me that the 
culture of the raisin grape in the near future 
will claim a greatly increased sliare of atten- 
tion and prove immensely profitable. In this 
branch of the fruit industry the fear of over- 
production or of overstocking the market need 
not trouble the grower, since we produce in the 
United States only about one-tenth of the rai- 
sins we consume, and it is certain that the Cali- 
fornia product is claiming more attention and 
meeting with greater favor every year in East- 
ern markets. And this growth of demand, 
with improved methods of handling and careful 
grading and packing, is sure to continue. Our 
Shasta county raisins are said, by actual test, to 
contain the highest percentage of su^ar of any 
yet produced in the State, and the atmosphere 
here is peculiarly suited to "sun-drying," 
which, however, always in my opinion should 
be supplemented by an evaporator, to fall back 
on when the sun does not serve. 

North and South. 
We, in Northern California, regret very 
much to notice an envious spirit on the part of 
some of our Southern California fruitmen. We 
do not wish to detract one iota from the fame 
they have justly earned, but we ask " the pat 
ronage of a fair opportunity." We ask to stand 
on and be judged by our own merits, and we 
claim that what has been done in Southern 
California can be repeated here, and time will 
prove we are right in this conclusion ! As our 
section is one of the newest brought permanent 
ly forward to public notice, so our lands are 
the cheapest, and the opportunity for settlers 
with limited means to come in and grow up 
with the country is the best. Considering 
these things, we are much gratified by the ex- 
hibit we made of Shasta county products at the 
recent Citrus Fair, in Sicramento — small in 
quantity, but excellent in quality. Neither 
shall we be forgotten at the California Citrus 
exhibit now being made in Chicago, since our 



" landman," Mr. D. N. Honn — who is the right 
man in the right place — has gone there to rep- 
resent us. 

In conclusion, permit us to say that if you, 
or any of your readers, see fit to come this way* 
to " look, ' to " invest " or to " settle," we 
promise you a courteous welcome in Redding, 
which is one of the most thriving and prosper- 
ous towns in California to-day, and will freely 
give you all the information in our power con- 
cerning the country where we have taken up 
our abode. A. M. Goousough. 

Redding, Shasta Co. 



Tuolumne County. 

The wintry rain falls free again, 
A nectar draught, for hill and plain ! 
Bright emerald green will soon appear. 
On barren soil long brown and sere. 

Editor-s Press: — A few days ago prayers 
were sent np for rain. Now the rains have 
come in gentle showers, at night, so that the 
labors of the day have not been interfered with. 
Nothing could be more favorable to growth 
than the warmth of these gentle rains. Stock 
of all descriptions has not suffered this fall, ow- 
ing to the fine feed left over since last spring. 
We have had some cold weather, but it was 
free from storm. No high winds attend the 
present wet spell — out of doors is truly healthy 
and delightful. Among these foothills, plow- 
ing was only delayed one day. Farmers can- 
not complain for lack of opportunity to put in 
extra acres for hay and grain. Summer-fallow- 
ed land is showing a good growth. With no 
great setback there seems no reason why next 
harvest should not be an exceptionally good 
one, and largely in excess of the last few years. 

The fruit interest will also recover from the 
blight of drought and grasshoppers. The past 
two years have been very discouraging for our 
foothill orchardists. But they show a bravery 
in persevering against every obstacle. They 
are bound to win at last, for Dame Nature will 
get tired of crippling enterprises well directed. 

For all the influx of immigrants, it is 
singular so few seek the foothill region. Only 
now and again a stray wanderer settles among 
us, and why is it thus? The great tide of 
humanity ebbs and flows toward Los Angeles 
and surrounding country. Capital is invested 
without being assured of the fitness of things. 
Many citizens of Tuolumne county settled and 
bought land in and around Pasadena. I learned 
to-night of one who cleared §10,000 in a few 
months by speculation, buying and selling 
land, making many of our staid citizens believe 
that they are only wasting their time by labor- 
ing on ranches for a nominal sum above a living, 
and often not that. Do the prices now paid for 
land in these favored localities warrant such 
enormous sums for a few acres ? The same 
amount would purchase a whole domain in 
these foothills, and land, too, which would out- 
yield their high-priced land, if the same culti- 
vation were followed up as is bestowed upon 
lands in orange and wine localities. By aud- 
by our foothills will be rated for what they are 
worth. Even now our fruits command a 
ready sale and top prices in San Francisco. 
Their flavor is unsurpassed, so far as table 
grapes and peaches are concerned. The higher 
altitudes of the county produce an apple 

perior to any grown upon a lower level. 
Why should capital invest in a ?500-acre, 
when it might procure 100 acres of product- 
ive land for the same amount ? Only 
one excuse may be given, and that is 
the lack of traneportation. Railroads have not 
found us yet, but that is a mere matter of time. 
Capital invested in fruits and other horticultur- 
al products would encourage capital to invest 
in rail facilties. When the great valleys be- 
come crowded, and maybe investments unprof- 
itable, our region will be sought after for vari- 
ety of products, and excellence in flavor and 
richness of fruits for table or distilling, or even 
for exporting. It is singular how some barren 
spots will nee in value when a corporate body 
purchases at a minimum value, surveys, adver- 
tises, and makes maps. There are always men 
ready for change, and many good families seek- 
ing a home, who pay a large price for a very 
sniall piece of ground, taking years of hard toil 
and labor to meet expenses and improve their 
purchase. No such conditions exist among 
these foothills. Variety of products and a veg- 
etable market for current expenses after a few 
months' labor. 

From all I have seen of valley lands and 
homes for the average husbandman, commend 
me to the valleys of the Sierras' foothills, where 
genial winds blow and fogs rarely intrude ; 
where fungus rarely grows from damp atmos- 
pheres; where water cool quenches thirst, and 
nature adorned with mountains grand greet 
the eye, and shut out the cold of the North and 
the fogs of the South. We have a golden-hued 
sky above and gold-lined soil beneath our feet, 
and would invite the seekers of a quiet rural 
home to visit the thermal belt before locating. 

John Taylor. 
Chinese Camp, Tuolumne Co. 



healthy; the scenery very beautiful. There is 
more flat land than one would naturally expect 
to see among the hills near the foot of Diablo. 
Lovely little valleys, numerous farms and vil- 
lages. 

The price of land is exceedingly low, com- 
pared with that of several counties where the 
advantages are really inferior. There will some 
day be a boom here as sure as fate, which will 
treble in value this whole region. I have seen 
first and last sufficient evidence of the capacity 
of soil, mildness of climate, etc., to convince 
me that the time ia near when this section will 
attract to itself thousands of searchers for beau- 
tiful homes where the grape, the olive, the 
palm, the orange and fig will grow to great perfec- 
tion and with a certainty not to be exceeded in 
California. 

I hope to take some special notes at my con- 
venience, and you may hear from me again. 
Pacheco. • 8. H. Herring. 



Poultry 



Contra Costa County. 

Editors Press : — Without going into detail, 
allow me to express myself as greatly pleased 
with this section of country. The chain of val- 
leys from Livermore to Martinez are surpris- 
ingly rich in soil. It seems to me that the 
capability of this region has never been fairly 
tested nor appreciated. The climate is fine and 



The Pablo Poultry Yards. 

Editor.^ Press : — Among all rural pursuits 
there is none more fascinating than the breed- 
ing and management of thoroughbred poultry; 
nor is there any single branch of agriculture 
more important. 

A few years ago it was said that there were 
no thoroughbred fowls except the Black .Span- 
ish in Southern California; but the magic wand 
of capital and enterprise touched her, and from 
a sleep of centuries she has awakened to life, 
luxury and beauty, and in all the wide world 
there ia no fairer land nor any which presents 
as bright a prospect for the future in poultry 
raising than does the (Jolden State. 

Mr. Paul Bancroft, whose model establish- 
ment, the Pablo poultry yards, occupies a 
prominent place on Fifth street, determined 
that his yards should not only be the best on 
the coast, but equal to the best in the 
country, sent his manager East to select 
breeding pens of the following varieties, which 
were carefully selected after a visit to a majority 
of the best yards in the East. Let us step into 
the Pablo poultry yards and look around. 

Wyandottes — a genuine American " inven- 
tion," and the most popular of all breeds. Here 
is a pen of the Preston strain; there is another. 
Yes, they are light in color, for many prefer 
them so. Now, if you wish to see darker ones, 
come this way. 

" Magnificent !" Yea, they are fine speci- 
mens of Hawkins' strain, and fanciers of the 
darker Wyandotte pronounce them royal birds. 
" What will that cock score ?" Wait for the 
next show. He is my ideal of a perfect bird, 
and undoubtedly without a rival on this coast. 
The Wyandotte is not only beautiful, but a good 
all around fowl for fancier and farmer, being 
a good layer, matures early, has yellow legs 
and skin, and is hardy and of a mild disposition, 
a good forager if let run, and contented in con- 
finement. They are not high-flyers and could 
be kept in bounds by a four-foot fence. 

Plymouth Rocks — Another American breed, 
another grand triumph of the breeder's art. 
The American Dominiciue and the Black Java, 
both birds of sterling qualify, were happily 
united in the nroductiou of so justly popular 
a breed as the Plymouth Rocks nave been and 
will long continue to be. They are Hawkins' 
strain. 

White Dorkings (Croad's strain) — The Dork- 
ing ia the most popular fowl in England, and 
has its champions in this country as well. 
Before England became a nation the Dorking 
was known. It takes us back to the ancient 
city of Rome. It is the most regal of the royal 
families. The White Dorking is bred with the 
rose comb, others (the silver gray and the col- 
ored) either with rose or single comb, although 
the greater number have the rose comb. As a 
table fowl they cannot be excelled, and they 
are good brooders as well as layers. Their 
peculiar shape and the fifth toe enables even a 
novice to distinguish them at a glance. 

Silver Spangled Hamburgs (.Schofield's 
strain) — "Speckled beauties" is applicable to 
fowls as well as to fish (trout); and it is easily 
understood how the handsome plumage of the 
Wyandotte is obtained when we know that this 
handsome fowl was a prominent actor in the 
drama. As layers they (the Hamburgs) stand 
in the front rank, and while their beauty rec- 
ommends them to the artist, their finely fla- 
vored flesh is warmly praised by the epicure. 

Rose Comb White Leghorns (Bonney's strain) 
— Difl'er from the ordinary White Leghorn only 
in comb, but are preferred by many who ad- 
mire a rose comb on such a bird, and also be- 
cause a rose comb is less liable to injury from 
frost and other occurrences. 

Brown Leghorns ( tVilliams and CrofTut's 
strain)— These Italian birds, so well and favor- 
ably known to all who keep poultry, are a 
strange contradiction of the accepted theory 
that the climate of their native country (and 
all similar climates) produces an habitual lan- 
guor or inactivity; for of all the breeds of 
fowls they are the most active and tireless, sel- 
dom still during the whole day, and shelling 
out an astonishing number of eggs in a year. 
There is no difi'erence in the laying qualities of 
the white, the black and the brown, end all are 
non-setters. 

Black Lsghorna (introduced in this country 



by Mr. Watson in 1871)— They have the same 
characteristics as their brothers and sisters, the 
whites and the browns, but are very scarce at 
present. 

Houdans (Todd's strain) — No wonder you ad- 
mire them, for they are the finest of the fine, 
and fear nothing on the show bench. They 
are very sociable, and " Dick," here, is the 
most affectionate fellow I ever saw. Although 
a native of France, it does not require a French 
cook to tell us that the Houdan ia one of the 
most delicately flavored of all domestic fowb. 
They are prolific layers, and mature early. 

Light IVahmas (Felch & Williams strains) — 
These pens are fine and cannot be equaled 
in Southern California ; now let me show you 
another pen of them. They are direct from the 
yards of Mr. Felch, and I think you will agree 
that Mr. Felch is justly proud of them when he 
says they are among his best. Of the hundreds 
of fanciers who have seen these Light Brahmas, 
none have failed to warmly praise them. It is 
well known that a multitude of fanciers regard 
the Light Brahma as the handsomest breed 
named in the " Standard of Excellence;" and 
more money changes hands each year for fine 
specimens than for birds of any other variety. 

Langshams (Croad's Strain) — Major Croad's 
importation from China in 1S72 has proved an 
important event, as the Langsham club and 
their friends will attest. Their glossy brown 
eggs are rich, and they give them to us in lib- 
eral quantity. Can you imagine a more beauti- 
ful sight than either of these yards of Lang- 
shams with theirmetallic greenifh-black plumage 
and bright red combs, ear lobes and wattles, 
their gentle, graceful carriage and symmetrical 
form ? Their size, small bones and juicy, tender 
flesh, recommend them for the table. 

Bantams — These little pets please the chil- 
dren, and have their admirers among the 
" children of a larger growth." They are 
pretty, afl'ectlonate and hardy, and will lay a 
greater weight of eggs for the amount of food 
consumed than many of the larger varieties. 

Bronze Turkeys — These noble specimens 
make one feel that Christmas and Thanksgiving 
Day should come weekly instead of annually; 
yet it would seem like treason to plot the death 
of those handsome birds. See that gobbler 
parading before his harem; is he not justly 
proud of his flock (and himself)? And look in 
the next yard — there is another with fan 
spread and feathers raised. He is taking a 
sun-bath and airing his vanity at the same 
time. A fine male specimen nf this breed will 
at maturity fatten to weigh 40 pounds. Is it 
economy for farmers to breed mongrels ? 

Pekin Ducks — Yes, they are noisy, but 'tis 
music to the ear of a breeder or poultryman. 
Duck-raising in this country is in its infancy, 
yet there are many at the business, and if prop- 
erly managed it is very profitable. The Pekin 
duck is a general favorite owing to its large 
size, good laying qualities and beauty of color 
and form. It is not generally known that 
these ducks can be successfully raised without 
water except for drinking, but such is the fact. 

Guipeas — They are scarce in Southern Cali- 
fornia, but poultry-raisers, who know that they 
keep awaj rats, scare ofl' hawks and are the best 
of sentinels, will have them at any cost. 

Common Fowls — Yes, they are kept on Mr. 
Bancroft's Helix farms in Spring Valley, where 
we also send the surplus fancy stock and where 
all the feed — grain and green — is raised, and 
where is also kept a fine stock of thoroughbred 
horses and cattle. " Is there plenty of room 
for large stock ?" Six hundred acres and every 
convenience. 

Yes, we have incubators in constant opera- 
tion, and will shortly give you an article on 
artificial incubation. C. Von Cclin', 

Manager Pablo Poultry Vards. 

f>an Diego. Cal. 



J0CRBORieUbTUR.E. 
Late or Early Planting. 

The question when trees or shrubbery is most 
profitably transplanted will, of course, be 
answered differently in different countries. 
Much depends upon the season or seasons; much, 
again, upon the quality of the stock and 
also of the cjuality of soil in which the trees 
are to be planted. The general idea is that 
evergreens should be planted late, indeed as late 
as possible in the spring. The re<)Son for this, 
we are told, is that evergreens make their fine, 
new roots just at that period, and that if they 
were dry before the trees would not sustain 
themselves until spring. 

This is partly right and partly wrong. Ever- 
greens, just like other trees, be^in to make root 
as soon as they are cut, be that in the fall or in 
the spring, provided only they have a chance to 
do so. As evergreens are growing, or at least 
circulating sap all the year round, it also fol- 
lows that their endeavors to make new roots 
are unceasing, it the location is favorable. Our 
ordinary winters are hardly ever severe enough 
to stop the growth of common evergreen trees, 
even if it is considerably retarded. If trans- 
planted to light, dry. and warm soil, new roots 
begin to form immediately. Every nurseryman 
knows that evergreens " balled " will root 
through the sack, even in December and Janu- 
ary — not waiting for the advent of spring and 
warm weather. But if the same evergreen, in- 
stead of being assigned a suitable place at once, 
is put in cold, heavy soil, undrained and uncon- 
genial, the chances are that the tre98 will suffer 



Jan. 15, 1887] 



and not be able to produce new roots until the 
warm weather makes the ground dryer and 
warmer. 

But what holds good in regard to evergreens 
is also applicable to deciduous trees and cut- 
tingSi The very moment a fruit tree is dug 
and again planted it commences first to heal 
the wounds made, and with the first advent of 
warm weather the new roots begin to shoot out. 
It is, therefore, very desirable that fruit and 
deciduous trees should be planted as soon after 
being cut as possible, provided the ground is 
suitably warm and drained. If, again, the soil 
is cold and wet, the trees are prevented from 
healing the wounds, and it is much better to 
delay the planting in such soils until warmer 
weather sets in or the ground becomes dryer, 
else the roots may decay and mold and the 
trees may die. But the great question is whe- 
ther such soils ever are suitable for fruit trees 
or whether they had not better be planted with 
something else. 

The same applies as well to grape-cuttings or 
cuttings of any kind. If the ground is warm 
and dry, the grape-cuttings had best be set out 
in the fall, as the " callous" is thus formed 
early, and the new roots will be ready to push 
with the first warm weather in spring. On 
wet and damp places, however, late planting is 
just as good, as the " callous" never forms if 
the ground is excessively wet. On the contra- 
ry, the butt ends are apt to sour or rot, which 
precludes any callous ever being formed. The 
orchardist generally delays planting too long, 
and hardly ever realizes the advantages of get- 
ting his orchard in as early as possible in the 
winter. 

In connection with this I will mention another 
point, which both bothers the nurseryman and 
injures the planter; the idea of some of the 
latter is that all the good trees are disposed of 
early, and the bad ones late. While this holds 
good as to varieties sometimes, it does not as 
regards size of trees. The orchardist, therefore, 
writes the nurseryman to dig his order and heel 
it in for him. He is not yet ready; will be so 
in one or two months, and will then write for 
his trees. It is an entirely mistaken idea that 
such proceeding will benefit any one, and I 
wish here to point out that it is decidedly to 
the disadvantage of the planter to have the 
nurseryman care for his trees, heeled in. If 
these trees or plants are heeled in and kept 
separate, after being dug, the roots will start 
almost immediately, and when afterward the 
order comes to ship the trees, they are re-dug, 
the young roots exposed to the air and dried, 
and the trees suflFer more or less. If the planter 
is not ready to plant his orchard when he 
orders his trees, he had better take them and 
care for them himself, heeling them in on a 
proper place. When he is ready, the trees can 
then be dug and immediately set out before the 
young roots have time to dry and spoil. I be- 
lieve by such a proceeding a crop may be had a 
year sooner. 

To sum up, I think trees and shrubbery 
should be planted as early as possible in the 
winter on dry and warm soil; on wet and cold 
soil they should be planted at the end of the 
winter. If the trees have already made new 
roots, it is of the greatest benefit to save them 
and prevent their drying. Gdstav Eisen. 

Fartcher Creek Niivcri/. Fresno. 



jSjHEEf AND C0COOL. 



Hints to Flock-Owners. 

Editors Press : — Assuming that the condi- 
tions under which sheep husbandry is conduct- 
ed on the Pacific Coast are not radically diflFer- 
ent from those which prevailed 14 years ago, 
when I was personally familiar with the busi- 
ness in the Salinas valley, I wish to oflfer the 
California flock- masters a few suggestions. 

The three most important points in the prac- 
tical management of the flock are lambing, 
winter care, and. working oS the culls and mut- 
ton sheep. "Take care of the pence and the 
pounds will take care of themselves," is an old 
and truthful saying. The main flock of mature 
sheep and the clip of wool are the pounds; the 
three items above mentioned are the pence. 

1. Lambing. — The lambs are the interest on 
the shepherd's capital, and it depends principally 
on himself whether he receives 75 per cent, 60 per 
cent or only 50. It is almost impossible to have 
a range ewe too fat, either at coupling or at 
parturition, because she has abundant exercise; 
but in a breeding flock, which is yarded, a ewe 
may become so loaded with fat as to be sterile, 
or at least produce a feeble and flaccid lamb. 
This applies to ewes which have reared lambs 
the preceding summer. There is always a consid- 
erable percentage that " miss " at service, or for 
some reason fail to bear or rear lambs, and 
these are apt to get so fat before the coupling 
season comes again — passing their heat so many 
times fruitlessly — that they will be barren un- 
less they are separated into a flock by them- 
selves and their condition reduced a little be- 
fore service. 

Service should be so timed as not to have 
lambing come on before the heaviest spring 
rains are over. In case the flock-master is ac- 
customed to go into the mountains for the sum- 
mer, there is a great temptation to him to get 
lambing and shearing out of the way early, be- 
fore the flocks start for the summit; but this 
may be overdone. During the long cold rains 
of February aod March, in the Sierra foothills 



fACIFie I^U 



and mesas, I have seen from one to three young 
lambs lying dead close around the trunk of 
many a tree, and from one to six freshly shorn 
sheep, in a heap, in almost every ravine or lit- 
tle depression in the mesa, stiff and cold, where 
they had crouched together to escape the wind. 
Itis worse than useless to bring onlambing before 
there is a sufficienoy of green feed. Green feed 
makes milk, and milk makes the mother. 
Without a good supply of milk in her udder, 
the ewe is very apt to disown her lamb, and 
then all is lost. 

If the ewes could receive a little grain a 
month before lambing, this would enable them 
to pass through the ordeal earlier and on a 
more scanty suppl.y of grass than if the latter 
were the sole dependence. This grain feed 
need not exceed six or eight ounces to the head, 
and should be scattered in little piles on the 
ground. (This is better than troughs, where 
there is a bard, smooth surface, not sandy or 
muddy, as it permits each to get an equal 
share.) 

With many flock-masters it seems to be a 
difficult matter to strike an even balance be- 
tween loss of sheep and cost of feed. We will 
suppose that S500 worth of feed would prevent 
the loss of .§500 worth of ewes and lambs. A 
good many flock-owners seem to argue, judging 
from their actions, that if it will do uo more 
than that, it is not worth the trouble; over- 
looking the very important fact that that 
amount of feed would probably save .?500 addi- 
tional in preventing loss of condition, light 
fleeces, "jointed" fiber, stunted lambs, des- 
tined, in ail probability, to succumb the follow- 
ing winter, even if they survive this, etc. 

It is a great mistake to scamp the work of 
lambing by reducing the force of help. It is easy 
enough to lose in a day enough lambs to pay a 
man's wages for a month. The point of great- 
est importance is, to keep each ewe and lamb to- 
gether and at the same time work them home- 
ward to the corral. If a ewe, especially a young 
ewe, loses sight aud scent of her lamb for an 
hour, the probability is strong that she will 
never recognize it again. If the number of 
helpers is too small, the lagging ewes with very 
young lambs at heel will be crowded and beaten 
along, and confusion will reign supreme. There 
ought to be enough men assisting the regular 
herder so that one may start out from the flock 
toward the corral with an installment of ewes and 
lambs every three or four hours through the 
day. 

On stormy days there ought to be especial 
vigilance and activity in camp, for on a stormy 
day look out for a shower of lambs. It is un- 
fortunate to be compelled to drive, huddled to- 
gether, a large number of ewes and young lambs 
in the rain, for the rain and the rubbing together 
are apt to obscure or obliterate the scent by 
which alone the ewe recognizes her own. 

The second point — winter care — has been 
partly treated already. I once saw, within 
sight of the dome of the State Capitol, a farmer 
build a furnace and boil up the carcasses of his 
sheep for hogs — sheep which had perished in 
winter, but most of which might have been 
saved by the wheat straw that he burned in 
the fall ! The average California flf<ck-master 
may smile incredulously at this, but the writer 
knows whereof he affirms, for he has, even in 
the rigorous winter of Ohio, carried a flock of 
225 wethers through in good condition on wheat 
straw and corn alone, and shorn excellent 
fleeces from them — fleeces above the average ot 
the entire lot of sheep; and Ohio straw, bleached 
and weatherbeaten, is much less valuable for 
feed than the bright yellow straw of Cilifornia. 
The chaff is especially valuable. If straw was 
properly stacked to shed rain, and the parts of 
it richest in chaff given to sheep in board-racks, 
they could be kept thriving through the winter 
on a feed of six ounces of barley per head daily, 
for grown sheep. 

As for shelter, I do not recommend straw 
sheds, such as might be made for the small 
flocks of Eastern larms. Unless the straw is 
piled very deep on the roof, they are a nuisance, 
except it might be as mere wind-breaks, with 
out a pretense of a roof. Unless the shepherd 
has a long purse or a short flock, so that he can 
afi^ord to protect his sheep with board sheds, 
the best thing he can do is to furnish the 
herder a gum coat and keep the flock moving 
in a long, cold rain. But barracks ought to be 
built if possible. 

I speak of wheat straw because it is so abun- 
dant on the Pacific Coast and so generally 
wasted. Probably the flock-master would 
think he could not afford to give hay to range 
sheep, but it is quite possible that he may be 
mistaken in this view, especially where wild 
hay can be harvested in quantities. 

3. There is a delusive saying in Texas and 
California: "Old sheep for mutton." This 
has arisen from the fact that, in regions remote 
from a market and sparsely settled, there was 
so little demand for mutton that the flock- 
master found it profitable to keep his 
wethers, generally, until they died of old 
age, and the ewes until they died of lamb- 
bearing. But this is certainly an error. The in- 
teresting and valuable experiments made on the 
Sweet Bros, flocks, at Pompey, N. Y., in the 
years 1861-.3, show that wethers continue 
to increase (after the first year) in their per- 
centage of wool up to their fifth year; 
ewes the same; but after the fifth year 
they decline. That is to say, a sheep of 
either sex has reached its highest value for 
wool and (mature) mutton at the age of five 
years; then it enters on the down grade. A 
sheep five years old or over will consume more 
feed than a young one, but is less profitable, 



RAlo jp RESS. 



because it yields a lower percentage of wool, 
though the fleece may weigh absolutely more. 
Now, the proposition I lay down is this: If a 
wether that has passed his climax, or a super- 
annuated ewe, fattened cheaply on grass, will 
fetch anything above the cost of transporta- 
tion, it is better to sell them and till their 
places with lambs. 

A flock of muttons should be allowed to re- 
tain their fleeces in the fall for protection. Then 
when well fed out, if driven by easy stages to a 
railroad station and fed on alfalfa, hay and 
grain for a few weeks, to remove from the flesh 
the wild gamy flavor of the black sage and 
other shrubs, and then shipped on double-deck 
cars to the best available market, in judicious 
installments, they will seldom fail to bring a 
profitable price. Wild range mutton "kills 
red," as the butchers say, and it also " cooks 
red," does not brown nicely in the oven. It re- 
quires a few weeks' feeding on good hay and 
grain to impart to it the juicy flavor and brown 
color, when cooked, which are the delight of 
the gourmet. Stephen Powers. 

Wash. Co., Ohio. 



The Mohair Market. 

Editors Pres.s :— Fall mohair is now coming 
in freely, and we take pleasure in giving you 
our opinion of the domestic clip in general. 
We have always been opposed to a second 
shearing, but so many excellent breeders, long 
experienced in the business, claim its advan- 
tages, and the handsome condition of this fall's 
clip, has induced us to modify our views very 
materially. There is one very serious draw- 
back, however, and that is that in sorting the 
fall clip yields a very large proportion of mohair 
too short to comb. No matter how fine, silky 
or lustrous this may be, it is only carding 
stock and must be sold as such. This brings 
down the average value of the clip, even when 
it is a very choice one. Growers should try 
and keep their mohair free from alkali, which 
seems to destroy the natural oil which gives the 
fleece its luster. 

The market is still in a depressed condition. 
We should be pleased to report it more favor- 
ably, but have to state the true facts. The de- 
mand is very sluggish and prices continue low. 
We look for a better sale after the new year, 
but cannot reasonably expect any advance. The 
course of the foreign market, which so many 
growers confound with our own, has been as 
follows since June, 18S.3 : Values increased 
gradually from then till January, 1880, when 
there was a marked decline. The dullness and 
low prices continued till June, when there 
was a sudden and still greater decline. 

At ihis time Eoglish manufacturers were 
heavily stocked and there was no demand in 
their market for Turkey and Cape mohair. 
This caused the drop and our American manu- 
facturers sent large orders abroad and refused 
to receive on consignment or buy domestic mo- 
hair. They cared nothing for an American in- 
dustry in which they claimed to have a great 
interest, but they simply wanted to get cheap, 
raw stock. We did not join in this movement 
at any time, and did all we could to sustain our 
home market. It is a curious feature that 
while English manufacturers were heavily 
stocked and their market very dull, that they 
went to Turkey and the Cape and tried to raise 
a boom there. The English market felt the 
effects of this about October, but it soon passed 
over, and there it is reported as being very 
quiet and prices weak. 

For choice fine, 36 cents is full value to-day. 
Good average combing will bring only 34 cents, 
and fair average will not command m.ore than 
30 cents. Carding stock is slow sale, from 15 
up to 25 cents for very clean, bright lots. We 
see no reason or possibility of values going 
lower. Wm. MacNadghtan's Sons. 

Nem York. 



CDETEOF^ObOGieAls. 



Pacific Coast Records to Dec. 31, 1886. 

The Signal Service has prepared a summary 
of the weather reports during the past year, 
showing the total rainfall and giving figures for 
comparison with past years. Tnis sum- 
mary shows that less rain has fallen this year 
than has fallen, on an average, in previous 
years, and considerably less than fell last 
year. 

The following is the summary and review for 
the month of December relating to rainfall and 
temperature : 

Rainfall — The Northern California boundary 
line is coincident with the zone of December 
normal precipitation, south of which the rain 
has been below the average, being about three 
inches in a belt parallel to and near the coast, 
two inches in a belt passing down the great 
California valley, and one inch down the Sierra 
Nevada range. In Western Washington Ter- 
ritory and Northwestern Oregon the excess 
above the average is four inches, thence south 
to the California line it gradually diminishes 
to the normal. 

Seasonal Rainfall — But slight departures have 
occurred in Oregon and Washington Territory, 
except in the Willamette valley, where the 
defiQiency at Portland is about six inches. la 



California the deficiency throughout the State 
is noteworthy. In Sacramento valley the pre- 
cipitation is from about three to five inches be- 
low the average; in San Joaquin valley from one 
to three inches; in the Santa Clara and Salinas 
valley from one to four inches, and in the south- 
ern portion of the State about three inches be- 
low. The rain has, however, fallen in gentle 
showers with an absence of downpours, so that 
the whole of the rain has penetrated the soil. 

Rain was generally prevalent in Washington 
Territory and Oregon during the month. In 
California rain fell to the central portion of the 
State in considerable showers the 7th, 8th and 
9th, 29th and .30th. Light showers occurred in 
the extreme northern portion, with sprinkles as 
far south as San Francisco and Sacramento, the 
11th, 15th and 16th, 22d and 23d. Rain oc- 
curred in Southern California the 9th, 29th and 
30th. 

Temperature — The mean temperature has 
been normal only at San Diego; elsewhere 
throughout the Pacific Coast it has been above 
it. The line of one degree in excess skirts the 
coast from San Francisco to Los Angeles; the 
line of two degrees passes parallel to the former 
and through Sacramento; of three degrees 
through Red Bluff down the Sierra Nevada 
range "to Yuma; of four degrees from Shasta 
southeastward; the line of five degrees passes 
from Winnemucca, inclosing northeastern Cali- 
fornia through Roseburg, Portland and 
Olympia; north and east of this the excess is 
still greater. 

General Weather Features — A number of cy- 
clonic areas appeared off the Washington Terri- 
tory coast, but invariably passed eastward and 
failed to move down the coast, their influence 
seldom passing as far south as the extreme 
northern portion of California. 

The following table shows the rainfall at 
some of the principal towns on the coast from 
Puget Sound to Yuma. The figures in the sec- 
ond column give the average of the rainfall for 
places set forth in the first column. The third 
column gives the total rainfall from July 1st to 
December 31, 1886. The last column gives the 
total rainfall from July 1st to December 31, 
1885: 







H 


H 






S 






p 3 


r p. 


H. 


STATIONS. 


CO 


CO 






°° 1-1 






o 


' a> 
n 


" O- 
p 


Tatoosh Island 


44.31 




36.70 


Port Angeles 


12.76 


14 06 


12.96 


Olympia 


27-37 


24.02 


23-53 


I' ort Can by 


26.81 




31.53 


Spokane ¥aX\s 






8 q8 


Walla Walla 


7-15 




4.84 


Astoria 


33 98 




30.04 


Portland 


22.75 


16.91 


20.09 


Roseburg 


14.62 


15-89 


16 71 


P'ort Bidwell 


7-37 


7.07 


13-17 


Boise Citv 


5-02 


3 99 


4-43 


Winnemucca 


• 3-43 


3-93 


4-97 


(;ape Mendocino 


8.09 




13-89 


Delta 


22.23 


9 41 


42.92 




13.18 


6-45 


20.90 


Red Bluff R. R 


11.04 


6-45 


24-27 


Red Bluff Signal Station . 


11.04 


5-96 


23-97 


Tehama 


. 6.3s 


2.78 


13 90 


( 'orning 


4 60 


2.31 


15-86 




12.21 


2-95 


3-67 




. 7-89 


3-90 


14.98 


Nord 




3-39 


16. 60 


Orland 


6,61 


2.27 


12.46 


Willows 


. 484 


i-5t 


11.25 


Marysville 


6.47 


2-93 


12.1« 


Emigrant Gap 


14.06 


8.86 


22.90 




15.84 


5.00 


14 27 




. 15-15 


6.58 


22.87 




11.49 


7-03 


19 93 




6.83 


4-44 


13-31 


Dunnigan '. . 


- 5-64 


2.42 


15-72 




5-77 


1.29 


12.95 


Knight's Landing 


. 5-64 


1-83 


12.93 


Davisville 


6.26 


2.29 


14-45 




II. 12 


5-54 


21.18 




7 10 


3-74 


13-52 




7.62 


3-09 


17.20 


Brighton 


• 4-53 


2-44 


10. 10 




8.00 


2-51 


15.08 




- 5 II 


3-07 


12.67 


Martinez 


- 5 63 


2.87 


12.40 




■ 3 99 


1,42 


7.06 




- 6.35 


9.04 


13 59 




4.81 


1.72 


7-47 




• 9-32 


4-63 


17.66 




6.41 


3-48 


9 37 




5-II 


2.76 


8.50 


San Jose 


• 3-93 


1.96 


9.56 




. 8.52 


4-09 


13 40 




- 4-67 


3-5U 


14-83 




. 6.49 


2.20 


9.22 




2.88 


1.60 


9.62 


IVcsno 


. 3-07 


1-44 


9.88 






1. 19 








1.63 


7-35 


HoUister 


■ 3 93 


'.34 


6 30 




- 2 93 


2.24 


7-7' 




4.88 


2.08 


8.46 


Pajaro 


• 6.35 


2.69 


12 17 


Soledad 


. 2.51 


1. 19 


7-44 




- 2.74 


1-34 


5-72 


Hanford 


4.26 


i-'5 


4-34 




1.88 


I.IO 


4 95 




. 1.79 


1.03 


5- IS 




. 3,01 


2.78 


5-75 




• 3-73 


3-48 


4-53 




. 3-36 


1-45 


4-64 


Los ./Vngeles 


• .5-69 


2.09 


7-55 




- 3-99 


1. 10 


2.71 




. 1.47 


3-57 


2-57 




1.04 


•31 


1-37 



Salt Artesian Water. — An artesian well 
being sunk at White Plains, Nev., is down over 
2.300 feet, and can go no further until the 
water, which is 17 per cent salt, and so heavy 
that the ropes and tools float on it and the drill 
does not penetrate the rock, is shut out, 



44 



fACIFie f^URAlo fRESS, 



[Jan. 15, 1887 



JpATF^ONS OF ^USB/cNDRY. 

CorrespotKlencc on Grange principles and work and re- 
ports of transactions of subordinate Orans^es are respect- 
fully solicited for this department. 



The Grangers' Installation at Haywards. 

The joint meeting of Eden and Temeacal 
Granges at Haywards, on Saturday last, was 
a very enjoyable affair. Haywards is about 16 
miles from Oakland, and the ride between the 
two places, on Saturday last, was indeed a 
charming one to all who had the pleasure of 
enjoying it. Worthy Lecturer Flint was prompt- 
ly on hand to aid and encourage the goodly 
number of Patrons present. Brothers Webster, 
Deming and Baldwin (of Danville Grange), 
with their wives, were also in attendance. 

Kden Grange was opened in ample form by 
Worthy Master Perham. By request, Bro. Flint 
instructed a class of seven sisters and three 
brothers in the third and fourth degrees. The 
conferring of the degrees of Matron and Hus- 
bandman on these young ladies and men marks 
an encouraging day for Kden Grange. In thus 
joining the ranks of our noble Order, we have 
no doubt that many of them will find that they 
have taken a more important and wiser step 
than they have dreamed of with the fraternal 
friendship of the great brotherhood in their 
favor. We heartily wish them all success in 
their relations with our Order and with all 
their worthy undertaking. 

We congratulate the ladies of Eden Grange, 
for they decorated -the long tables of the Har- 
vest Feast very handsomely, with rare flowers 
tastefully arranged with tempting food, and the 
sentiments, expressed in a friendly and lively 
way, were exceedingly enjoyed. Brother 
Chester, State Secretary, Brothers Blackwood, 
Anway, Dennis, Baldwin, Deming, Webster, 
Goodenough, Dewey and others co-operated in 
saying many pleasant things. 

After Harvest Feast, Brother Flint, assisted 
by Brother Webster, duly installed the officers 
of both Granges, and the inspiring remarks and 
faithful pledges given by each officer received 
a warm response from the heart of every true 
Granger present. The graceful, easy and 
homelike manner in which the installing exer- 
cises were conducted by the oflieers, and par- 
ticipated in by those installed, made it a very de- 
lightful occasion, long to be remembered . The 
method of joining together in such installing 
ceremonies proves an exceedingly fortunate one. 
Brother Perham, the retiring Master of Eden 
Grange, has served his fellow-Patrons ably, 
faithfully and very acceptably the second term 
in that office, as well as many years in other re- 
sponsible stations. 

Brother Chester assumes the gavel with im- 
proved prospects of the Grange for the future, 
and will have a hearty support of the active, 
faithful members before the year rolls round, 
it is hoped that Kden Grange will have two 
more neighbors, respectively at Centerville and 
Livermore, in Alameda county. As a elight 
recognition of the long and faithful services of 
Sister Babcock as Secretary of Temescal Grange 
for seven consecutive years, and Sister Sharai, 
Secretary of Kden Grange for nine years, 
Brother Dewey presented, as a slight token 
of appreciation on the part of their respective 
Granges, handsomely bound volumes of the 
" Life of Mother Bickerdyke," written by a 
talented daughter of California. The work 
of that noble woman, like that of these worthy 
secretaries, is worthy of all praise. 

It is seldom that the Master of any Grange 
serves long enough to do so much real praise- 
worthy work for the Order as such modest and 
faithful servants as these two secretaries. We 
can further say that they are only two of many 
who work on quietly, year after year, their own 
consciousness of doing good being their greatest 
reward. 

Brother Russell, we are glad to learn, is im- 
proving in health. He was unavoidably ab- 
sent on this occasion. We were sorry to miss 
some other good Grangers, whom we know 
would have been present, if possible, and 
would have enjoyed the occasion as only good 
and liberal Patrons can do.' 



Grangers' Bank. 

Albert Montpellier, cashier and manager of 
the Grangers' Bank of California, has issued a 
notice to the stockholders, informing them that 
the Board of Directors, at their regular meeting 
held Jan. 11th, declared a dividend (the 12th) 
of S4 per share, payable immediately — equal to 
about seven per cent per annum free from tax — 
the same amounting to .?42,000, and ordered 
carried over SlU,r-00 to the reserve fund, the net 
profits of the bank for the year 1S86 being ?5.'),- 
500, equal to 9J per cent on the capital paid up, 
making the total amount of dividends paid in 
cash to the atockbolders, since its organization 
in 1S74, $465,000. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of 
the bank was held in the afternoon of the same 
day and the old Board of Directors was unani- 
mously re-elected. Officers and management 
remain the same as before. 



GiiANOE Social. — The young people of Mar- 
tinez and neighboring towns will be pleased to 
learn that the next (irange social will come off 
Saturday evening, .Tan. loth. This date has 
been fixed upon in order to take advantage of 
moonlight, which will be fully appreciated by 
those coming from a distance.— (?aze«e. 



Mortimer Whitehead, 

Brother Mortimer Whitehead, Worthy Lect- 
urer of the National Grange, enjoys a national 
reputation as an early worker in the Grange 
cause, and one of the builders of our Order. 
And through his weekly notes of " Grange 
Work and Progress," this winter, he has been 
growing so like an old acquaintance to our read- 
ers that we are sure they will be glad to learn 
more about him, and know how he looks. We 
have therefore taken pains to secure the excel- 
lent likeness which we now have the pleasure 
of presenting, together with an interesting biog- 
raphy, for which latter we are mainly indebted 
to the National Farm and Fireside. 

He was born October 9, 1841, and belongs to 
one of the oldest families in the State of New 
Jersey. His ancestors, on both father's and 
mother's side, were among the patriots of the 
Revolution; even the women of the family par- 
took of the "Spirit of '76." At the battle of 
Monmouth — fought on an extremely hot day in 
June — Aunt Peggy Whitehead was one of the 
women who carried water out to the soldiers on 
the field all day. And when the town (now 
city) of Elizabeth was threatened by the enemy. 
Aunt Rachel Whitehead helped roll the barrels 
of flour from the warehouses, to get it to 
safer (juarters. The broad Anglo-Saxon name 
traces back across the water to one Master 
Whitehead, who was chaplain to Queens Anne 



Boleyn and Elizabeth. His mother comes from I 
the Huguenots, who, because of their persecu- | 
tions, love of liberty, and desire to worship 
God after the dictates of their own conscienzes, 
were among the earliest settlers of this country. 
On his mother's side, as we have stated, the 
family were active in the battle of freedom. 
Gen. Heath (his mother's maiden name) was 
one of Washington's most trusted generals, 
particularly in the campaigns through the " Jer- 
seys." 

Bro. Whitehead received a good education, 
mainly at Paulding and Oak Hill institutes, on 
the Hudson river. While not yet of age, from 
his father's farm he enlisted in the Twenty- 
sixth New Jersey Volunteers, and passed 
through some of the severest battles of the war 
with the Army of the Potomac, being of Gen. 
Sedgwick's famous Sixth Army Corps, and 
serving under Generals McClellan, Burnside, 
Hooker and Meade. At the close of the war 
he deliberately took up agriculture as his 
profession, purchasing a farm of 106 acres, 
which he has owned ever since, and upon which 
he is now living, at Middlebush, Somerset 
Co., N. .1. Progressive farming alone suited 
him, and he glories in the name of "book- 
farmer," and was active in farmers' clubs and a 
director in the County Agricultural Society at 
an early age. Like thousands of others, he was 
all ready for the Grange when it came, and 
went into it with his wliole heart and strength. 
Himself and wife were charter members of the 
first Grange organized in New Jersey — Pioneer, 
No. 1 — as far back as 1871, when there were 
hardly 100 altogether in the United States. Of 
this Grange he was first Lecturer. He soon 
after helped organize a Grange nearer home — 
Somerset, No. 7— and was elected its first 
Master; was made a general deputy, and helped 
organize (Tranges in several counties of the 
State. At the organization of the State Grange 
he was elected a member of the executive com- 



mittee, and one year later Master of the State 
Grange, making his first appearance in the 
National Grange at Charleston, S. C, being 
the youngest Master of a State Grange. At 
the Louisville session of the National Grange 
he was elected Assistant Steward, and served 
two years, followed by his election at the Cin- 
cinnati session to the office of Lecturer. At 
the 19th annual session of the National 
Grange, at Boston, November, 1S85, he was 
again honored with the office of Lecturer. He 
was also elected and is serving as Lecturer of 
the New Jersey State Grange for the third 
time. Of his powers and success as a lecturer 
it is not necessary for us to speak; he is too 
well known, having lectured in nearly all the 
States of the Union, and has the honor up to this 
time of delivering more public and private 
lectures than any other member of the Order, 
amounting in all to 3597, to do which vast 
amount of work he has traveled in distance 
nearly 10 times around the earth. He is a nat- 
ural orator, and his earnest and eloquent efforts, 
listened to by hundreds of thousands, have been 
of vast benefit in building up the Order, and his 
labors are duly appreciated. For over nine years 
he was one of the editors of the Am rican 
Orange. Bulletin, but is now upon the staff of 
the Farmers' Friend, of Mechanicsburg, Penn., 
and his vigorous pen is used as effectively from 
week to week in its columns, in battling for 
the rights and interests of farmers, as are his 
words upon the platform. The heavy, constant 
la'oors of over ].'! years in the field told upon 
Mr. Whitehead's health, and he was forced to 
recruit his weakened throat aud lungs by rest 



I from speaking, devoting his time more closely 
I to editorial work, and to conducting Fruit- 
vale as an experimental farm. He has broken 
loose again of late and is heard from in no un- 
certain sound against monopoly and for the 
right. 

Brother Whitehead has four children — three 
boys and one girl — and that he may long be 
spared to our Order and his country, we know, 
is the sincere wish of his 10,000 friends. We 
can only wish the Grange had 1000 more like 
him. "They are needed. 



Grange Items. — We note in the Patron 
that Wheatland had a goodly attendance and 
fine time at installation New Year's day, with 
visitors from North Butte, South Sutter and 
Yuba City .... Lafayntte Yates, of Elsinore, is 
endeavoring to found a Grange in that part of 
S»n Diego connty . . . .The revived Sierra Valley 
Grange has 17 charter members — seven brothers 
and 10 sisters. . . .Elk Grove's officers were in- 
stalled by W. M., Johnston, assisted by C. A. 
Hull, W. M. of Sac. Pomona Grange. A num- 
ber of guests, not members of the Order, were 
present by invitation, and evidently enjoyed 
both dinner and installation. 



Installations. — The officers of Sacramento 
Pomona Grange, a list of whom we published 
at Christmas, were duly installed last Satur- 
day at Granger hall, Sacramento, by W. M., 
Wm. Johnston, assisted by Sister Jones, of 
Yuba City Grange. 

Lodiand Woodbridge Granges had a joint in- 
stallation at the hall of the former on Wednes- 
day of last week. The ceremonies were con- 
ducted by D. Flint, W. L. S. G., assisted by 
W. L. Overhiser, W. O. S. O. 

Corrected. — Among our "Grange Elections" 
may be found a corrected list of the officers 
whom Eoterprise installs tOtday, 



Grange Work and Progress. 

[Prepared Weekly by M. WuiTniiKAr, National Lecturer.] 

Hon. Norman J. Colman, V. S. Commissioner of 
Agriculture, has issued a circular requestinj; the 
Lecturer of the National Grange and the various 
.Slate and Territorial Granges to forward to him the 
name and postoffice address of the Master, Lecturer 
and Secretaries of the I'omonaand District Granges, 
with the view of fostering and perpetuating a hearty 
co-operation for the promotion of the agricultural in- 
terests of the nation. A similar circular will 1>; is- 
sued to the secretaries of Farmers' Clubs and other 
purely agricultural associations. It is to be hoped 
that the ofhcers of the Granges referred to will all 
act promptly in the matter. Each neglect of duty 
not only deprives the one Grange of its benefits, but 
weakens our general power for good. We must act 
together. 

The reports that have been coming in from the 
annual meetings of the Stale Gi^nges in December 
are full of encouragement. A few items plainly tell 
of the rising tide all along our lines. 

Mississippi.— F^ut. Harden, \V. M. N. G., and M. 
S. (}., writes; " I have just returned from a most 
successful and profitable meeting of the State 
Grange." 

Minnesota.— \V. S. Choen, M. S. G., writes: 
" The work is beginning to look up in this State. 
Had a very harmonious meeting of the State 
Grange, and I think accomplished more work that 
will result in good to the Order than fo.- a number of 
years." 

Vermont. — Alpha Messer, M. S. G.; "We had 
the largest and l>est meeting of the .State Grange 
that has been held for several years. The utmost 
harmony prevailed, and the enthusiasm and deter- 
mination of the members to push the work was a 
surprise to the members themselves." 

Kentucky. — ]. D. Clardy, M. S. (1.: "Just closed 
one of the best meetings of our State Grange 
we have had for several years. We hope to have 
a general revival during the year." 

Maine. — Eleven new Granges during the past 
year. Total membership, 15,059; iioo new mem- 
bers; net gain, 628. 

Pennsylvania. — Eighteen new Granges between 
sessions of State Grange, 1885 and 1886; 1726 new 
members; net gain, 994; jiooo appropriated for 
lecture work for 1887. 

(Connecticut. — Eighteen new Granges during the 
year. Increase in membership nearly 150 per cent, 
j. H. Hale, M. .S. G., says: "There is an increas- 
ing interest and love for the Order in nearly all of the 
older Granges, and a growing respect and confidence 
for the Grange and its work by ail good citizens." 

Michigan. — Nine new Granges. A large and prof- 
itable State Grange meets in capitol building at 
I..ansing. 

New Hampshire. — Nine new Granges; total mem- 
bership, 5300: net gain, 561. "The Grange in 
New Hampshire h.as realized a year of great prosper- 
ity numerically, financially and educationally, and it 
is increasing in popularity each year in the minds and 
hearts of the people of every class and profession." 

Wisconsin. — S. C. Carr, M. .S. G. : "Our State 
Grange closed on the evening of the i6th. We had 
a good attendance. The Governor of the State gave 
us a rousing reception. All went home happy, feel- 
ing that the Order was on an upw.ard and onward 
course." 

Massachusetts. — James Draper, M. S. G. , says: 
' ' We rejoice in a prosperous year with a gain of two 
Granges and 143 in membership." 

lJ.-laware. — Henry Thompson, P. M. S. G. : 
" We closed a very successlul session of the Slate 
Grange yesterday. The city papers gave us free re- 
ports and liberal editorial notices. I feel the Order 
has received a boom it will feel for a long time." 

low'a. — J. E. Blackford, M. S. (',., says, after the 
meeting of the State Grange: " Prospects encourag- 
ing." 

Indian.a.— Milton Trusler, M. S. G.: "The i6th 
annual session of the Indiana State Grange was the 
best ever held in the State. Citizens of Frankfort 
and Patrons of county gave us a hearty welcome in 
public reception. The Ma.sons, Odd I'ellows and 
other benevolent orders furnished their beautiful 
halls free for our private meetings; the press, eager 
for all news, publishing Master's address in full, 
sending it broadcast over the State and recommend- 
ing it to be read by all. We are growing stronger 
in the minds of the people and the leaven is at work." 
" We are plowing and sowing and reaping, 
All over America's land." 



Grange Eleotlons.* 

Enterpbi.sk Grange. — Dec. 11 : W. A. 
Birch, M.; E. J. Lynch, 0.; Zenos L. Coy, L.; 
A. M. Gunter, S.; Ulysses Wilson, A. S.; 
Thomas Waite, C; Mrs. S. C. Coy, T.; Miss 
Letitia Hanlon, Sec; A. A. Krnll, G. K.; Miss 
Edith Tibbitts, Ceres; Miss Cerita Wilson, F. ; 
Miss Minnie Schutze, P.; Miss Etta Plummer, 
L. A. S. 

Florin Grange. — .Tan. 1 : John Reese, M.; 
D. H. Buell, 0.; Sister L A. Casey, L.; David 
Reese, S. ; Wm. Johnston, A. S. ; Sister H. A. 
Anderson, C; C. Towie, T.; L. H. Fassett, 
Sec ; J. Jackson, G. K. : Mary Donovan, P.; 
Lillie Casey, F.; Mamie Brown, Ceres; Aunie 
Donovan, L. A. S. 

Sierra Valley. — Dec. 2S : Geo. P. Haines, 
M.; A. E. Knerr, O.; B. F. Lemmon, L.; Mrs. 
Geo. P. Haines, S.; Mrs. Mary Lemmon, A. 
8.; J. Hubbard, C; Mrs. J. B. Albee, T.; N. 
N. Strang, Sec; Hal Lemmon, G. K.; Mrs. G. 
.1. Johnson, Ceres; Miss Leora Robbins, P.; 
Mrs. J. N. Phipps, F.; Mrs. N. N. Sl;rang, L. 
A. S. 

WiiEATLANn Grange. — Dpc. 4 (installed 
Jan. I): Hugh Morrison, M. ; Julius HoUister, 
0.; Frank Kirshner, L. ; Samuel Kuster, S. ; 
Abner Hollingshead, A. S.; Mrs. L. W. Hamil- 
ton, C; Mrs. Lou Eraser, T ; I. W. Huffaker, 
Sec; Michael Horner, G. K.; Mrs. L. Huff- 
aker, P.; Miss Mary I. Ostrom, F.; Mi»B 
Fannie C. Dam, Ceres ; Miss Lizzie Oikley, L. 
A. S. ; Miss Rosa Oatrom, Org. 

'Secretaries, or otiier officers, are invited to acnci us 
lints of officers elected, date of inatallations, and a|| 
Other iotcreKtini; matter (or publication. 




MORTIMER WHITEHEAD. LECTURER N. G., P. OP H. 



Jan. 15, 1887.] 



f ACIFie [^URAb f RESS, 



Grangers' Business Association. 

The Sacramento Grangers' Co-operative Busi- 
ness Association held their annual meeting in 
Grangers' Hall at Sacramento, Jan. 11th. Ac- 
cording to the report in the Record- Union, the 
Directors of the past year were re-elected, as fol- 
lows: Daniel FHnt, N. Mertes, Henry Fassett, 
G. W. Hancock, Erskine Greer, Chas. A. Hull, 
A. M. Plummer, Geo. Rich and Wm. Johnston. 
The Directors organized by choosing Wm. John- 
ston, Presi8ent — a position he has held for five 
consecutive terms; Charles A. Hull, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Erskine Greer, Secretary; Henry Fassett, 
Treasurer; and Daniel Flint, Auditor. The 
Association commenced business in 1877 on a 
capital of $2400, which has been increased to 
$75,000. It has a paid-up capital of §30,000, 
and is incorporated for $50,000. Their brick 
building, 80x100 feet, three stories in hight, is 
one of the finest structures in the city. The 
stockholders are all farmers. 



Good Words for St Helena. — The Star 
was a delighted guest at the New Year's Grange 
doings, of which Secretary Peterson gave us a 
brief report last week, and thus voices his ap- 
preciation: At 12 o'clock a Harvest Feast was 
spread in the lower hall, to which we were hon- 
ored with an invitation. Of course we were 
there, and it goes without saying that we were 
kindly entertained and treated to an incompara- 
bly good feast. In fact, every time we partake 
of a " Grange dinner " we are ready to assert it 
the best we ever had. But paramount to the 
good dinner, which an editor always enjoys, is 
the pleasure of association and conversation 
with the hospitable members of this Grange, 
who have the art of entertaining down to a sci- 
ence, and with whom one always feels at home. 
At 2 o'clock the ladies of the Grange held their 
New Year's reception, and thither we were 
drawn again, in company with three other gen- 
tleman callers. We found their hall upstairs 
beautifully decorated for the occasion. On one 
side, in evergreen letters, appeared the motto, 
" Esto Perpeiua," on another the dates 1807 and 
1887, together with the names of the seven 
illustrious founders of the Order. All callers 
were hospitably entertained and invited to par- 
take of appetizing refreshments. During the 
afternoon 47 ladies and gentlemen called, attest- 
ing the popularity of the good people of the 
Grange. St. Helena Grange is in a prosperous 
condition, numbering nearly 50 members, and 
receiving new accessions to its ranks every few 
weeks. Its membership is from among our best 
people, and we sincerely wish that it may con- 
tinue to prosper as it richly deserves. 



Tlie Fruit Union Meeting. 

Fruit-growers should not forget the meeting 
of the California Fruit Onion, which will be 
held at Irving hall, in this city, beginning 
Wednesday, January 19th, at 1 o'clock i>. m. 
It is intended to be a general meeting of fruit- 
growers, for President Hatch, in his circular 
which we printed last week, said: 

The attendance of all is desired, whether 
members of the Fruit Union, of any other 
Union or association, or of none, as the nearer 
we can all come to working in harmony, that 
much nearer will we be to success. The mat- 
ter of changing the existing by-laws can, of 
coarse, only be done by the vote of those en- 
titled to a voice in the meeting. 



The Lane Lectures are popular lectures on 
medical and hygienic subjects, given at the 
Cooper Medical College, in this city. The fifth 
course was opened on the 7th instant by Prof. 
L. C. Lane, who addressed a good audience on 
" Vaccination." The remainder will be {:;iven 
on the first and third Fridays of the months, as 
followB : Jan. Slat, Prof. C. Cushing. " Wa- 
ter ;" Feb, 4th, Prof. A. Barkan, " Our Noses ;" 
Feb. 18th, Prof. J. H.Wythe, "Heredity;" 
March 4th, Prof. C. N. EUinwood, " Medical 
Hints in Emergency Cases ;" March 18th, Prof. 
C. H. Steele, " Alcohol ;" April Ist, Prof. J. 
O. Hirschfelder, "The Skin;" April 15th, Dr. 
W. S. Whitwell, "The Opium Habit;" May 
6th, Prof. H. Gibbons, Jr., "The Heart and 
Its Disorders ;" May 20th, Prof. W. D. Johns- 
ton, "Lower Forms of Life." The lectures are 
entirely free, and no ticket of admission is 
required. 

Angora Products. — We are glad to learn 
by an item in the San Jose Mercury that C. P. 
Bailey, the well-known breeder of Angora 
goats, and president of the Angora Robe and 
Glove Manufacturing Co., has succeeded to the 
interest of his partners in the latter concern, 
and is preparing to enter upon the manufacture 
of these goods upon a much larger scale than 
heretofore. For this purpose he is erecting a 
two story building, 24x40, on North Fourth 
street, near Washington, which he expects to 
use as a factory by January Ist. He hopes 
to furnish employment to about 40 persons, a 
large proportion of whom will be women and 
girls. 

Messrs. Batchelor & Wvlie, of this city, 
have just received two steam-heat evaporators, 
which were manufactured expressly for the 
California market. These have been set ud and 
can be seen in operation at their store, No. 37 
Market street, where all fruitmen and others 
interested in producing a prime article of 
evaporated fruit are respectfully invited to call 
and examine the apparatus and system. 



^^GI^ICULTURAL J^OTES. 



CALIFORNIA. 
Butte. 

Almonds on Short Notice. — Oroville Regis 
(er, Jan 6: C. L. Durban, of Pentz, in Septem- 
ber last, gathered a crop of paper-shell almonds. 
One hundred of these nuts were put in the cel- 
lar where they would not dry too fast. Oct. 
20th he removed the shells and planted the 
nuts. Every one sprouted and came up, and 
the little trees are now from three to seven 
inches in hight. Mr. Durban expects to gather 
a crop from these trees during the fall of 1888, 
thus saving one year's time by planting the 
nuts almost as soon as picked from the tree. 

Contra Costa. 
A Giant Cauliflower. — G. A. Sellers, of 
Brentwood, lately presented the Oazette with a 
cauliflower which weighed nearly 20 pounds and 
measured across the head one foot and a half. 
It was raised on his farm from seed of the 
" Snowball " variety purchased in the East. 

El Dorado. 

Apples and Aurum.— Georgetown Oazette: 
A. J. Wilton, of Kentucky Flat, came down 
Wedneeday with his sixteenth load of choice 
apples for the season. This last load was all 
readily sold in Georgetown. Wilton's ranch is 
a remarkable one; while the surface is valuable 
for agricultural purposes, underneath is an 
ancient river channel rich with gold. The 
gravel lies from 40 to 200 feet below the sur- 
face and is drifted out and washed. Last year 
he leased the mine to Placerville parties, who 
were so encouraged with the returns that they 
have had their lease extended another year. 

Bio Turnips. — Republican, Jan. 6 : S. R. 
Tripp, of Upper Placerville, brought out a 
number of huge turnips last week, one of the 
Amber Globe variety weighing 14 pounds and 
measuring about a foot in diameter. A White 
Norfolk is nearly as large. 

Fresno. 

Handsome Raisins. — Expositor: Col. For- 
syth has sent to S. F. the most elegant box of 
raisins we ever laid eyes on. They were packed 
in a case about two feet wide, 30 inches in 
length, and two inches deep. Around the 
edges were arranged, as a border, rows of 
large, luscious-looking raisins, while from a 
common center radiated branches of the same 
fruit, the main stems showing between rows of 
gorgeous-looking berries. The case was faced 
with glass set in a nickel-plated frame. The 
fruit was unparalleled for size and beauty, and 
the arrangement in the box the work of an 
artist. It will be exhibited in S. F. for awhile, 
and then sent to Los Angeles. 

The Raisin Pack. — Republican, Jan. 7 : 
Exact figures for Fresno pack of raisins in 1880 
have not yet been obtained, but enough is 
known to make it certain that the general esti- 
mate of 200,000 boxes, made some months ago, 
was considerably too low. The pack will un- 
doubtedly reach 225,000 boxes, or 4,500,000 
pounds, and it may exceed that number by 
several thousand 20-pound boxes. 

Humboldt. 
Notes From Cuina Flat. — Cor. Standard, 
Dec. 27 : Most of the crops are in and doing 
well. Some of our farmers are behind hand, 
but are diligently at work plowing and sowing. 
Crane & Donohue have some very fine grain 
up, in fact, the finest on the river. Stock seems 
to be doing well considering the scarcity of feed. 
The grass has started and the hillsides begin 
to look green, but it is a poor quality and not 
much substance in it. Geo. Hemsted has over 
300 bearing peach trees all under eight years 
old, also about that number of other trees, con- 
sisting of apples, pears, plums, nectarines, cher- 
ries, apricots and figs, all of which are bearing. 
He also has a small vineyard which he intends 
to enlarge with choice grapes from Napa coun- 
ty. Prank Martin, of South Fort, also has a 
large orchard and vineyard. Many others have 
smaller orchards and all would enlarge them if 
they could get the fruit to market. 

Los Angeles. 
Money in Walnuts. — Downey Review: O. 
P. Passons' orchard in Los Nietos, of 17 acres, 
yielded him at the rate of $243. 24J per acre. 
The sum of $135.15 would pay all the expenses 
of taking care of the orchard. He sold 595 
sacks of walnuts, or 47,916 pounds, at Si and 5 J 
cents per pound, realizing .|i4000 net. As an- 
other instance, Mr. H. L. Montgomery sold 
§700 worth of soft-shell walnuts from two acres 
of land. 

Heavy Muscats. — Orange Tribune: Last sea- 
son the crop of Muscat grapes in the small vine- 
yard of Josiah Ross, near Santa Ana, was pur- 
chased by McPherson Bros. From one and 
three-quarter acres of land they picked and 
paid for, by actual weight, 27 tons and 500 
pounds of grapes. The price paid was .$20 per 
ton, on the vine, and the one and three-quarter 
acres brought Mr. Ross the snug little sum of 
$545. 

Mendocino. 
Bounty on Coyotes. — Ukiah Preu, Jan. 7: 
Our sheep-growers in the northern part of the 
county are in earnest in their efforts to rid Men- 
docino of coyotes. They have entered into an 
agreement between themselves to pay a bounty 
on scalps of $30 each, and if the Board of 
Supervisors do not move in this matter, thev 
have the assurance that the incentive for hunt- 
ing this most pernicious varmint ia double 



what it was under the old rule of $15 for each 
scalp brought to the courthouse. Now let our 
bold hunter boys " go for " the coyotes. Apply 
to either of [a dozen parties named] and receive 
your money. 

Monterey. 

Fine Stock Imported. — Salinas Index, .Jan. 

6 : J. C. Storm got back from the Atlantic 
States last week, bringing with him from Kan- 
sas 13 head of registered thoroughbred Durham 
cattle, viz., one 5 year-old cow, two 2-year-old 
heifers, five bulls from 6 months to a year old, 
and five calves. They are beauties. The cow 
took the first premium in her class for three 
years in succession at the Topeka fair. Mr. 
Storm also brought home from Illinois a di- 
minutive pony and a magnificent Cleveland bay 
stallion. The latter will be four years old next 
spring, is 16J hands high and weighs 1465 
pounds. He is a genuine Cleveland bay, of 
beautiful color, faultless form and fine action, 
remarkably kind and gentle. He has attracted 
much attention among our local horsemen since 
his arrival. Both cattle and horses came 
through in fine order. 

Napa. 

New Year's Melons. — E. G. H., in Calis- 
togian : We do not claim that watermelons can 
be raised here at all seasons of the year, as 
there is sometimes a little white frost in the 
winter; but I picked the last of my melons, 
raised in an exposed position to the outdoor 
weather, up to January 1st, when I concluded 
to pick them, ripe or not ripe. I found them 
ripe and perfectly sound inside and out. 

Prime Poultry. — St. Helena Star: Rev. 
James Mitchell, in addition to being an earnest, 
hard-working and popular minister, is also 
somewhat of a chicken fancier. We think we 
never before saw so fine a looking lot of poultry 
as he has in his yard. His special pride is a pen 
of 12 Wyandottes, the handsomest hens we ever 
set eyes on. The Wyandotte rooster he recently 
imported from Massachusetts, at a cost of nearly 
•$20, and there is probably no finer bird of the 
kind on the coast. He has his broilers weigh- 
ing at two months two pounds and at four 
months five pounds. The pullets lay at five 
months, being one month ahead of the Plymouth 
Rock. They are pretty, docile birds, nice to 
have around, and their early development ren- 
ders them most desirable for laying or for table 
use. From a setting of 25 eggs of this variety, 
Mr. Mitchell can show 21 healthy chicks. 

Placer. 

Grange-Planting. — Republican, 'Jan. 5 : 
The Auburn Orange Co. has bought 1000 bud- 
ded orange trees — the buds being one year old 
on two-year old stocks— 50 lemon trees and 10 
lime trees, which will be planted in their or- 
chard this spring. Besides these, 1000 Florida 
and 1000 Japanese seedlings will be placed in 
a nursery. Mr. Curry, manager of the orchard, 
says that of the trees planted last year those 
which came with the roots puddled have done 
better than those which came with the roots in 
balls. 

San Benito. 
Horse Distemper. — HoUister J[ France. Jan. 

7 : A mysterious disease is prevailing among 
horses in the neighborhood of San Felipe. 
Last week, Donnelly, Dunne & Co. lost six and 
Jack McCann three. The disease is described 
by veterinary surgeons as spinal meningitis or 
disease of the brain, and usually attacks young 
horses. Death follows soon after an appear- 
ance of the symptoms, unless promptly at- 
tended to. Horses taken with the disease first 
manifest its presence by drooping the head and 
listlessness. The surgeons recommend strong 
blistering along the spine as one of the best 
remedies. 

San Joaquin. 

Vines that Pay. — Stockton Independent: 
John Perrott, near Woodbridge, has a small 
vineyard of two and a half acres of Mission 
grapevines. For ten years he has realized more 
than $100 an acre for his grapes, which are of a 
common variety. Last season he raised the small- 
est crop for many years, but he sold from that 
two and a half acre vineyard 16 tons of grapes 
for $12.50 per ton, amounting to $200. T. J. 
Pope has a farm near Atlanta on what is called 
the " sand plains." Two years ago last spring 
he set out grapevines enough to cover one acre, 
and last fall gathered a good crop. The vines 
never had a drop of water other than the rains, 
and they are now in a strong, healthy condi- 
tion. Mr. Pope expects to gather a large crop 
this fall from that one lonesome acre of vines. 

Live-Stock and Dairy. — Norwalk Cor. L. 
A. Herald, Dec. 30: This is a fine stock coun- 
try, and during the past few years much atten- 
tion has been paid to the introduction of the 
best breeds of horses and cattle. The sales of 
these, as well as of beeves, do not appear 
among the outgoing railroad freights, although 
the rearing of fine horses is one of the most 
profitable and rapidly increasing industries of 
this section. A certain encouragement has been 
given to dairy farming by the prosperous cheese 
factory of Johnson & Lumbard, of Norwalk, al- 
though it is an industry not yet sufficiently ap- 
preciated by the farmers in general. During 
the year 1886 this firm consumed 940,869 
pounds of milk, manufacturing 104,869.|; pounds 
of cheese, from which has been realized $11,- 
869.62. 'The cheese is excellent in quality and 
commands a ready market at the highest prices. 
Shasta. 

A Citrus Veteran. — Shasta Courier: Four- 
teen years ago Dennis H. Dunn, one of Shasta's 
pioneers, planted an orange tree a few feet east 
of his dwelling on Back street. The plant was 



set in a hole about four feet in diameter, and 
mostly sunk in bedrock, dug out by '^ m. H. 
Dunn. The tree received no special attention, 
but was once topped. It now stands 13 feet 
high, is limbed from ground to top, and loaded 
with nice, bright, thin-skin oranges — a picture 
of tropical beauty here in the foothills, with 
snow-crowned Mount Shasta in the back- 
ground. This tree has this year borne 500 
fair-sized oranges, 150 of which have been 
picked ofif. 

Solano. 

Leveeing. — Dixon Tribune, Jan. 8: Work 
on the levees of Andrus island is being pushed 
forward. A good levee is completed more than 
half-way around the island, having a good easy 
slope to the hight of about two feet above high- 
water mark and a width of about seven feet on 
top. In places where the material is not good 
it is considerably wider. It has been com- 
pleted along the Georgiana slough, and the 
Mokelumne river to San Joaquin, except a few 
breaks where the dredger will fill in. The 
dredger has built about half a mile, beginning 
at the mouth of Seven-Mile slough. It is a per- 
fect success, filling the deepest and widest 
breaks in an incredibly short time. The ma- 
terial is pure sediment taken from the bottom 
of the slough and deposited where it will do the 
most good. With reasonably good luck they 
should complete the work in the next two or 
three months. The levees on Brannan island 
are nearly all completed, and in excellent con- 
dition. The people are generally hopeful and 
united in their purpose to succeed. 

Sonoma. 

Shipping Oranges. — Index-Tribune, Jan. 8 : 
— O. C. Carriger is engaged in filling an order 
for 600 boxes of oranges for a S. F. firm. The 
first shipment was made last Wednesday. The 
Carriger place, situated a few miles west of 
Sonoma, is noted for the excellence of its oranges, 
lemons, and limes, which are grown on a 
large scale and always find a ready and profit- 
able market. 

Tulare. 

Not Afraid op Drouth. — Delta, Jan. 6: 
J. B. Zumwalt, residing near Tulare, was in 
town on Monday. He has 600 acres in wheat, 
all up and looking well. He will put in 300 
more and then wait for rain. His farm has 
been irrigated so much, and is under such a 
good system of ditches, that prospective dry 
weather does not alarm him. The grain now 
up was growing finely previous to the first 
winter shower. The water stands now within 
seven feet of the surface, where a few years ago 
it stood at 25 feet. Irrigation has so filled the 
soil that one or two dry years will not cause 
much loss. 

NEVADA. 

Good Sale. — Reno Oazette, Jan. 5: O. 
North has made a sale of his beef cattle for $37 
a head on the ranch to Godchaux. He thinks 
he made the best sale that has occurred in the 
State. He had over 600 head. 



Anti-Debris Work. — At the last session, for 
1886, of the Yuba county supervisors, the Anti- 
Debris Committee, consisting of B. V. Dam, C. 
E, Stone and J. F. Flathmann, reported as fol- 
lows: We, your committee, beg leave to report 
that on the 20th day of July, 1886, a suit was 
commenced in the Superior Court of Yuba 
county, and an injunction was issued against 
the South Yuba Water and Mining Company, 
to restrain them from selling water for mining 
purposes, and to prevent them from mining 
upon the Yuba river or its tributaries. A suit 
has since that time been commenced in the Su- 
perior Court of Yuba county, and an injunction 
granted against the South Feather Water and 
Union Mining Company to prevent them from 
mining or depositing tailings in the tributaries 
of the Yuba river; also two new complaints 
have been tiled in the U. S. Circuit Court against 
the Milton Mining Company for contempt; also 
a complaint has been filed in the U. S. Circuit 
Court against the Manzanito Mining Company, 
of Crowell & Co., for contempt. All of which is 
respectfully submitted. 



Pure Wines. — There seems to have arisen an 
issue between Mr. Wetmore, of the Viticultural 
Commission, and a number of leading viticult- 
urists as to the value or expediency of the bill 
now pending before Congress, aiming to define 
pure wine. The pending bill does not restrict 
pure wine to that made from grape juice, and the 
prevailing sentiment of California wine-makers 
seems to be that such shall be its definition. 
The Santa Clara Viticultural Society has 
adopted resolutions to that effect. Mr. Wet- 
more has resigned his position as Chief Ex- 
ecutive Officer of the Commission. 



Mulberry Trees. — The State Board of Silk 
Culture has received a telegram from New 
York that the consignment of 500 mulberry 
trees of the cultivated Cattaneo species had ar- 
rived in that city and have been forwarded to 
San Francisco. These mulberry trees will be dis- 
tributed gratuitously to those interested in de- 
veloping the silk industry. Applications for 
trees should be sent to Mrs. Rienzi, Secretary 
State Board of Silk Culture, 22 Montgomery 
avenue, San Francisco, as soon as possible. 

The expected war of railroad passenger rates 
has hardly begun in earnest. Cuts of $0 to $12 
on through tickets overland are reported, in« 
deed, but there is at present little travel east- 
ward. 



46 



f ACIFie f^URAb f RESS. 



rjAN. 15, 1887 




To Whlttier on His Birthday. 

[The beloved and venerable Quaker poet having 
entered his 8oth year on the 17th of December, Mrs. 
E. Cavazza, in the I'ottland (Me.) Transcript, ad- 
dressed him a " Birthday Song," halt the stanzas of 
which follow. — El)S. Press.] 

What had thine heart to do with winter-time. 
Thy spirit with the darkness of the year, 
Thy soul with desolation and with dearth. 
That in the season of cold, and snow and rime. 
Of lessened light and branches bare and sere. 
Thy soul took shape, thy body had its birth. 
Thy life began to count its years on earth ? 
Yet winter hath no power upon these three ; 

The soul, the sun, the sea. 
These are of endless freedom; unconfined — 

And hence, Heaven had in mind 
To send thee, bearing gills of goodliest worth, 
A messenger unto men that thou mightst be 
Prophet and poet crowned of Liberty. 

* • ♦ 

Thy lips were touched with living sacred fire : 

Thy feet were turned aside from ways embowered 
Where Art would lure thei- with a lulling song ; 
With holy hands thou didst uphold the lyre 
Warning of judgment over sin that lowered — 
Apart, not mingled with the choral throng — 
Until the time was come, that tarried long. 
When rose the dawn of Liberty, and light 

Streamed up against the night, 
As when the sun makes glorious all the East ; 

And thou, not having ceased 
To sing throughout the darkened reign of wrong, 
Didst join the stars of morning and rejoice 
With voice victorious as a trumpet's voice. 

* « ♦ 
Yea, thou hast proved the depth of the abyss 

Is but the measure of celestial hight. 

And Love is great beyond man's utmost need. 
And darkness is no other thing than thi3 — 
The shadow of the substance of the light. 
Wiih hearts enlightened unto faiih and deed 
We follow gladly where thy footsteps lead. 
Singer elect of Love, and born to teach 
That Love is all, for each, 
And will not leave us lightless on the way 
Through any shadow — nay, 
That every evil hath in it the seed 
Of some remote strange blessing, no despair 
Can be so dark but light finds entrance there. 

How shall thy praise be said, the number told 
Of ihem that love and know or know not thee ? 
Lhey are as many as the oak-leaves of the wood 
Innumerable as sands that bound and hold 
The countless waves of the unmeasured sea. 
We hear and love thee, and we call thee good 
And bless thee for thy courage that withstood 
The scorn of scoffers for a noble cause, 

Thy songs that grew to laws. 
Thy faith in Love that will not tail to keep 

Us, though we wake or sleep. 
Thine heart fulfilled of human brotherhood 
Tender as strong : Have honor ol us and praise 
For all thy past and all thy future days! 



The Senator's Daughter. 

CHAl'TEK II. 

[Written for the Rural Prkss by Sarah Campbell 
Sanfori).] 

At last/in the " wee sma' Honrs," he became 
quiet and sank into a disturbed sleep, while I 
watched the night through. To keep me awake 
I searched among the books on his shelves and 
found Holland's " Bitter-Sweet," one of moth- 
er's books. In my nervousness I dropped the 
volume, and in picking it up it opened to a 
marked passage : " And then the fight began, 
'twixt hell and me, for my husband's soul, with 
the odds against me." 

The book slipped from my nerveless fingers 
as the awfulnesB of my position revealed itself 
to me, invoked by those words, that mother 
had realized to the utmost. I wrung ray im- 
potent hands in an agony of grief; dry, hard 
sobs escaped me, but no tears — they eeemed 
scorched, burnt up, by those dreadful words. 
I buried my face in the sofa pillow and 
wrestled with myself for control. It seemed as 
though I must throw myself from the window 
in my desperation. At last the words I had 
been reading in ".Janet's Repentance" came to 
me. They had lingered in my memory, it 
seems : "Beware of the groans of the wound- 
ed soul. Oppress not to the utmost a single 
heart; for a solitary sigh has power to overset 
a whole world." Ah, to think of the sighs and 
groans from mother's dear lips in that very 
room ! Were they to count for naught ? 

From her, my thoughts traveled out, toward 
the great army of women encamped all over the 
world, fighting this evil, and being overwhelmed 
and borne down by it; not because the rum 
traffic has such a mighty following, but because 
the better class of men and women are so indif- 
ferent to it. Because the law and Government 
^hrow the mantle of respectability about it. Ah, 
i the law-makers would make it just as much 



of a crime to manufacture or sell the accursed 
stuflf that made my father a demon that night— 
that liquid fire that caused him to fell me to the 
floor, as to make or pass counterfeit money, how 
many homes would be happy, how many little 
children, shivering and starving to-night, would 
become bright-eyed, joyous creatures I I am 
only a young girl — I don't know much about 
the science of Government; but I believe, when 
alcohol is put under the ban of the law, many 
of society's most difficult problems will be 
solved. 

As thoughts like these coursed through my 
brain, all sense of fatigue left me, and I paced 
the room until morning broke. Father still 
slept, and how to make my escape from the 
room bdfore he awoke perplexed me. At last I 
ventured to swing out over the cornice and 
catch on to the kitchen roof, and from there it 
was quite easy to clamber down to the back 
porch, and so to the ground. Then I searched 
for the key, and while on my knees, feeling all 
through a verbena bed, Alvar laid his hand on 
my shoulder and drew me to my feet. 

" You haven't slept at all; why did you not 
call me ?" 

" Oh, no, dear Alvar; you must never inter- 
fere; pretend you know nothing." 

" But you are walking in the same path that 
led mother to her death. Must we all be sac- 
rificed to this dreadful curse ? " 

" No, I am stronger than mother. I shall live 
to con(|uer. " 

" No, you can do very little; you may hin- 
der, but you cannot cure, his thirst; and after 
you have worn yourself out, he will go down, 
drageing us all with him." 

" No, Alvar ! do not say it, do not think it 
for one moment. Somebody has said some- 
where that, ' One man with (iod, with duty 
and conscience, is at last a majority.' I am not 
a man, only a simple girl; but I am trying to 
do my duty, and that is as much in the sight of 
God as if I were a king." 

As i took my eyes from his face they rested 
on mother's white-rose bush, and there, hanging 
on one of the branches, was the missing key. 
1 gave a cry of pleasure and ran to father's 
room to put it on the inside of the door before 
he awoke. He did not go to the office for sev- 
eral days, but fought, until, for the time be 
ing, he overcame the demon within him, be- 
fore he went out in the midst of temptation. 

That was the hardest fight. I never had to 
resort to force again. My entreaties would 
prevail when the tempest raged within him. 
His business increased, and money became 
plenty; in fact, I hardly knew what to do with 
the sums he gave me. The dear old home was 
refurnished, pictures and books abounded, and 
pretty dresses were common. Of course, 
spending so much time with father debarred me 
from much society, and but for the kindness of 
the Stanhopes I should have been entirely for- 
gotten; but father and Alvar were always in- 
cluded in my invitations, and father found such 
congenial companionship at their parties that 
he was as ready to go as we. 

At first, I feared the wine-cup, and declined 
the invitation; but dear Mrs. Stanhope wrote 
me such a kind note, telling me that since she 
had witnessed my struggle against that enemy 
she had resolved, with her husband's consent, 
to banish it from their sideboard. And then 
she said perhaps my influence would save some 
member of her family as well as my own. How 
the glad tears rolled down my face ! Was it 
possible that poor commonplace I could exert 
an influence in such a place ? Then the thought 
came to me that we must just live the right 
life, think the right thoughts, and say the right 
word, regardless of what it might or might not 
do — in other words, do right for the sake of 
right, and God will take care of the rest. 

In return for all their kindness, father pro- 
posed to take Jessie with me to his old home in 
the country, a farm about 100 miles distint. 
So one bright morning in June we set off for a 
week's visit. The place was occupied by a 
brother of father's. I had never been there, 
and was quite unprepared for the primitive low- 
eaved house, with its yellow paint — a rambling, 
roomy structure, suggestive at the first glance 
of wide, low- browed rooms and deep fireplaces. 
Under the front windows a brilliant dispUy of 
sweet-williams, foxglove and marigolds, and on 
either side of the broad, flat, unhewn stone, 
which formed the doorstep, glowed the blood- 
red peonies. 

Beside the fence, and between the long rows 
of currant bushes and the border of sunflowers, 
stood a line of beehives, around which, through 
all those long summer days, was a drowsy mur- 
mur from the pollen-dusted workers, as they 
came and went from great beds of balm and 
sage, or hovered over the gaudy borders, where 
blossomed tiger-lilies, tall hollyhocks and 
monk's-hood, interspersed with the more deli- 
cate faces of sweet-peas and carnations. 

Near the garden gate stood the well, its 
wooden curb and platform weather-stained and 
mossy with the rains of many years. In the 
rear of the house were the great barns, which, 
with the clustering sheds and out-buildings, 
made almost a village of themselves. 

Of course, we, as guests, entered the front 
door and were shown into the " best room." 
It was a low-ceiled room, with a handsome rag 
carpet in broad-shaded stripes of red and green. 
The furniture was old-fashioned spider-legged 
mahogany and hair cloth — bought, I suppose, 
for my grandmother at her marriage. Between 
the front windows stood a card table, never 
used for play, on which were disposed a num- 
ber of books in brilliant bindings, laid in prim 
little piles of three or four; the family pictures 



in ambrotype. On the wall, framed in resplen- 
dent gilt, were the oil portraits of my grandpar- 
ents, a couple famed in their youth for beauty. 
How strange was their dress, and how stiff and 
ungraceful was every line ! Either the coun- 
try-side was incapable of passing judgment or 
the artist failed to delineate the beauty, for 
more ugly pictures I never saw. 

Aunt Lucy seemed determined to keep Jessie 
and me in this sacred apartment, but we 
avoided it during our stay, preferring the large, 
cool dining-room. This latter was used in 
winter for the kitchen, but during the warm 
weather the cookstove held sway in a "lean- 
to." so that the farmer's dinners of boiled 
cabbage, etc., did not penetrate into the spick- 
span rooms, redolent of lavender. It was a 
large square room of cheerful aspect, and 
always impressed one with its exquisite neat- 
ness. The yawning fireplace was filled in with 
the vivid green of asparagns tops, and a large 
red and white jar full of lilacs stood on the 
brick hearth. The furniture was plain and old- 
fashioned; a birch table, a tall secretary, cur- 
tained behind its glass doors with faded green 
silk; a few straight-backed, splint-bottomed 
chairs and a settee with pillows in patchwork. 
Green shades shut out the bright sunlight, and 
we found it delightfully cool and inviting after 
our rambles in the heat. Oh, how we reveled 
in the meadows and woods ! 

Aunt Lucy was a quiet, unpretending woman 
whose whole soul was devoted to housekeeping 
and her family. Soapsuds and fresh air were 
cardinal virtues with her. 

The family consisted of Uncle Heman, Aunt 
Lucy, the hired man, little three-year-old 
Tude (the child's name was John, but Tude was 
the home name), and the maid-of-all-work. An 
older son was away, attending school, and their 
daughter was teaching. 

How still and quiet was that first evening of 
our arrival ! And what strange sounds greeted 
my ears before it was fairly light ! The noisy 
barnyard fowls, the cry of the calves and the 
lowing of their mother cows; the stir and bustle 
attending the morning duties of a dairy farm 
proved so exciting to us that we soon found 
ourselves out in the barn, where the entire fam- 
ily, save Aunt Lucy and baby Tude, were milk- 
ing. There stood the patient creatures, each in 
its stall, with its head in a queer-looking yoke 
or something, calmly chewing their cuds. The 
smell of the fresh milk, with the fragrance of 
the new hay, the vaulted roof of the huge barn, 
and the swallows circling overhead, gave us a 
new and pleasant experience. " We come to 
our own" in the country, surely. All style and 
fashion slip down and away, and our real selves 
know and feel the sympathy existing between 
man and nature. 

What do we want of carpets, when we can 
press our feet in the soft green of yonder undu- 
lating meadow ? \N ho cares for upholstery so 
long as that gnarled tree covered with moss in- 
vites one to rest and drink in the blessed sun- 
shine and sweet-scented air ! The privileges of 
town — what are they ? Is it the opera one sighs 
for ? Just take an early morning walk and see 
if Mrs. Sigourney wasn't right when she wrote: 

" There's a concert, a concert of gladness and glee. 
The program is rich, and the tickets are free; 
In a grand, vaulted hall, where there's room and to 
spare. 

With no gaslight to eat up the oxygen there. 

The musicians excel in their wonderful art. 

They have compass of voice, and the gamut by heart; 

They have traveled abroad in the winter recess. 

And sang to vast crowds with unbounded success. 

Aud now 'tis a favor and privilege rare 

Their arrival to hail, and their melodies share." 

How graceful the songsters are, and how they 
flirt and swing and chirp between the acts ! I 
saw, one morning, three swinging on the whip- 
lash, which happened to be left in its socket. 
What an ecstasy they were in ! It made me 
feel ready to soar away with them in the blue 
sky. 

What delightful rambles we took during the 
cool morning hours, returning to the quiet 
darkened living-room, with its fragrance, to read 
and doze away the long, sultry day with the 
noisy cackling of the busy hens sounding in our 
ears. 

When the shadows began to lengthen, Jessie 
n d I would run to the barn to hunt the eggs. 
Perhaps the time spent in clambering and slid- 
ing over the delicious new hay, searching for 
those "great pearls," was the most enjoyable 
of all the lovely time spent on the farm. 

Tude always accompanied us. He became 
passionately fond of Jessie, and was her 
shadow. Dear little fellow ! he seemed pos- 
sessed to swim, as he termed it, in a tiny brook 
that ran through the meadows a short distance 
from the house. He was forbidden the amuse- 
ment, but that only enhanced the pleasure. 

One night, as Jessie prepared him for bed, 
she suddenly exclaimed, "Ah, Tude, you, have 
been swimming again." 

"No, 'deed no," answered the boy. 

"Yes, you have, you bad boy." 

" Haven't neither." 

"How did your shirt come to be wrong side 
out, then 1 " 

He stopped and thought a moment, then 
looked up into her face as grave as a judge and 
said: " It must have got turned when I crawl- 
ed through the fence." 

Poor child ! His naughty story went un- 
punished that time. We laughed so immoder- 
ately at its wit, we could not lecture him on 
the sinfulness of his falsehood. 

His mother looked grave when we told her 
the next morning, and said: "Did you ever 
stop to consider that the only weapon a little 



child h as is a falsehood ? Little dogs have 
their teeth and kittens their claws, but a child 
has only a lie. How careful we should be, 
then, in governing him, to prevent his being 
tempted to commit that sin. Tude's father 
promised him a whipping the next time he went 
into the water, and now he has done a greater 
wrong, for I think there can be nothing worse 
than to acquire the habit of deceiving." And 
she sighed as she sifted the flour for bread. 

That day was our last on the farm. A letter 
calling father back to his office cut short our 
visit. Soon after our return. Earl, Jessie's 
brother, came home from Harvard with honors. 
A series of lawn-fetes, dinner-narties and balls 
were inaugurated at the " Terrace," as the 
Stanhope residence was called. He was to 
have only a month's vacation, and then off' for 
Heidelberg; so the whole month was given up 
to pleasuring. Father said he might as well 
close the office and do nothing, he was kept gal- 
lanting around so much: but he was the gayest 
of the gay, and became a great favorite. 

One dav we were sailing in Earl's beautiful 
yacht, " The Lady of the Lake." Earl looked 
like a true sailor, and managed our little craft 
like one, too. The day was perfect, and while 
we were lying becalmed, just off a tiny island, 
I reveled in the rich draughts of nunshine and 
beautiful tints of sky and water. The soft air, 
the whole scene, intoxicated me, as Nature, in 
her balmy moods, ever does. Oh ! is there an 
amusement, a recreation, in all the world equal 
to spending a perfect day on a sailing craft, 
away from the busy, crowded town, a little 
world to ourselves, away for hours from the 
daily papers and the telegraph ? 

Jessie said: " Why, the most wonderful 
things may be happening over there, and we 
can't know it." 

If one could only sail on, and on, without 
thought or care where or when we should land ! 
But as that cannot be, I lay my worries down 
by the front gate and forget them while absent, 
never lembering they exist until I return and 
fit them to my shoulders again. It is surpris- 
ing how much weight they lose in the interim ! 
That particular morning household affairs had 
jarred considerably, but the moment my foot 
touched the deck I knew nothing save this — 
God is good and this world delightful. I leaned 
my head on the rail and gave myself up to 
dreaming, regardless of the gay voices around 
me. Mrs. Stanhope at last rallied me from my 
reverie. I made answer by quoting : 

" ' In the spring a young man's fancy 
Lightly turns to thoughts of love.' 

" But mine turn to poetry. O dear Mrs. 
Stanhope ! thoughts press so heavily on my 
mind, but I cannot find words to express them. 
Why are we given the desire, without the lan- 
guage or the means to make it known?" 

" Dear child," said she, " we do not live for 
ourselves alone, or by ourselves; we are part 
and parcel of a great whole. Thomas Carlyle 
in his essay on Robert Burns says: 'It takes 
generations to produce a poet.' If this is true, 
then cultivate and encourage every lofty and 
noble aspiration, even it it finds no voice with 
you. In some subtle process, mysterious to 
our mortal ken, all our thoughts will be 
garnered, and will bear fruit some time. If 
we could only realize that our very thoughts 
influence coming generations, would we not be 
' pure in heart ' indeed ? Spurn an evil, im- 
pure thought from your mind as you would 
spurn a reptile from your path, and the world 
with all its evil tendencies can do you little 
harm." 

How noble she looked, standing there in 
her gracious womanhood ! The breeze which 
had just begun to freshen stirred the silver hair 
on her forehead. May I so live that my 
years will rest like a crown upon me in my old 
age. 

The wind increased, the sails caught the breeze, 
the timbers creaked, and away we sped. All was 
animation and life. Earl stood at the helm; 
occasionally his clear voice would ring out, 
" Trim ship !" and hurry-skurry to one side we 
would all go, amid the laughter and jests that 
lie so near the surface with a pleasure party. 
The sun sank out of sight, and the night air be- 
gan to be chilly as the darkness shut down 
about us. ^Ve were (juite near the landing, 
when suddenly a gale struck us, and over our 
little ship careened, and threw part of the pas- 
sengers into the dark water. Jessie was sing- 
ing to her guitar accompaniment; her voice 
floating out over the water was enough to di- 
vert one's thoughts, and I suppose Earl was not 
quick enough with bis command to trim ship. 
Thus our day's enjoyment was almost turned 
into a tragedy. I remember Jessie's voice in 
these words: 

" -iVnd here and there a foamy flake, 
Upon me as I travel. 
With many a silver waterbreak 
Above the golden gravel." 

I caught the last word, while struggling with 
the cold water; then a mighty rush was borne 
in upon my senses. 

(TO BK CONILVl'SD.] 



Wytopitlock. — Many names of Maine towns 
and villages are puzzling to the uninitiated, 
both in pronunciation and spelling, and it is 
fortunate that postmasters, mail agents, etc., 
are gifted with the Yankee faculty of guessing. 
A postal clerk in Penobscot county had a 
puzzle of the kind the other day. He found 
two letters in his mail, one going to " Whitoo 
Bedlock " and the other to " White Opedlock." 
He sent them to Wytopitlock and they have 
not yet returned. 



Jan. 15, 1887.] 



pACIFie I^URAb f RESS. 



7 



Something for Nothing. 

Don't try to get something for nothing. It 
is not the right spirit. It is thia propensity 
that leads men into gambling. There is a great 
demand for lottery tickets everywhere because 
people want something for nothing. Thousands 
of people answer spurious advertisements which 
set forth that, by sending some paltry amount, 
information will be returned whereby a fortune 
may be easily made. The proposition is so ab- 
surd on the face of it that it would seem that no 
half-witted person would pay any attention to 
it, yet some very intelligent people " bite 
at it." 

Don't want to get something for nothing ! 
The consequences of such a desire are disastrous 
in every respect. Probably nine-tenths of all the 
criminal cases on record originated in the de- 
sire to get something without giving an equiva- 
lent for value received. And this is not bring- 
ing into account the traffic of rura-selling, 
which our imperfect institutions make legiti- 
mate. The consequences of this terrible evil 
alone are enough to cause us to blush that hu- 
manity is so weak as to tolerate by legal sanc- 
tion a curse that destroys more lives in peace 
than are sacrificed in all the wars, not taking 
into account the privation and suffering of inno- 
cent women and children. It all comes about 
from a desire to get something for nothing. 

Nearly all the evils and abuses of the world 
are the outgrowth of this pernicious propensity. 
Liberated from this curse, the human family 
would be regenerated and the necessity for 
great reforms would be superseded by a volun- 
tary obedience to moral laws. Men would not 
then be urged by a morbid desire for gain into 
all manner of corrupt, dishonorable and in- 
famous double-dealing and trickery against 
known laws of right. For we take it that no 
man consents to do wrong without moral com- 
punction, and but for a morbid propensity for 
gain few among those who now set conscience 
aside would be violators of moral laws bearing 
upon the just rights and privileges of all. — 
Shasta Co. Index. 



" I Made That Man What He Was." 

A saloon keeper in Dover, Delaware, who 
patronized his own bar very liberally, stepped 
into a back room where men were at work about 
a well The covering had been removed, and 
he approached to look down, but being very 
drunk, pitched in head foremost. He had be- 
come 80 much of a bloat, by the use of strong 
drink, that it was impossible to extricate him 
in time to save his life. There was great excite- 
ment in the town. Men and women who had 
never been inside his saloon before were the first 
to rush to the rescue, and offer sympathy to the 
bereaved family. As he was dragged from the 
well, and stretched out dead on the saloon floor, 
a wholesale liquor dealer from Philadelphia 
stepped in. After the first shook of finding one 
of his good customers dead, he turned to a 
prominent lady, and said, pointing to the 
wretched victim : "I made that man what he 
was. I lent him the first dollar, and set him up 
with his first stock of liquors, and now he is 
worth .§10,000 or $15,000." Looking him square 
in the face, she replied : " Yes, you did make 
that man what he was — a drunkard, a bloat, a 
stench in the nostrils of society; and sent him 
headlong into eternity and a drunkard's hell. 
What is $15,000 weighed against a lost soul, a 
wasted life, a wife a widow, and children 
orphans ?" 

He turned deadly pale, and without a word 
left the house. 

What is all the revenue to the millions whose 
homes are destroyed, whose children are beg- 
gared, and whose loved ones are sent headlong 
to a drunkard's grave? — The Chrhdan Women. 



Qqaint Old Marriage Records. — The world 
discourages, and rightly so, the marriage of 
December with May, and when such marriages 
took place in former times they were usually 
recorded in some such way as this: " •22 d 
August (1782). At Bath, Captain Hamilton, 
aged ,30, to Mrs. Munson, a lady of rank and 
fortune, aged 85." We may find even a dis- 
tance of 80 years between an old man and his 
bride. In February, 1769, " Roberc Judge, 
Esq., of Cooksburgh, Ireland, aged 95, to Miss 
Annie Nugent, aged 15. He served in King 
William's wars, and received a ball in his nose." 
Particulars of hight, as well as of age, fortune 
and length of courtship, were often given. 
" December (1755). At York, Mr. Thomas, a 
grenadier in the Yorkshire militia, six feet two 
inches high, to Miss Hannah Tennick, of Clear- 
lam, three feet two inches high, with a fortune 
of £5000." And on April 5, 1785, at Ripley 
church, Mr. Robert Long was married to Miss 
Reynard; between them there was disparity 
both of age and size, " the bridegroom being 
37 years of age and more than six feet high; the 
bride 20 years old and little more than three 
feet high." The record of a marriage in 1779 
of a couple aged respectively 80 and 85 con- 
cludes thus: " And what is still more remark- 
able, there has been a courtship carried on be- 
twixt them for more than 60 years." — Brooklyn 
Magazine. 

"Is there much water in the cistern, Biddy ? " 
inquired a gentleman of his Irish girl as she 
came up from the cellar. " It is lull on the 
bottom, sir, but there's nothing at all on the 
top," was the reply. — Boston Budget. 



*^OUNG ]!El0LKS' C[obUMJ^. 



A Girl's Experience at School. 

[Written for the Rural Press by Dollie Brooks.] 

It was just after the monthly reports had 
been distributed in the seminary at Highland 
Park and the girls were very anxious to see 
how many credits they had received during the 
month. Each one was asking the other : 
" What did you get in arithmetic, geography 
or algebra, etc. " Did you get a hundred in 
anything'?" They all stood unusually high this 
month, except Annie Morris. As soon as she 
had received her report she ran off to her room, 
for she was very much afraid the girls would 
ask her the same question and she was ashamed 
to tell them. 

She said nothing about it to any one except 
her room-mate, who was in the room when she 
entered. Annie said that it was the teacher's 
fault, for she knew she ought to be marked 
higher. But she could not help thinking to 
herself all the while that it was her own fault. 

By and by her room-mate went out and she 
was left to herself. Conscience whispered to 
her: "Annie, you know you ought not to 
blame your teacher when it is your own fault, 
because you know if you had studied like the 
rest you would have stood as high." 

Just then Mary Ford, one of the girls, hap- 
pened to come in, and was astonished to see 
Annie sulking. "What is the matter?" she 
asked. Annie said "Nothing," and put her 
card in a book so it could not be seen. But her 
friend did see it, and asked her to let her look 
at it. This she hesitated to do, but at last con- 
sented. Mary said she thought it was the 
teacher's fault, too, and told the girls so. 

She asked them to come into her room and 
talk it over after supper. This was agreed to. 

They assembled in Mary Ford's room, and I 
am sorry to say that, with one exception, all 
took Annie's part in blaming the teacher. They 
all felt very much inclined to pity her and 
thought she was abused. 

They even advised her to complain to the 
teacher. Annie took their advice, and the next 
morning went to the teacher and told her she 
thought she deserved to be marked higher in 
her report, and that it was too bad to be dis- 
graced before all the school. 

Miss Jones, the teacher, said very kindly but 
firmly: " The report is correct; if you had 
studied like the rest you would have stood just 
as high. You have been urged to do your duty 
many times, but idleness and inattention are 
your two great faults, and until you correct 
them you cannot advance like the other 
scholars." Annie went off to her room 
crying. She knew she was in the 
wrong. A knock was soon heard at 
the door, and Emma Taylor, the girl who did 
not take her part, entered. "I come as a 
friend," said Emma in her mild way, " not to 
find fault with you, but to give you my advice. 
I am sorry you are so low in your reoort, and 
it is no one's fault but your own. You know 
as well as I do, Annie, that you wasted nearly 
all your time in school when you ought to 
have been studying like the rest. You hurt 
Miss Jones' feelings very badly when you told 
her that which was just as much as to say she 
cheated you in your report. Now, if I were 
you, Annie, I would go and ask Miss Jones to 
forgive me and tell her you will be a better 
girl in school." 

Annie thanked her friend for her advice and 
promised she would follow it, for she knew it 
was the truth, and the very next day she 
apologized to Miss Jones, who readily forgave 
her and pointed out to her how to avoid the 
same trouble in the future. She was a better 
girl after this and became very fond of Emma 
Tavlor and Miss Jones. 

Suisun, Solano Co. 



Morro Notes. 

Dear Editor : — Morro is improving ; if has 
a hotel, a brass band, a skating rink, and the 
school has 25 scholars. We had a nice Christ- 
mas and a party afterward, which was very 
nice. The Spooners played for the party. 

We've not had much rain yet, and the dairy- 
men and the farmers are feeling very blue for 
fear of a dry year. 

Cayucos is still improving. I do not know 
much about Cambria, for I do not go there. 

They have completed the schoolhouse at 
San Simeon, and Mr. Hearst gave them an or- 
gan, which is veiy nice. Their school is out 
until March. Our school closes in March. 

People in the East couldn't believe that we 
could pick tomatoes from the vines for Christ- 
mas, and bouquets. All of mamma's geraniums 
and fuschias are out of doors. B. M. 

Morro. 



The Mound-Builders. — Recent explorations 
prove that the ancient mound-building inhabi- 
tants of America extended their works north- 
ward beyond the Red river of the North, 
Along this river and Lake Winnipeg were found 
mounds identical in structure with the famous 
ones of the Ohio and Mississippi valleys, 

A Handy Pen-Wiper. — A good pen-wiper 
for steel pens is a piece of raw potato. It removes 
the ink crust and causes a smooth flow of ink. 



Lanolin — A New Oil. 

Lanolin is the name given to a new fatty 
substance obtained from the alkaline water- 
wastings of wool, and very highly recommended 
as a base for various medicated salves and oint- 
ments used in treating cutaneous eruptions and 
other external as well as internal disorders. It 
consists of varying proportions of cholesterin 
and fat acids, with which is incorporated a cer- 
tain percentage of water, which it readily ab- 
sorbs, thus forming a smooth, white, unctuous 
mass. As some of our professional readers will 
be interested to know how it is prepared, we 
are able to present the following formula, as 
contained in a late issue of the Western Drug- 
gist: 

" The wool-washings are first passed through 
a fine sieve to free them from mechanical im- 
purities, and then through a convenient quan- 
tity of cut straw or sawdust; the solution is 
then treated with magnesium sulphate, and the 
resulting magnesium soap, containing also the 
cholesterin, is collected, well washed with 
water, then drained and allowed to dry by ex- 
posure to air. It is then treat<=d with sufficient 
diluted hydrochloric acid to decompose the 
soap; a large excess of hydrochloric acid should 
be avoided, but sufficient added until a slight 
excess of acid is indicated, which is afterward 
removed in the process. The resulting fatty 
scum, consisting of fatty acids and cholesterin, 
is drained and treated with petroleum benzine 
in a closed vessel, slightly warmed to about 85' 
F, to aid solution, and then filtered through 
flannel in a closed filter press, Tne petroleum 
benzine is then driven off by evaporation or dis- 
tillation, and to remove any remaining traces of 
hydrochloric acid, the residue is treated with 
from one-tenth to one-fourth per cent of car- 
bonate of magnesia, rubbed up with water, the 
mixture being then well washed with fresh por- 
tions of water, until the water washings are no 
longer milky. It is then again melted, filtered, 
while hot, through flannel, and, when cold, 
water is incorporated, and the lanolin be- 
comes white, hard and smooth." 

The peculiar valuable quality of lanolin con- 
sists in the facility with which it penetrates 
the skin and is absorbed into the system. 
This peculiar characteristic makes it especially 
valuable as a carrier. There is no doubt but 
that gray ointments, and in fact all ointments, 
are much more efficient when prepared with 
lanolin. When used on mucous surfaces it 
never forms a scab. 



Dust and Dusting.- — At all times unwhole- 
some, when dampness gets hold of dust it 
ferments, decays and becomes positively poi- 
sonous; and this must needs happen on any 
rainy day, on foggy mornings, on dewy nights, 
and at that season of the year when dampness 
seems to penetrate the house, and it is not yet 
time to light the fires that might dry it out or 
hinder it. The rooms of a dwelling-house, 
then, cannot be too thoroughly swept and 
dusted off, in order that the least possible de- 
posit of dust may be left in them. Many 
housewives think that the less the dust is 
stirred in sweeping, the better the work is 
done, and tea leaves and wet grass or moist 
ened meal is thrown about the floor in order to 
gather the dust and prevent it from rising. But 
people giving the matter philosophical attention 
have come to the conclusion that precisely the 
opposite course is the tit and proper one; that 
a good stirring up and then a good blowing out 
is what the dust needs, and that with a wind 
blowing unobstructedly through the room as 
thoroughly as a wind can be made to blow, — 
Harper's Bazar. 



Sleep a Preventive op Headache. — A sci- 
entific writer says : Sleep, if taken at the 
right moment, will prevent an attack of nervous 
headache. If the subjects of such headaches 
will watch the symptoms of its coming, they 
can notice that it begins with a feeling of weari- 
ness or heaviness. This is the time a sleep of 
an hour, or even two, as nature guides, will 
effectually prevent the headache. If not taken 
just then it will be too late, for, after the at- 
tack is fairly under way, it is impossible to get 
sleep till far into the night, perhaps. It is so 
common in these days for doctors to forbid 
having their patients waked to take medicine 
if they are asleep when the hour comes round, 
that the people have learned the lesson pretty 
well, and they generally know that sleep is bet- 
ter for the sick than medicine. But it is not so 
well known that sleep is a wonderful preventive 
of disease — better than tonic regulators and 
stimulants. 

Diphtheria and Manure Heaps. — M. Fer- 
raud, Lyon Medical, traces the relation between 
manure heaps and rural epidemics of diphtheria. 
On one occasion the disease appeared the day 
following a general street cleaning. He argues 
that manure should be kept in closed wells of 
stone, glazed with bitumen, so constructed that 
the fluids may filter away from the solid matter. 

Deaths from Being Struck by Falling 
Meteors. — Prof. Shepard,of New Haven, makes 
a statement which will surprise most persons. 
He says: " There have been several instances 
of deaths occasioned by meteoric stones. Two 
monks in different places were thus killed in 
Italy, and two sailors on shipboard in Sweden." 



X)ojviESTie Qeoj^ojviY. 



To Make Soft Soap,— Dissolve three pounds 
of potash in three quarts of water. Put the 
potash, in the lump, in an old saucepan, pour 
the boiling water on it, set it on the stove and 
leave it till it is dissolved; it may take several 
hours. Stir it about with a stick now and 
then, taking care not to splash it on you, put 3 
pounds of clean fat in a tub or small barrel. 
When the potash is dissolved, pour on the fat, 
stir well with the stick and leave it. Next day 
pour a kettle ( holding at least a gallon) of boiling 
water, slowly to the potash and fat, stirring 
thoroughly. Do this every morning till the 
soap is made, which you will know by it be- 
ginning to look like stiff jelly when cold, and 
losing all appearance of grease; then try it; if 
it seems too strong, or makes the hands rough, 
add more boiling water. The soap will be 
ready to use in about nine days after it is 
started. 



Removing Cake from Tins. — Supposing it to 
be a loaf of cake in a deep tin. First, you 
must butter the tin all around the sides and 
bottom, then butter the paper as well (cutting 
it to fit the tin exactly). Now, when the cake 
is baked, don't try to take it from the tin while 
hot; set it away until perfectly cold; then re- 
turn it to the fire long enough to warm the tin 
through, then turn it upside down on your 
hand, and tap the edge of the tin on the table, 
and it will slip from the tin all right, and ^ou 
can take off the paper without any injury to 
the cake. 

Almond Paste. ^ — One pound sweet almonds, 
six bitter almonds, one pound finely sifted 
sugar, whites of two eggs. Blanch the almonds 
and dry them thoroughly; put them into a 
mortar and pound them well, wetting them 
gradually with the whites of two eggs. When 
well pounded, put them into a small preserving 
pan, add the sugar and place the pan on a small 
but clear fire (a hot plate is better), keep stir- 
ring until the paste is dry, then take it out of 
the pan and put it between two dishes until 
cold. 



Velvet Pudding. — Five eggs beaten sepa- 
rately, one cup of white sugar; beat well togeth- 
er, then stir in four tablespoonfuls of corn- 
starch dissolved in a little sweet milk; three 
pints of sweet milk; let it come to a boiling 
point, then stir in briskly the other ingredients, 
then let it boil until it becomes quite thick, re- 
move it from the fire, pour into your baking 
dish. When nearly done, take the white of 
eggs, beaten to a froth with one cup of sugar, 
and pour over the top of the pudding. 



Apple Fritters. — Make a smooth batter of 
one-half pound of flour, three eggs and a half- 
pint of sweet milk; salt to taste. Cut one 
dozen large, juicy apples into slices, after peel- 
ing and coring them. Put the slices into the 
batter. Have ready a pan of equal parts of 
lard and butter boiling hot. Take the batter 
up in a ladle, allowing a slice of apple to each 
fritter, and drop into the hot lard. Fry brown, 
drain a moment, and serve with powdered sugar 
and nutmeg. 



Boiled Squash. — Peel and slice the squash, 
removing the seeds. Lay in cold water half an 
hour, then put on the stove in enough boiling 
water, slightly salted, to cover it. Boil for an 
hour, drain dry in a colander, and mash and 
beat smooth in a wooden bowl. Heat again, 
stirring in a lump of butter the size of an egg 
and quarter of a cupful of milk. Season to 
taste and serve very not. 



Cottage Pudding. — One cup of sugar, one 
tablespoonful of butter, one cup of milk, two 
eggs, two cups preoared flour. Cream the 
butter and sugar, add the whipped yolks of the 
eggs, the milk, the flour and the beaten whites. 
Bake in a brick-shaped mold well greased, and 
slice crosswise. Eat with either hard or liquid 
sauce. 

Apple-Custard Pie. — Three cups stewed 
apples; one cup (nearly) white sugar; six eggs; 
one quart milk. Beat the eggs light, and mix 
the yolks well with the apple, seasoning .with 
nutmeg only. Stir in the milk gradually, beat- 
ing as you go on; finally, add the whites, fill 
the crust, and bake without cover. 



Corn Pudding. — Drain the liquor from a 
can of corn and chop the kernels very fine. 
Rub together a tablespoonful of butter and 
sugar, add a beaten egg and two cupfuls of 
milk. Stir the chopped corn into this, salt 
slightly and bake in a good oven for about half 
an hour. 



DELiciotJS Dish of Apples. — Take two 
pounds of apples, pare and core them, slice 
them into a pan, add one pound of loaf sugar 
and the juice of three lemons; let them boil 
about two hours, turn into a dish, and serve 
with thick cream. 



Danger in Nickel-Plated Ware. — An order 
has been issued in Lower Austria forbidding 
manufacturers and tradesmen to sell nickel- 
plated cooking vessels. It is stated that vinegar 
and other acid substances dissolve nickel; and 
that this, in portions of one-seventh of a 
grain, causes vomiting, and is even more 
poisonous than copper. 



pACIFie R.URAI0 PRESS. 



48 




A. T. DEWEY. W. B. EWEK. 

Published by DEWEY & CO. 



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DEWEY & CO., Patint Solicitors. 

A. T. DBWBT. W. B. EWIR. O. B. STRONQ 

SAN FRANCISCO: 

Saturciay, January 15, 1887. 
TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



EDITORIALS.— The University; Double Callas, 41. 
The Weuk; Railroads Subject to Government Control; 
Irrijration at Sacramento; The Co-operative Bill, 48- 
Agricultural Review, 49. 

ILLUSTBATIONa.— Buildings of the State Uni- 
versity at Mt. Hamilton and "Berkeley, 41. Mertimcr 
Whitehead, Lei:turer N. G. P. of H., 44. James Lick, 
I'hilaiitropist, 53. 

CORKESPONDBNOE.— Shasta County Notes; Tuo- 
lumne ('ountv; Contra Costa County, 42. 

POULTRY YARD.— The I'ablo Poultry Yards, 42 

ARBORICULTURE.— Late or Early Planting, 42. 

UHBEP AND WOOL.— Uinta to Flock Owners; 
Tne Mohair .Market, 43. 

METEOROLOGICAL.— Pacific Coajt Records to 
Dec. 31, ISSC, 43. 

PATRONS OF HUSBANDRY.-Mortimer White- 
head; Good Words for St. Helena; Grange Klections; 
Grange Items; Installatiens; Corrected; Grange Work 
and Progress; Granj;ers* Business A830ciatii>n; Grang- 
ers' Bank; Orange Installation at Havwards, 44- 

THE HOiVIE CIRCLE.- To Whitticr on His Birth- 
day; The Sfnator's Liaughter, 46 Something for 
Nothing; "I Made that .Man What He Was," 47. 

THE YOUNG FOLKS' COLUMN. A Girls 
Experi.nce at School; Morro Notes, 4?. 

GOOD HEALTH. - Lanolin— A Ne* Oil; Dust and 
Dusting; Sleep a Preventive of Headache; Diphtheria 
and Manure Heaps; Deaths from Being Struck by Fall- 
ing Meteors, 47- 

DOMESTIC ECONOMY.- ToMakeSoft Soap; He 
moving Cake from Tins, Almond Paste; Velvet Pud. 
ding; Apple Fritters; Boiled S<iuash; Ou tage Pudding; 
Apple Custard Pie; Corn Pudding; Delicious Dish of 
Apples; Danger in Nickel. P. ated Ware, 47. 

THE VINEYARD.— Experiments in Methods of 
Fermentation , 50. 



Business Annoimoements. 

Stocktoa Combined Harvester and Agricultural Works. 
Horses— Theodore Skillmao, Petaluma, Cal. 
Pacific Nxiraery — F. Ludemann. 
Grape Seed— C. Mottier, Middletown, Cal. 
Poultry— Mrs. J. Ray ..or, Fruitvale, Cal. 
Books — Thompson, Brown Co., B3ston, Mass- 
Poultry— O. J. Albee, Santa Clara, Cal. 
Olive Trees- C. W. Crane, Oakland, Cal. 
Steam Heat Evaporators Batchelor & Wylie. 
Seeds — D. M. Ferry Son, Detroit, Mich. 
Seeds — AIneer Bros., Rockford, 111. 
Pumps— Byron Jackson. 
Horticulturist Wanted--L. 

Fruit Tree Seedlings— J. T. Bogue, Martinez, Cal. 
Real Estate— A. Leonard & Son, Sacramento. 

US' See Advertising Columns. 



The Week. 

We give this week a collection of statistics 
and deductions concerning the agricultural 
achievements of the last year, which we trust 
will be acceptable to our^readers both for pres- 
ent reading and for reference. The State has 
shown good growth daring the year and has 
disclosed symptoms of awakening and enterprise 
which promise much for the future. The 
southern counties have still enjoyed the lion's 
share of those who come seeking homes, and a 
most remarkable advancement has been made 
in wealth and population. The incoming host 
has, however, shown a greater disposition to look 
over the whole State than in previous years, 
and here and there in the central and north- 
ern parts of the State the advance in develop- 
ment and settlement has been considerable. It 
is to be expected that the recent awakening at 
various northern points, and the efforts to make 
the upper parts of the State better known, will 
result in a wider distribution of home-seekers 
aan has existed hitherto. 
The rain problem is still in abeyance. Com- 



ing storms are heralded from the north, and, 
according to prognostications, there should be a 
change in the weather this week, as the trouble 
among the elements at the northern stations 
has been considerable. It cannot come too 
soon. 

The Legislature is now at work, and bills are 
falling like the rain — we long for. Governor 
Bartlett was inaugurated and Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor Waterman installed on Saturday. In 
our next issue we shall begin our sketches of 
proposed laws on agricultural subjects, and 
shall expect to keep our readers informed on 
such matters during the session. 

Railroads Subject to Government 
Control. 

Last Monday the Senate proceeded to the 
consideration of the Interstate Commerce bill, 
and was addressed by Senators Beck and Cul- 
lom, in favor of the adoption of the conference 
report, and by Senator Stanford in opposition. 
Senator Stanford met the case squarely and 
with his acknowledged candor and ability. 
Among other things be said: 

" Railroad companies are organized under the 
geperal laws of different States. They have no 
exclusive privileges. They are associations 
made by the general laws— laws of which every 
citizen or any number of citizens may avail 
themselves equally with those forming the rail- 
road company. In the mere fact of associa- 
tions they may exist entirely without the aid of 
the State. The association is as natural as it is 
for one man to call in his neighbors to help him 
raise bis barn, or to roll a sawlog, or to any 
business not inconsistent with the rights of 
others. The State gives by virtue of the in- 
corporation laws nothing to that incorporation. 
Whatever of capital or labor that is contributed 
to them is entirely private. The ownership of 
the labor and capital provided is private; as 
much so as the banker's ownership of his 
money, the farmer's ownership of his farm, the 
teamster's ownership cf his team, and so on." 

This simply means that railroad property is 
strictly private property, and, like all other 
private property, is not subject to Government 
control and supervision. If this proposition is 
conceded, it cuts up root and branch all 
such legislation as that contempl.'^ted in this 
bill. The position is certainly untenable. The 
fact that corporations of this kind are found" 
ed upon franchises — that is, an endowment of 
powers and privileges immediately conferred 
by the law-making power of the (Jovernment — 
shows conclusively that it enters into the very 
intention of the law that this class of property 
is to be kept in some measure within the con- 
trol of the Government. That it is different in 
this respect from all other kinds of property. 
This is inherent in the very nature of the trans- 
action. What is it? A contract with the 
Government in which the corporation agrees, in 
consideration of certain immunities, to build 
and run a road a certain period of time and en- 
joy its legitimate profits. Now a farmer never 
made a contract with the Governmeut as to the 
opening and management of his farm. The 
house-builder, carpenter, merchant or shoe- 
maker never thinks of plying his vocation 
under a grant of privileges from the Govern- 
ment. They are strictly private owners. There 
is no limit to the duration of their powers. 

But when a corporation prays of a Legislat- 
ure a grant of powers — whether by general or 
special statute makes no difference — to perform 
a certain work, as to build a road, telegraph, 
bridge or ferry, it concedes as a party to the 
agreement that it is about to handle a class of 
property that is not like any other property; 
that, in short, it is quasi-public property, and 
could not come into existence without public 
permission, and could not continue in existence 
were that permission withdrawn. What the 
State creates, the State certainly has the power, 
to some extent, at least, to control. 
Were that not ao, the creature would 
be greater than its creator. The State 
does not by any law, general or special, build 
barns, houses, or sawmills. Were the State to 
extend any association doing this kind of busi- 
ness certain special immunities, then this class 
of business would cease to be exclusively private 
business and would be subject to Government 
control. Senator Stanford contends that the 
immunities and privileges granted to corporations 
are in consideration of the fact that their work 
is a public benefit. True, but how is the (Jov- 
ernment to secure a perpetuity of the benefit if 
it abdicates all right of control and supervision? 
AVhat promised to be a public benefit might, 
under bad or unscrupulous management, become 
a public oppression. The Government never 



takes snch risks. It cannot in the nature of 
things. The act would be suicidal. 

This statement of the relation of railroad 
property to the public is the doctrine of the 
law as solemnly announced by the highest judi- 
cature of the nation in what is popularly known 
as the "Granger Cases." These decisions 
should have put the question to rest. They are 
not ancient, mythical and traditional authority, 
black-letter law, or decisions rendered in an 
inchoate state of the railroad systems. They 
were rendered only about 1 or 11 years ago. 
The issue was then squarely made and elaborate- 
ly argued. No court ever existed that was 
more perfectly free from all suspicion of bias 
and prejudice. 

And it cannot be seriously alleged that the 
doctrine announced in the aforesaid cases leads 
in the least degree to the confiscation of this 
class of property. No one in his sober senses 
ever doubted for a moment that railroad proper- 
ty has been built and is owned by individuals, 
and that it should be as sacredly protected in 
all its legitimate uses as any other individual 
property. Hostile legislation may make this 
sort of property utterly valueless to the owners, 
but all will agree that such legislation would 
not only be impolitic but absolutely unjust. 
But there is not a word, not a shadow of a hint, 
in these cases to warrant such a conclusion. 
" A good government," says Chief Justice Waite 
in discussing the leading Granger case, " never 
puts forth extraordinary powers except under 
circumstances which require it. That govern- 
ment is the best which, while performing all 
its duties, interferes the least with the lawful 
pursuits of the people." 

That there is a liability of abuses growing out 
of the act that casts upon these corporations 
one of the great functions of government, is 
not strange in a world where every one works 
for his own personal interests. That there have 
been abuses to some extent is evidenced by the 
fact that there is scarcely a State that has not 
sought, by direct legislation or the creation of 
boards of commissioners, to check or prevent 
such evils. And what has been done by the 
States in lightening or making uniform and im- 
partial the burdens of the people without crip- 
pling the usefulness of these roads, is what is 
now sought to be attained by the bill before 
Congress over a wider expanse of territory. 

Irrigation at Sacramento. 

The subject of irrigation is coming up at Sac- 
ramento in a more temperate and therefore in 
a more promising condition than at recent ses- 
sions of the Legislature. It is reported that up 
to Wednesday four bills, each of considerabl e 
length, had been introduced in the Assembly. 
One by Mr. Wright, of Stanislaus, provides for 
the organization and government of irrigation 
districts, and for the acquisition and distribu- 
tion of water for irrigation purposes. It pro- 
vides for the application of the law of eminent 
domain for the condemnation of the existing 
water rights, and is in entire harmony with the 
recent decision of the Supreme Court on the 
irrigation question. It also provides a system 
of elections and assessments and the collection 
of revenues necessary to carry out the provis- 
ions of the Act. 

Mr. Butler, of Tulare, proposes to add a new 
section to the Political Code defining riparian 
rights. 

Mr. Shanahan, of Shasta, has a bill intending 
to do away with the Supreme Court decision, 
and provides for the distribution of water in 
just proportions. 

Mr. Bast, of Merced (whose name was incor- 
rectly spelled " Bjot" in our legislative list last 
week), has a bill providing for an irrigation 
commission, consisting of the Governor, Attor- 
ney-General, Surveyor-General and State Engi- 
neer, which shall divide the State into irriga- 
tion districts and organize the same with a 
view to the storage and distribution of water. 

The Citrus Show at Chicago. — Telegrams 
from Chicago announce that the managers of 
the Citrus Fair had decided to close the exhibi- 
tion Wednesday night. AH the surplus fruit 
had been used in replenishing the stock, which 
could not remain presentable much longer. 
Sealed bids had been invited for the entire lot 
of fresh fruit. The raisins, dried fruit, etc., 
were to be turned over to the Southern Pacific 
Immigration Commission for a permanent ex- 
hibit, and the parties in charge expected to be 
all on their homeward way by Thursday. 



[Jan. 15, 1887 

The Uo-operatlve Bill. 

Senator Stanford has prepared a bill to 
promote co-operation among workingmen that 
is worthy of serious consideration. It is no 
novel invention; can hardly be called an at- 
tempt at experimental legislation. It is mod- 
eled on the plan of the English Co-operation 
Act, which passed in 1832, and has from time 
to time been greatly improved by amendmentfa. 
The principle has worked successfully in En- 
gland. The wholesale and retail stores con- 
ducted on this plan amounted in 1S83 to 1304, 
with a membership of 680,165. There are also 
numerous associations of mechanics and manu- 
facturers along the same line. The same prin- 
ciple has struck root in France, though not 
quite so extensively. At the last report there 
were 74 co-operative societies in France, chiefly 
at Paris, consisting of jewelers, carpenters, fur- 
niture-workers, masons, painters, saddlers, 
tailors and other branches of mechanics and 
handicrafts. Many of these are improved and 
strengthened by incorporating the fraternal prin- 
ciple of insurance against sickness and death. 

The principle involved in this bill may in 
some degree help to solve the most troublous 
problems of the age. We have come into an 
era when evolution pauses to adjust itself to the 
new environments. The feudal age of vassal- 
age has been succeeded by a new class of bread- 
winners in the shape of wage-receivers. Labor 
no longer a fixture of the soil, a piece of the real 
estate, has gone into the world's market as a 
commodity for sale. In dense populations it is 
crowded, restless, discontented, and is steadily 
growing more conscious of its power and more 
bitter in its class prejudice. This is undoubt- 
edly a transitional state of things that time will 
solve, as it has many other perplexing problems, 
but in the meantime and as tentative to such 
solution, it is clear the day has dawned to 
study the questions of co-operation and 
equalization of burdens. The issue is inevi- 
table and must be met. In a country where 
the men who labor are free to think and utter 
thoughts, and where the law-making power is 
largely in their hands, it cannot be kept down. 
As well attempt to hold back the swell of the sea 
with the palm of the hand or stop the rampages 
of a volcano with magnetic passes. It cannot 
be adjourned to a more convenient season, nor 
soothed with pleasant embrocations. The 
question is upon us, whether there is in theory 
a common good and whether labor constructs 
and maintains society for its own degradation. 
Now, whatever measure tends in the least de- 
gree to throw light upon this dark and appar- 
ently threatening question is too precious to the 
human weal to be lost. It may prove to be the 
tiny mustard seed which grew into a great tree, 
where the fowls of the air came and lodged. 

It is true that the co-operative principle has 
not so far been a success in this country. But 
there is a cause for it. The New Harmony 
Community, established by Robert Dale Owen 
in Indiana, and the Brook Farm in Massachu- 
setts, and other experiments of a similar char- 
acter, were tainted with communism. There is 
no redemption for society in that direction. 
To think so is ukiu to the craze that seeks for 
perpetual motion or the art of turning cobble- 
stones into diamonds. The desire for personal 
ownership of property is an ineradicable in- 
stinct and will last as long as human nature re- 
mains as it is. 

.Tust why this bill should have a clause ex- 
empting co-operative societies from the strict 
construction of the law is not apparent. It is 
under such a construction we all make contracts 
and do business; why this special favoritism ? 
Then this bill is for the purpose of encouraging 
the formation of co-operative associations in the 
District of Columbia. This is proper enough, 
but it should be amended so as to confine the 
operations of such societies to that district. 
The reason is obvious. An association formed 
in the District of Columbia under its operation 
would be under no territorial limitation. It 
could do business anywhere in the United 
States. The legal residence would be in the 
District. Now, as this bill clearly contemplates 
the co-operation of capital as well as labor, sup- 
pose an association should go into the telegraph 
and railroad business. What would be the re- 
sult ? It would not be subject to State control 
and could always play the dodge of transferring 
its litigations to the federal courts, causing 
more delay and greater expense. The principle 
is a beneficent one, and cannot some measure 
be devised by which its blessings will fall like 
the sweet sunlight upon the rich and poor over 
all these broad lands ? 



Jan. 15, 1887.] 



f ACiFie f^uraid press. 



Agricultural Review. 

Leading Articles of California Production 
In 1886. 

[Written for the Kural Prbss by J. R. F,] 
The records of the agricultural production 
of California for 1886 contain many facta of 
general interest, and no doubt a conden&ed 
compilation of statistics, with deductions there- 
from and sketches of tendencies in the course 
of trade, etc., will be found acceptable to the 
industrial reader and to others who take inter- 
est and pride in the growth of the State. It is 
to be regretted that returns for the aggregate 
production of the State in some important arti- 
cles are not available, and in lack of them the 
receipts of such produce in San Francisco must 
still be relied upon as an indication of amounts. 

Wheat. 

The market opened the year at a decline on 
December prices. The general tendency was 
lower up to April, when a sharp decline set in, 
owing to exaggerated crop reports being set 
afloat. The decline was continued up to June, 
when a steadier feeling set in, owing to the 
Rural Press publishing a crop report, with 
complete returns from each county (and this esti- 
mate has been proven to be only about 50,000 
tons in excess of the actual out-turn), which 
made the crop not more than one-half of the 
other published reports. In July the lowest 
prices were touched, since when there have 
been advances with setbacks, until at the close 
of the year No. 1 shipping sold up to $1.60 per 
cental — an advance of fully 3.5 cents per cental 
on .July's opening sales. The causes which con- 
duced to make the advance, this paper gave in 
July, and, as other facta were obtained, they 
were given from time to time, so that the 
Rural Presm patrons have themselves to blame 
if they sold at a sacrifice. The big crop reports 
sent a large fleet of vessels to this port, which 
sent freights down. The wheat crop would have 
been very largfi, had it not been for the hot 
north winds in June that almost destroyed the 
crops in Colusa, Butte, Sutter, Yolo and other 
central counties. The year closed on a very 
strong market under light stocks in this State, 
at the East and throughout the civilized world. 
The outlook for good prices for 1887 could not 
be better. 

The receipts at and exports from this port 
last year were as follows in centals: 

Receipts. Exports. 

January 1,133443 1,168,233 

February 1,714,520 1,810,546 

March 1,300,445 1,669,553 

April 1,139,721 1,036,035 

May 1,187,823 829,564 

June 811,500 1,156,720 

Ju'y 702.775 754.422 

August 1,256,058 853,080 

September 2,102,995 1,841,998 

October 1,369,763 1,255,766 

November 1,940,979 1,888,474 

December 1,227,013 1,567,764 

Totals 15,887,037 15,832,155 

1885 11,853,200 11,727,895 

The exports of flour last year aggregated 1,- 
108,754 bbls, which reduced to wheat gives 3,- 
318,262 ctls, making a total export for the year 
of 19,150,417 ctls, equal to 957,526 short tons. 
The exports of wheat by sea last year were 
635,748 short tons to Great Britain and 96,804 
short tons to PVance. Of the latter shipments, 
all were made the lust half of the year, except- 
ing 6605 short tons. Of the flour exports, 
469,385 bbls went to Great Britain, 421,498 to 
China and the remainder to Japan, Hawaiian 
islands, British Columbia, Society islands, Cen- 
tral America, Mexico, Panama, Australia, 
Saigon, Siberia, etc. 

Barley. 

The market ruled very strong and high up to 
June, owing to light supplies and a very large 
increased consumption owing to more railroad 
construction and a larger number of transac- 
tions in other trades. Published estimates of a 
very large crop in this State, placed at 900,000 
tons, operated against the market as harvesting 
commenced, notwithstanding the Rural Press' 
estimate in June was not over 400,000 tons. 
Prices in June opened low for new and fell below 
90 cents for No. 1 feed, but when the crop was 
found not to be even 400,000 tons, together with 
a large consumptive and export demand, prices 
began to recover, which were still further ad- 
vanced by dry weather and a very large short 
interest. The market closed the year very 
strong at $1.15 to $l.l7i for No. I feed. The 
supply held by farmers on farms is less^tban on 
January 1, 1886. 

The receipts at and exports from this port 
last year were as follows in centals: 

Receipts. Exports. 

January 34. 180 25,866 

February 52.185 12,350 

March 42,55' 11,281 

April 88.859 5,571 

May 38.545 5.864 

June 125,695 9 327 

July 197.284 79.i6£ 

August 295.580 3 '.734 

September 425,657 120,991 

October 429,668 154,907 

November 257,561 112,923 

December 182,256 87,477 

Totals 2,170,071 661,462 

1885 1,014,490 185,297 

There was also shipped overland 249,372 ctls, 
{^gainst 92,760 ctls lagt year. Of the exports, 



391,151 ctls were exported to Great Britain, 
8103 ctls last year. 'There was received from 
Oregon, etc., last year, 28,318 ctls, which was 
not included in the tabulated receipts. 

Oats. 

The market, under light supplies and a good 
demand, ruled high and very strong up to 
June, when an easier feeling set in, resulting in 
lower prices in July, which was followed by 
further declines into August. From August 
the market began to improve, with a slow in- 
crease in prices, which brought about higher 
rates at the close of the year. The crop of the 
coast is less than that of 1885, but the importa 
tion of Nebraska oats operated against values 
to some extent, notwithstanding their inferior 
quality. 

The receipts last year were as follows in 
centals: 

Ctls. 

January 769 

February 940 

March 1,360 

April 2,103 

May 4,660 

Jin^2 3.177 



Ctls. 

July 17.372 

August 36.035 

September 18,300 

October 19.317 

November 5.980 

December 12,322 



Total 122,335 

1885 157,895 

The receipts from Oregon, etc., last year ag- 
gregated 379,957 ctls. 

Corn. 

The market ruled strong and high, under 
light supplies, up to harvest, since when lower 
prices have ruled. Heavy importations of 
western had to be made so as to meet the con- 
sumption, but, notwithstanding the large im- 
ports, September found us with only moderate 
stocks. Since harvest, low prices have pre- 
vailed; but the year closed with a steadier tone. 

Receipts of California corn last year were as 
follows in centals: 

Ctls. 

July 6,378 

August 12,741 

.September 2c,666 

October 18,879 

November 16,329 

December 26,655 



Ctls 

January 10,206 

February 10,465 

March 15.604 

April 16,329 

May 46.475 

June 25,858 



Total 227,785 

1885 57.509 

Rye. 

The market has varied very little, owing to 
the light crop and still lighter consumotion. 

The receipts last year aggregated 24,424 ctls, 
against 61,301 ctls in 1885. 

Buckwheat. 
The market held steady throughout the year, 
due to the demand and production being about 
equal. 

The receipts of last year aggregated 7688 ctls, 
against 2464 ctls in 1885. 

Baes. 

The market opened dull, weak and inactive, 
but under a concentration of stocks an advance 
began to manifest itself by March, which be- 
came more marked by published exaggerated 
statements of the prospective cereal crops. 
Prices were by May doubled, but as the true 
condition of the crops became known, to- 
gether with freer outside selling, the " bag 
pool " had to lower prices, which by July were 
fully one-third less than the highest prices 
touched. Since then there was a gradual sag- 
ging to the close of the last month of the year. 
'The market closed fairly steady at the lower 
prices 

Hay. 

The market ruled very high up to June under 
light stocks and a good demand. In June ah 
easier feeling set in, which, as supplies came 
forward more liberally, resulted in lower price; 
but still choice to extra choice was well main- 
tained by reason of the light crop of these 
grades, notwithstanding the crop of fair to 
good was the largest known for years. Dry 
weather and a large increased consumption kept 
prices fairly steady toward the close of the 
year, with a strong closing in December. 

The receipts of hay and straw last year were 
as follows in tons: 

Hay. 

January 5,115 

February 7.769 

March 6,472 

April 5.659 

May 6,113 

June 9.215 
uly ' 11.832 

August 15.707 

September 10,455 

October 9.991 

November 5,526 

December 5.528 



Straw. 

207 
234 
177 

259 
245 
201 

341 
588 
1.013 
383 
251 
359 



Totals 99.382 4,558 

1885 79.779 3.634 

Beans. 

The receipts of beans last year were as follows 
in sacks: 



Sacks. 

July 6,707 

August 8,104 

September 13.114 

October 56,689 

November 150,897 

December 116,070 



Sacks. 

January 30,278 

February 12,589 

March 20.419 

April 23,004 

May 10,600 

June 9,864 

Totals 458.335 

1885 330,600 

Potatoes. 

The market has held to strong and good re- 
munerative prices throughout the year. The 
crop of 1886 was considerably below that of 
1885, with the quality generally poor. These 
gumbiced operated tQ maintain values, the la^t 



half of the year, with a higher range in Decem- 
ber for the more choice varieties. Utah and 
also Oregon contributed to this market but 
slightly, owing to the light supplies to draw 
from in those markets. 

The receipts of potatoes last year were as fol 
lows in sacks: 



Sacks. 

January 82,846 

February 81,902 

March 77,146 

April 49.344 

May 59,828 

June 73.617 



Sacks. 

July 75.687 

August 74.342 

September 94.918 

October 103,661 

November 97.377 

December 94,181 



Total 964, 849 

1885 923.629 

There was also received from Oreeon 116,734 
dacks, and about 14,500 sacks from Utah. 

Onions. 

High prices and a good demand last season 
stimulated production, which gave a large crop 
for 1886, causing prices the last half of the year 
to rule low, but with a stronger closing under 
lessening supplies and a good demand. 

The receipts of onions last year were as fol- 
lows in sacks: 



Sacks. 

January 5,746 

February 4.556 

March 3.041 

.April 2,723 

May 8,914 

June 11,943 



Sacks. 

July 11,912 

August 13.979 

September 18,354 

October 15,264 

November 9,020 

December 9.063 



Total 114,515 

1885 83,874 

Receipts from Oregon aggregated 4096 sacks. 
Butter. 

The market opened the year strong, but, 
under the best of pasturage, the production soon 
outran the consumption, which, as the season 
advanced, resulted in a lower range of values. 
Prices fell to such low figures that heavy pack- 
ing was the result. For a time these steadied 
values, only to be followed by another 
drop when packing stopped. The stock of solid 
butter, and also pickled butter, was never 
known to be so large as they were at the close 
of the year, and this, too, in the face of a large 
increase in the consumption. The heavy stock 
caused low prices to obtain at the close, with a 
decided selling pressure setting in. 

The receipts of butter last year were as fol- 
lows in pounds: 

Californian. Eastern. 

January 516,600 56,400 

February 749,500 47,200 

March 1,027,400 62,200 

April 1,115,000 11,800 

.May 1,208,900 38,400 

June 1,072,100 105,700 

July 728,600 73.400 

Augu.,t 708,300 101,500 

September 973,600 54.500 

October 943.900 48,600 

November 494,200 16,500 

December 412,400 11,400 



Totals 9.955.500 627,800 

1885 8,019,600 894,515 

1884 10,780,300 535,250 

From Oregon, receipts aggregated 53,400 lbs. 
Cheese. 

Receipts last year were as follows in pounds: 
The market ruled strong throughout the 

year, with a strong closing, owing to a lighter 
production and a good demand. 

t^alifornian. Eastern. 

January 178,100 49.700 

February 207,800 31,300 

March 424,500 68,700 

April 523,800 33.600 

May 568,000 44,000 

June 424.500 18,600 

July 427,500 15 000 

August 336.500 43.800 

September 357,100 49.300 

October 294,400 80.000 

November 247,800 77,000 

December 113,400 37,100 



Total? 4,103,400 548,100 

1885 3657.500 394.000 

1884 6,440,300 475.510 

From Oregon, 35,700 fbs were received. 
Eggs. 

By reason of low freights from the East, the 
receipts of western egga were very heavy 
throughout the year, causing prices to rule 
low. Even at the low prices, values favored 
buyers, excepting during the hotter months, 
when choice or gilt edged eggs were in active 
demand and commanded quite an advance. 
The market closed the year weak and in buy 
ers' favor. 

Receipts last year were as follows in dozens: 
Californian. Eastern. 

January 127,200 22,500 

February 185140 

March 260,089 65,071 

April 210,810 332,180 

May 204,730 420,190 

June 138.550 123,420 

July 127,790 190,370 

August 112,170 i37.'io 

September 79640 275.020 

October 63,790 254,030 

November 60,380 278,910 

December 96.750 94040 



Totals 1,667.030 2,192,900 

1885 2,778,281 1,774515 

1884 2,980,254 i,6io,oio 

Receipts from Oregon aggregated 47,820 
dozen. 

Poultry. 

The market for all hinds of poultry averaged 
higher thap in 1885, with choice, well.condi- 



tioned fowls always in demand at an advance 
on the highest quotations. The consumption is 
said to be all of 25 per cent more than it was 
in 1885. 

Uve-Stock. 
Owing to good pasturage and a mild winter, 
there were throughout the year heavy offerings 
of beef cattle and mutton sheep, with the prices 
averaging below those of 1885. The low prices 
even ruled up to the close of the year, which is 
something never before known. The increase 
in the number of cattle and sheep is said to be 
quite large. Hogs ruled strong up to harvest, 
since which time a lower range of prices have 
obtained in sympathy with lower prices for 
hog products, and also a free selling pressure. 
Prices ruled the last half of 1886 lower than for 
several years past. In horses there has been 
more trading, with an advance in prices toward 
the close of the spring, due to a good demand 
for draft horses for fartr and also railroad work. 
In this city the demand has ruled good for sin- 
gle-footers and general utility horsep, with good 
prices obtained. The year closed weak for 
draft horses, but firm for matched horses, gen- 
eral utility horses and single-footers. 

Hops. 

Under the low freights overland that obtained 
last spring, all the hops on this coast were sold 
and sent East. Considerable were sold as low 
as one cent per lb. As summer approached 
values began to appreciate, owing to reports of 
heavy damage to the crop in New York, and 
also a lighter crop on this coast and in Europe; 
and as these reports became verified, quite an 
impetus was given to values, sending them up 
to high figures for both old and new for future 
delivery. Many parcels bought in this mar- 
ket at from 1 to 2'^ cents per lb. were sold at 
from 9 to 15 cents per lb. The crop of 1886 
was placed at, on an average, from 22^ to 25 
cents per lb. Up to the close of the year fully 
45,500 bales were marketed, leaving only about 
15,000 bales as a carry-over. The consumption is 
increasing quite steadily. 

Seeds. 

The mustard crop was unusually heavy, but 
the bulk was marketed at the East at fair 
prices. The market closed steady. In other 
seeds the demand proved less than in 1885, 
causing a lower range of values, with a larger 
carry-over stock at the close of the year. 
Fruits. 

The crop of small fruits was very large, but 
canners were liberal buyers, which kept prices 
fairly well maintained. Of the larger fruit, the 
crops were all large, excepting apricots. Owing 
to th« light crop, apricots were bought up and 
prices advanced to high figures. 'The crop of 
cherries, peaches, plums, prunes, etc., was quite 
large, and, notwithstanding free shipments to 
the East, prices ruled, on an average, low. The 
crop of apples was very large, causing low 
prices to obtain. Considerable quantities of 
the pears and apples were wormy, and had to 
be sold at concessions to effect sales. The grape 
crop was unusually heavy, allowing heavy ship- 
ments to the East. At times our market, un- 
der heavy rpceipts, became glutted, and no 
reasonable offer was refused by dealers, so as 
to clean up. 

The low freights to the East admitted of the 
shipping of oranges on a liberal scale, causing 
the market to be cleaned up at an early day at 
higher prices. The crop this year was larger 
than in 1885, but owing to a better outlet, 
prices are better maintained. The year closed 
the market in better shape than did 1885. 

The overland shipments last year aggregated 
22,793,989 lbs. of green fruits and 5,830,200 
lbs. of dried. Of the green fruits, 19,413,700 
lbs. were shipped from Sacramento and 2,211,- 
200 lbs. from Sm Jose. Of the dried fruits, San 
Francisco shipped 327,680 lbs. and San Jose 
1,861,800 lbs. While the rates on fruit to the 
East have been reduced since the opening of 
this trade, they are still considered rather ex- 
orbitant. The season's rates were as follows: 
Passenger time to New York, S800 per car; 
slow freight, $400; passenger time to Chicago, 
$600; slow freight, $.300. The Sacramento 
Horticultural Convention, through a committee 
appointed for the purpose, endeavored to have 
the rates reduced as follows: Paesenger train 
time to New York, Philadtflphia and Boston, 
$400 per car; passenger tr.iin to Chicago. .S300; 
slow freight to Chicago, $200; and that 10 cars 
comprise a .$200 fruit train. While such sweep- 
ing reductions, it was stated, could not then be 
entertained, there was at the same time ex- 
pressed a willingness to attach fruit cars to 
regular passenger trains as far as Chicago at 
$500 per car, or to carry freight at .§250 per car. 
Further than this, the statement was made it 
would be necessary to get the concurrence of 
the Eastern lines. Subsequently, the Commit- 
tee on Transportation appointed by the fruit- 
growers at the State Convention received in- 
formation to the effect that the Union Pacific 
had agreed to pro rate on fruit transportation 
on any terms agreeable to the Southern and 
Central Pacific. Mr. Huntington then favored 
the 1.300 rate to Chicago, and $400 to New 
York, fast time, and lO car trains. Arrange- 
ments could be made on that basis at San Fran- 
cisco. These concessions on the part of the rail- 
road companies will undoubtedly encourage 
fruit-shippers to largely increase their business 
next season with the Eastern markets. 

Pried Fruits and Nuts. 
Low freights to the East last spring allowed 
heavy shipments of dried fruits and nuts, which 
cleaned the market up of all kinds, advancing 
prices for the better kind, so that the new crop 



50 



fACIFie F^URAb pRESS 



[Jan. 15, 1887 



came in on a bare market and at good prices. 
The crop of dried fruits, excepting prunes, was 
lighter than last year, which, with heavy or- 
ders from the East, caused higher prices to obtain 
than for several seasons past, with a strong 
closing at the close of the year. The nut crop, 
taken as a whole, was lighter than in 1885, 
which, with a good demand, caused higher 
prices to rule. Free importation of Chili wal- 
nuts operated somewhat against this variety, 
but at the close prices were stronger. The 
honey crop was larger and of better quality 
than that of 1885, but owing to stocks being 
well cleaned up, combined with a fair export 
demand, prices did not recede to the extent 
that it was claimed they would. The year 
closed on a dull but strong market, with light 
stocks and still lighter supplies to draw from. 
Beeswax ruled fairly steady throughout the 
year. In raisins there was a very large in- 
creased pack, with the quality very consider- 
ably above any former season. Owing to the 
better reputation of California raisins, there 
has not been any difficulty in working off the 
product at good prices, when compared with 
former seasons. Eastern commercial papers 
claim that California raisins will soon outrank 
the foreign and sell for more money side by 
side. The year closed on a fairly firm market, 
both here and at the East. 

The following statistics aud remarks relating 
to the dried fruit, raisin, prune, almond, wal- 
nut, peanut, comb and extracted honey crops 
of California for the year 1886, are from the an- 
nual circular of George W. Meade & Co., of 
this city. 

THE PRODUCT OF 1886. 

Lbs. 

Honey, extracted 6,000,000 

Honey, comb 800,000 

Iteeswax 80,000 

French Prunes 2,000,000 

German Prunes 125,000 

Apples, sun-dried 300,000 

Peaches 750,000 

Plums 500,000 

Pears 50,000 

(jrapes 175,000 

Apricots 150,000 

Nectarines, sun-dried 30,000 

Figs, sun-dried 150,000 

Apples, evaporated 500,000 

Apricots, evaporated and S. D. (bleached) 450,000 

Peaches, evaporated (peeled) 100,000 

Peaches, evaporated (unpeeled) 200,000 

Plums, evaporated 85,000 

Nectarines, evaporated 25,000 

Walnuts 750,000 

Almonds 600,000 

Peanuts 275,000 

Raisins, 20-lb. boxes 703,000 

We estimate the total raisin product of 1886 
at 703,000 boxes, and apportioned as follows: 

Boxes. 

Fresno District 225,000 

Tulare District 8,000 

Riverside District 185,000 

Orange and Santa Ana District 160,000 

San Diego District 25,000 

San Bernardino Co. (outside of Riverside 

District) 10,000 

Yolo and Solano 7S.ooo 

Scattering— Yuba, Butte, Sacramento, etc. . . 15,000 



Total 703,000 

The raisin shipments overland for the fiist 
11 months in 1886 were as follows in pounds: 

From Lbs. 

San Francisco 1,479,230 

Sacramento 1,712,070 

Stockton 1 , 466, 740 

Marysville 93.47° 

Colton 1,019,960 

Los Angeles 5,832,600 

Tola' 11,604,070 

Oranges. 

The shipments of oranges out of the State 
overland were as follows in pounds: 

Lbs. 

December, 1885 44.670 

January, 1886 1,152,920 

February 6,342,100 

March 4,700,810 

April 7.050,380 

May 5,665,900 

June 1,479,070 

[uly 103,130 



Total 26,538,980 

1885 23.33S.516 

Of the shipments last year 21,360,320 fta 

were billed from Los Angeles and 5,137,210 

from Colton. 

Vegetables. 
The tomato crop was very large, but canners 
bought freely to fill heavy contract orders. The 
crop of other vegetables was (juite large, but the 
consumption was free, which kept prices from 
going below 1885 prices. 

Wine. 

J. Gundlach & Co., of this city, have esti- 
mated the yield of wine in this State for 1886 
at 19,500,000 gallons, credited to the following 
counties: 

Counties. Gals. 

Napa 4,800,000 

Los Angeles and Sin Bernardino 4.200,000 

Sonoma 3,100,000 

F'resno and San Joaquin 2,000,000 

Santa Clara and Santa Cruz 1,700,000 

Contra Costa and .Alameda 1,200,000 

Sacramento, Tehama and Solano 2,000,000 

Placer, Yuba, Yolo and El Dorado 500,000 



Total yield 19,500,000 

About one-seventh has been converted into 
brandy. The season was favorable for a good 
return, and the result was up to the general ex- 



pectation. Messrs. Gundlach & Co., in a circu- 
lar issued by them, state: " The production of 
sweet wines has been much restricted, owing 
to low prices. Ports, sherries, etc., will there- 
fore not be plentiful. The proportion of red 
and white wine will be as two to one. The 
abundant crop of light wines of 1884 has grad- 
ually found its way into the hands of the trade, 
and they seem to be well appreciated. There 
are no stocks of any consequence of 18S4 and 
1885 in growers' cellars. San Francisco mer- 
chants and shippers control the bulk of the 
stocks. Shipments overland and by sea last 
year were 5,217,246 gallons, of which quantity 
5,063,413 gallons went to the Plastern States. 

Wool. 

The following review of the wool trade for 
the past year has been furnished by George 
Abbott, of the Wool Exchange: 

Spring Clip Quotations — . 
Choice Northern (Humboldt aud Mendo- 
cino) 22(5(25 

Good Northern (Red Bluff, etc.) 19(0:21 

Defective Northern I5@i7 

Good to Choice San Joaquin i5@i 

(iood San Joaquin (12 months) 15(3*17 

Southern Coast. I2j4^,;i5 

Fall Clip Quotations — 
Choice Northern (Humboldt and Mendo- 
cino) 20((?,22 

Good Northern i5@i 

San Joaquin j^@j6 

Heavy Northern and Southern 11(2)13 

(Oregon Quotations — . 

Choice \'alley 23@25 

Choice Eastern 20@.23 

Good Eastern i8@i7 

Freights During the Past Year — 
Grease wool K(«'ic per pound by rail. 
Grease wool ic per pound by sailing vessel. 
Grease wool $3(5^5 per ton by steamer. 
Scoured wool 'A((>'i'Ac per pound by rail. 
Scoured wool $3(0(5 per ton by steamer. 
Stocks are mostly Fall wool from Northern 
counties. 

WOOL I'RODtJCTION. 



Ill HE "V^'J^EiYAF^D. 



Experiments on Methods of Fer- 
mentation. 



University 



Experiment Station, 
No. 63. 



Bulletin 



Receipts at 
San Francisco. Bags. 

ianuary 282 
ebruary 35 

March 2,111 

April 15,140 

May 16,65s 

June 12,832 



Total 94.240 

Pounds 

Spring wool, 59,124 bags 18,328,440 

Spring wool shipped from interior 4 984,330 



Receipts at 
San Francisco. Big: 

July .... 8,100 

August 4 969 

September 12, 199 

October 17.469 

November 3S'6 

December 932 



Total spring production 23,312,770 

Fall wool, 35,iifi bags 11.763.860 

Fall wool, shipped from interior i 734,630 



Total fleece wool 36,811,260 

Pulled wool shipped from San Francisco 
and interior 1,697,900 



Total production of California 38 509,160 

On hand December 31, 1885 2000,000 

Received from Oregon, 21,565 bags 6,469 500 

Foreign wool received, 493 bags 246,500 



Grand total 47,225,160 

EXPORTS. 

Per rail, including shipments from interior. 31 073.520 

.Sailing vessels 499, 

Steamers 3,011.249 

Total shipments 34.583 450 

On hand December 31, i886, abou' 4 500,000 

Value of exports $5,500,000 

N. B.— Difference between receipts and exports 
arises from consumption of local mills and wool on 
hand awaiting shipment in the grease or .scoured. 
Foreign wool is chiefly from Australia in transit to 
Eastern markets. The weights of above are gross. 
The tare on bags received is 3 lbs. each. 

PRODUCTION FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 

Lbs. 

1854 175,000 

1855 300,000 

1856 600,000 

1857 1,100,000 

1858 1,428,000 

1859 2,378,000 

1860 3.055.375 

1861 3,721,998 

1862 5,990,300 



1863 6,268,480118 



Lbs. 

1871 22,187,200 

1872 24,255.500 

1873 32.155,200 

1874 39,356,800 

1875 43,532,200 

1876 56,551,000 

1877 53.110,700 

1878 40,862,100 

1879 46,904,400 



1864 7,923,670 

1865 8,949,931 

1866 8,532,047 

1867 10,288,600 

1868 14.232,657 

1869 i5.4'3 970 

1870 20,072,660 



.46,074,200 



i£8i 43,204,800 

1882 40,527. 100 

1883 40,848,700 

'884 37.415.300 

1885 36,561,300 

1886 38,509,200 



Goats for Milk. 

Editors Pre.ss: — Please inform me what kind of 
goats are the best for milk, and where they can be 
had. Old Suhsckiber. 

Who has goats for milk and who will write 
us about them ? 



A Fine Floodgate. — Our friend L. F. Monl- 
ton, of Colusa, has been building a two-arched 
floodgate, 12 feet wide, which he regards as the 
finest in the State. He expects it to carry 
water enough, six feet deep, from the river just 
below Butte City, to irrigate throughout the 
year a vast extent of outside land belonging 
to himself and others. As it is in a very deep 
slough, its completion will involve but a small 
outlay. 

OKE(iON Wheat Fields never looked better 
at this time of year than they now appear — so 
says the Willamette Farmer of the 7th instant. 



In view of the great interest attaching to the 
determination of the effect of various methods 
of fermentation upon the resulting wines, a 
series of experiments with one and the same 
kind of grape, treated differently both in respect 
to temperature and the appliances used, was 
carried out at the Vitioultural Laboratory with 
the results given below. 

These experiments were all conducted within 
the limits of temperature adapted to " high fer- 
mentation," since the question of how best to 
manage the fermentation at the prevailing vin- 
tage temperature of California is the one hav- 
ing the greatest practical interest. As no means 
were at hand for maintaining a temperature suf- 
ficiently low for " low fermentations," proper, 
these were omitted, but it is intended to ar- 
range for such experiments next season. 

It should be distinctly understood that these 
few experiments were selected from the large 
number of possible ones, in order to test the in- 
fluence of certain conditions upon the composi 
tion and quality of red wines, so as to deduce 
therefrom principles that shall apply to large 
as well as small-scale practice, when allowance 
is made for the known difference of circum 
stances in each case. 

The grapes used are a very good article of 
second-crop Zinfandel, courteously donated by 
Mr. J. Galle^os, of Mission San .lose. About 
one and one-sixth tons were sent, in University 
basket crates. They arrived in excellent condi 
tion ; the berries were rather small and the 
bunches quite loose, but thoroughly sound 
taste agreeably sweet, and juice abundant. The 
composition of the latter was as follows : 



Solid contents by spindl" 21.05 

Sugar by copper test 19-75 

Acid .' 65 

Ash 27 

Nine different samples were fermented, un 
der the following conditions: 

(A.) In a hot chamber kept at a temperature 
ranging from 98 degrees to 102 degrees, two batches 
of about 63 pounds each; one (No. 557) left entirely 
of)en in the tub; the other (No. 556) covered with a 
" floating top" that rose and tell with the pomace, 
screening it from access of air. Both were subjected 
to " foulage" or stirring. 

(B. ) In a room kept at a temperature ranging 
from 72 degrees to 75 degrees: five 50-gallon tanks, 
each charged with about 230 pounds, nearly fiUini,' 
the tanks, and arranged as follows: 

No. 558. Mash put in in three successive por- 
tions, kept separate by a lattice framework wedged 
in place, thus forcibly keeping the pomace sub- 
merged and divided into three separate portions — 
according to Ferret's system; the uppermost frame 
being about two inches below the surface of the 
must before fermentation. Tank covered. 

No. 559. Mash put in at once and the pomace 
kept submerged about two inches by means of a 
single Ferret's frame, as practiced to some extent 
at Fresno and elsewhere; no cover. 

No. 560. Mash left uncovered aad subjected to 
frequent " foulage" or stirring, at least three times a 
day, during fermentation; a common French and 
Californian practice. 

No. 561. Mash covered with a "floating cover, " 
rising and falling with the pomace, any frotn on up- 
per side being washed off; stirred three times a diy; 

French method, and adopted at the Viticullural 
Laboratory. 

No. 563. Grapes put in whole, stems and all. to 
be gradually crushed by means of a cross-peg 
stirrer, used energetically three times a day; no cov- 
A Burgundy method, used at several Cahfornia 
wineries; known as " Morel process." 

No. 564. A tub charged with about 140 pounds 
of mash, and then left to itself, cap, vinegar-flies and 
.all; without stirring or cover; the old Californian, or 
"go-as-you-please," method. 

(C ) In the cellar of the laboratory kept at a 
steady temperature of 62 degrees. 

No. .562. Fifty-gallon tank charged like the rest 
with 230 pounds of grape mash, provided with a 
"floating cover," and stirred three times daily. 

lu all cases the temperature was ascertained 
thrice daily; during the hight of fermentation 
every few hours; and in the tanks provided 
with frames the temperature of the top liquid, 
and of the pomace beneath each frame, was taken 
separately, in order to follow the exact course 
of fermentation. Similar observations were 
made every morning in the tanks subjected to 
stirring, so as to ascertain the temperature of 
the top and bottom layers of the pomace cap 
formed during the night, and that of the liquid 
beneath. 

The details of the fermentations, however in- 
structive, are too lengthy to be given in this 
place, and will be found fully recorded in the 
forthcoming report for the year 1886. It need 
only be taid that while No. 556, fermenting at 
100°, went dry within 48 hours, No. 562. at 62°, 
required ten days. Of the rest. No. 560, the 
open tank subjected to frequent stirring, went 
through most rapidly and energetically. 

Composition of the Wines. 

The table below shows the composition of 
the wines resulting from the several fermenta- 
tions. They were all analyzed, and their color 
determined, within a few days after pressing, 
the murk being filtered for the purpose. 



Cr. (3\ C7N Ov 0^'j\ cn t/i 

(0 4-^ CO OOVJ 0\ 

? S o 2 2 5' 5 o o 

E. S c c ^ a c c 

<H -S. ■r'S -.WW 

cs - Ci ^ ' n ^ ~ 

D. o O a — . — • 

-o 3; - o ""-Era- 



•jsqmnisj 



Q 
O 

S 
•a 



TO 



? c ; 



O 00 000 \0 *o O O 



M Kl '-Mi K O O OOJJ^ 
Ovvj ^ Cvvj O M Ui 



•amn|oy\^ Xg 



auEiJEX SB ppv 



■tllUUBX 



'XtjSUSIUJ 



As regards, first, the aicoholic contents of the 
several wines, it will be noted that the same 
percentage was obtained in six out of the nine; 
while three, viz., Nos. 559, 563 and 564, cor- 
responding respectively to the single-frame, 
Morel, and " old-style " processes, show a de- 
ficiency which does not differ widely for the 
three, being not quite one per cent. 

In the single-frame process, a relatively thin 
layer of liquid was exposed to the air, constant- 
ly agitated by the gas coming from below, and 
heated by its position just over the hot cap. 
The alcohol simply evaporated from this iso- 
lated portion of the wine, and 'where this mode 
of fermentation is practiced on the large scale I 
have sometimes found this layer so warm that 
toward the end of the fermentation the bulk of 
its alcohol was gone and it had a vapid. Hit 
taste, often more of vinegar than of alcohol. 

In the case of the old-style process, also, it is 
easy to see where the loss of alcohol occurs. It 
is here the hot pomace cap, offering a large sur- 
face to the air and kept drenched with the fer- 
menting liquid by the bubbling up from below, 
which assists the evaporation. That the latter 
is acconipanied by its transformation into 
vinegar is apparent to the nostrils so soon as 
the first violent stage of the fermcn ation is 
past. 

In the case of the " Morel process," the 
cause of the loss of alcohol is not so obvious. 
It must be partially accounted for by the 
abundant stirring and high temperature; but 
it is possible that from some cause a part of 
the sugar may have been converted into some 
other compound than alcohol. 

A somewhat unexpected result is the fact 
that the two hot fermentations (556 and .557) 
yielded the same amount of alcohol as those 
fermented at a much lower temperature. The 
obvious explanation is, that the short duration 
of these fermentations balanced the influence 
of the high temperature as compared with those 
in the slower fermentations, in which the op- 
portunity for evaporation lasted longer. It 
will be highly iijteresting to compare, hereafter, 
the other products formed alongside of the al- 
cohol in the three sets of fermentations. 

As regards, next, the acid of the several 
wines, it is not unexpected to find that the 
open foulage, No. .560, on the one hand, and 
the Morel process on the other, have given the 
highest figures; the one because of the constant 
access of air, the other from the same cause, in 
addition to the extraction of acid from the 
stems. 

The lowest figure for acid (.49) is given by 
Nos. 556 and 558, the hot fermentation with 
cover, and by the one with the three submerged 
frames. In the case of the latter this was to 
be looked for, and is precisely one of the chief 
advantages claimed for Ferret's method. In 
the case of the former it is somewhat unexpect- 
ed, and is the more instructive in contrast to 
No. .")57, the hot fermentation in which no 
cover was used, and in which the acid is one 
pro-millfe higher. Almost precisely the same 
difference occurs in the fermentations made at 
the lower temperature, one with the floating 
cover on (No. 561), and the other .(No. 560) 
without cover. The beneficial influence of the 
cover in preventing the formation of acid dur- 
ing fermentation is therefore placed beyond 
question. 

It should, however, be added, that in none 
of the fermentations made, there is at this time 
(Nov. 24) a notable amount of volatile (acetic) 
acid. This is true even of No. 564, the "old- 
style " one, in which the odor of vinegar was 
abundantly obvious before pressing. It shows 
the odor of vinegar plainly in boiling, but the 
amount is at present less than five thousandths 
of one per cent. 

It is somewhat remarkable that the fermen- 
tation No. 562, made at the lowest temperature, 
should yield a relatively high proportion of 



Jan. 15, 1887.] 



f AClFie I^URAb f RESS 



acid, exceeding that found in the fermentation 
made under the same conditions at a higher 
temperature. Whether this is to be accounted 
for by the longer duration of the low-tempera- 
ture fermentation, remains to be investigat- 
ed. 

Considering, next, the matter of tannin, we 
note at a glance the influence of the high tem- 
perature in aiding a complete extraction. The 
two hot fermentations, Nos. 556 and 557, have 
given the maximum of tannin, despite their 
short duration ; more even than in the case of 
the tank with diligent open foulage, and as 
much as the Morel process, stems and all, 
which was continued for 11 days; the effect in 
this case is so marked as to leave no doubt of 
the influence of this factor, and in it lies, prob- 
ably, at least a part of the explanation of the 
fact that the hot parts of our State have yield- 
ed more |tannin in their red wines than the 
cooler ones. 

The two tanks in which the frames were used 
(Nos. 558 and 559) present a curious problem. 
In both cases the same amount of tannin was 
taken up, although in the one the pomace was 
in a solid mass, and in the other was kept dif- 
fused all through. The result is disappointing 
as concerns the three-frame process, and shows 
clearly why, despite its apparent advantages, 
this method of treatment has not been widely 
adopted, even in France. It is evident that 
simply keeping the pomace in the liquid cannot 
replace the grinding and disintegrating action 
of the direct stirring or Joulage, so far as the 
extraction of tannin and color are concerned; 
for a glance at the color column shows that the 
deficiency of tannin is accompanied by a simi- 
lar relative deficiency of color, as compared 
with the tanks that were stirred. The same 
holds of the single-frame fermentation, where 
the color is even less; and the fact that an even 
amount of tannin was extracted, notwithstand- 
ing the pomace was in a solid mass at the top, 
is explained by the high temperature which, as 
the record shows, prevailed in that cap. The 
same consideration doubtless applies to the 
" old-style " (No. 562), in which the high tem- 
perature of the pomace cap offset the lack of 
stirring, and both tannin and color were fully 
extracted. 

A singular and unexplained fact is the defi- 
ciency of tannin in the tank with open foulage, 
without cover, for which no obvious cause can 
be assigned; the duplication of the determina- 
tion, however, leaves no doubt of the fact, which 
can hardly be explained without assuming that 
some of the tannin at first extracted was subse- 
quently destroyed by the action of the air. If 
this were so, the full complement of tannin in 
the " Morel " product might be explained by 
the presence of the astringent stems. 

The column giving the color-intensities is 
very instructive also. It will be seen that those 
yielding a low color were the two tanks with 
frames, already discussed, and the low-tempera- 
ture fermentation. No. 502, in which, despite 
diligent stirring, and the pretty full extraction 
of tannin, that of the color remained incom- 
plete, being nearly one-third less than the 
maximum. 

The full discussion of the bearings of these 
fermentation experiments is perhaps best de- 
ferred until the development of the wines, and 
their full analysis in their more advanced con- 
dition, shall give more data in regard to the 
final results of the several treatments. Those 
familiar with the subject of fermentation may, 
however, already derive important lessons from 
what is recorded above. Of course, these re 
suits must be verified by repetition the coming 
season, before they can be accepted as maxims; 
but there is much that cannot well be upset by 
any subsequent experiments. Among the 
points that may be considered well settled is 
that the method of fermentation adopted by 
this department (viz.: floating cover, with 
thrice daily stirring,) is amply justified by the 
outcome of the nine fermentations. It secures 
all the advantages of aeration, full extraction of 
tannin and color, and maximum of alcohol, 
without any risk of acetification if properly 
managed. The method has been carried out on 
the large scale by Mr. John Gallegos for two 
years past, and has yielded excellent results; 
the only difficulty encountered being that in 
the case of very soft skinned grapes, the fre- 
quent stirring reduced them to a pulp which it 
was difficult to press. In such cases the stir- 
ring must be moderated and made with imple- 
ments having the least crushing effect; but I 
am satisfied that in the hot vintage climate of 
California, the leaving - open of fermenting 
tanks to the access of air is most objectionable, 
is one of the most common and prominent 
causes of unsoundness, and should be done away 
with universally, adopting either the use of 
floating covers, or at least a cover over the top 
of th§ tank. Whether the disadvantages of 
the single-frame system can be overcome by a 
repeated pumping-over of the liquid from below 
over the pomace, is a question yet to be deter- 
mined; but that in the use of this method there 
is always a serious loss of color and tannin, can 
hardly be doubtful. 

Regarding the quality of the wines resulting 
from the several processes, but little can as yet 
be definitely said. However, the unanimous 
verdict of those who have thus far tasted them 
is to the eff'ect that the product fermented at 
62°, though light-colored, is the best, and that 
rushed through within 48 hours beyond com- 
parison the poorest, being flit and without 
character. Time alone, however, can definitely 
determiue the ultimate outcome. 



YounK or middle-aged men suffering from nervous de- 
bility, loss of memory, premature old age, as the result 
of bad habits, should send 10 cents in stamps for large 
illustrated treatise. Address, World's Dispensary 
Medical Association, 663 Main street, Buffalo, N. Y. 



"I would not live alway." No; not if disease is to 
make my life a daily burden. But it need not, good 
friend, and will not if you will be wise in time. How 
many of our loved ones are moldering in the dust who 
might have been spared for years. The slight cough was 
unheeded, the many symptoms of disease that lurked 
within were slighted and death came. I>r. Pierce's 
"Golden Medical Discovery" cannot recall the dead, 
though it has snatched numbers from the verge of the 
grave, and will cute consumption in its earlier stages. 



Don't Hawk, Spit, Cough, 
Suffer dizziness, indigestion, inflammation of the eyes* 
headache, lassitude, inability to perform mental work 
and indisposition for bodily labor, and annoy and dis- 
gust your friends and acquaintances with your nasal 
twang and offensive breath and constant efforts to clean 
your nose and throat, when Dr. Snge's "Catarrh Reme- 
dy" will promptly relieve you of discomfort and suffer- 
ing, and your friends of the disgusting and needless in- 
flictions of your loathsome disease? 



Percheron Horses.— Hundreds of stallions are 
now annually being imported from France to the 
United States. The immense wealth they are add- 
ing to the nation will be better understood from the 
estimate that the first cross of a Percheron stailion 
with a native mare doubles the selling value of the 
colt when mature. The truth of this assertion will 
be apparent from the authoritative statement that 
the Percheron-Norman Horse Co., of Colorado, 
recently received an offer from large operators in 
New York to contract to buy, at $125 per head, 
every colt they could raise during the next seven 
years. The accomplishment of these grand- results 
IS greatly due to the energy of one man, to whom 
the American people are greatly indebted, he having 
imported and distributed to almost every State and 
Territory nearly 2500 Percheron horses. A visit to 
Mr. M. W. Dunham's " Oaklawn Farm," at Wayne, 
Illinois, will give new ideas of the magnitude of the 
horse improvement of the country. 



Berkeley, Jan. 6, 1887. 



B. W. HlLGABD. 



Complimentary Samples. 

Personsreceiving this paper marked are re- 
quested to examine its contents, terms of sub- 
scription, and give it their own patronage, and, 
as far as practicable, aid in circulating the 
journal, and making its value more widely 
known to others, and extending its influence in 
the cause it faithfully serves. Subscription 
rate, |3 a year. Extra copies mailed for 10 
cents, if ordered soon enough. If already a 
subscriber, please show the paper to others. 

Read His Ad. 

Theodore Skillman, of Magnolia Stock Farm, Petaluma, 
whohasdjne so much to improve the breed and in- 
crease the size of our draft horses by selecting and bring- 
ing so many good ones to this Coast, has an advertise- 
ment in this issu*^, from which it will be seen that he has 
just landed anotiier importation, the pick of France, 
and, in his judgment, a few of the coal-blacks are su- 
perior to any heretofore imported. There is one thing 
we have noticed, which speaks in favor of Mr. Skillman's 
judgment, and that is that his horses always find ready 
sale. This lot will, as usual, be put down to living 
rates and sold on easy terms. He also has a few of the 
celebrated French Coach Horses, which ;.re becoming so 
popular in the East, and will soon be in as great demand 
here, when their merits are more fully made known. 



ba|]k3 apd bapkipg. 



Our Aerents. 

Our Friends can do much in aid of our paper and the 
cause of practical knowledge and science, by assisting 
Agents in their labors of canvassing, by lending their in- 
fluence and encouraging favors. We intend to send none 
but worthy men. 

Jared C. Hoag— California. 

G. W. INQALM — Arizona. 

E. L. Richards — San Diego Co. 

R. G. Huston— Montana. 

Geo. McDowell— Fresno andTulare Cos. 

O. F. Bergman — Napa and Sonoma Cos. 

M. S. Prime — San Joaquin and Alameda Cos. 

S. H. Hekrixq— Contra Costa Co. 



Consumption Cured. 

An old physician, retired from practice, having had 
placed in his hands by an East India missionary the 
formula of a simple vegetable remedy for the speedy 
and permanent cure of Consumption, Bronchitis, Ca- 
tarrh, Asthma, and all Throat and Lung Affections, also 
a positive and radical cure for Nervous Debility and all 
Nervous Complaints, after having tested its wonderful 
curative powers in thousands of cases, has felt it his 
duty to make it known to his suffering fellows. Actuated 
by this motive and a desire to relieve human suffering, I 
will send free of charge, to all who desire it, this recipe, 
in German, French, or English, with full directions for 
preparing and using. Sent by mail by addressing with 
samp, naming this paper, VV. A. Notes, 149 Powers' 
Block, Rochester, N. Y. 




PIANOFORTES. 

UNEQUALLED IN 

Tone Tonch Workmanship and Durability. 

WILLIAM KXABE <fe CO. 

Nos. 204 and 206 West Baltimore Street, Baltimore. 
No. 112 Fifth Avenue, New York. 



NATIONAL ASSURANCE CO.. 

OF IRELAND. 

ATLAS ASSURANCE OOMP'Y. 

OF LONDON. 

BOYLSTON INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF BOSTON, MASS. 

H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 
Qbnrkai, AaEMTS, 
809 & Sll Saoeome St., Sao Francisco. Oal. 



GRANGERS' BANK 

OF CALIFORNIA. 
SAN FRANCISCO, OAL. 

Authorized Capital, - - $1,000,000 

In 10,000 Shares of $100 each. 

Capital Paid up in Gold Coin, $645,360. 

Reserved Fund and Paid np Stock, $21,1 78. 
OFFICERS : 

A. D. LOGAN President 

I. C. STEELE Vice-President 

ALBERT MONTPELLIER Cashier and Manager 

FRANK Mcmullen Secret»ry 

DIRECTORS: 

A. D. LOGAN, President Colusa County 

H. J. LEWELLING Napa County 

J. H. GARDINER Rio Vista, Cal 

T. E. TYNAN Stanislaus County 

URIAH WOOD Santa Clara County 

J. C. MERYFIELD Solano County 

H. M. LARUE Yolo County 

I. C. STEELE San Mateo County 

THOMAS McCONNELL Sacramento County 

C. J. CRESSEY Merced County 

SENECA EWER Napa County 

CURRENT ACCOUNTS are opened and conducted in the 

usual way, bank books balanced up, and statements of 

accounts rendered every month, 
LOANS ON WHEAT and country produce a specialty. 
COLLECTIONS throughout the Country are made. 

promptly and proceeds remitted as directed. 
GOLD and SILVER deposits received. 
CERTIFICATES of DEPOSIT issued payable on demand 
BILLS OF EXCHANGE of the Atlantic States bought 

and sold. ALBERT MONTPELLIER, 

Cashier ana Manager. 

San Francisco, Jan. 15, 1882. 

THE GERMAN 

Savings and Loan Society, 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital and Deposits, Jan. 1, '87, 
$14,362,960. 

LOANS MADE ON REAL ESTATE IN 
THE COUNTRY 

AT LOWEST MARKET RATES. 



SANTA ROSA NATIONAL BANK, 

Cor. 4th & B Sts., Santa Rosa, Cal. 

Paid-up Capital, $100,000. 

OFFICERS : 

E. W. Davis, President. J. H. Brush, Vice-President. 
Lewis M. Alexandf.b, Cashier. 

Directors— B. M. Spencer, J. H. Brush, D. C. Bane, 
Lewis M. Alexander, D. N. Carithers, S. K. Cooper, E. W. 
Davis. 

Correspondents— National Park Bank, New York; First 
National Bank, Chicago; First National Bank, S. F. 
Collections promptly made. Exchange boutjht and sold 



MONEY TO LOAN 

ON 

COUNTRY REAL ESTATE 

AT REDUCED BATES BY THE 

SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
619 Clay St., San Francisco. 
i^Blank Forms of Application furnished. 



OYSTERS, Wagner's, 2-lb 14 cts 

CLAMS, 1-lb., 14c., 2-lb 22 cts 

CORN STARCH 6 cts 

JELLIES, Assorted, 2-lb 15 cts 

LARD, 51b. cans, 35c., 10-lb 60 cts 

MATCHES, 1200 4 cts 

CORNED BEEF, 2-lb 17 cts 

PICKLES, 5 gal. kegs 70 cts 

And all other goods equally Low 

AT 

AMERICAN MERCANTILE UNION, 

24 & 26 Ellis Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 
«■ Write for Price List."^ 



AGENTS W ANTED "^rSTit-^ 

MISSOURI 

STEAM WASHER 

To men and women of (jood 
character, seeking profitable 
employment, e.Kclusive ter- 
ritory will bo given with 
agency. Teams can be ua«i 
ti) advantage by agents in 
country districts. The Wash- 
er is made of metal, size 
13x22 inches at ba.se, and 
works on a now prliiciplo. which saves labor marvel- 
ously. Sample shipped on a week's trial on liberal 
terms. Its great merit enables agenis lo earn $,)0 
to $'.200 per month. Write lor ihustratcd circular 
and terms of agency, ui. WORTH, .Solo HIfr.« 
1710 FrankliaAve., ST. LOUIS. Mo. • 
Or P. 0. Box 1968, San Francisco, Cal. 




yiicatiopal. 



SPKCIAI. OFFER. 

I will .ship, in localitioa where, ns yet, I 
have NO AUKNT, 1 samiile "New Becker" 
Washer and "Empire" Wimger at wiiole- 
SAI,E prices. E. W. MELVIN, Prop'r. 
Office, 806 J St., SaoTfimento, Cal. 




California Military Academy, Oakland, Cal. 





Special Feature— Commercial Department. Next Term 
begins Monday, January 3, 1887. Send for circular. 

COL. W. H. O'BRIEN, Principal. 

BUSINESS 
COLLEGE, 

46 OTarrell St.,YoSr San Francisco. 

"OUR COLLEGE LEDGER," 

Containing full particulars regarding the College 
Departments, Courses of Study, Terms, etc. will 
be mailed fr<»e *o all applicants. 

THE OAKS, 

Tlxo H o m. o !S c Ix o o 1 , 

OAK ST , OAKLAND, CAL. 

Departments— English and Classical, Modern Lan- 
guages, Drawing and Painting, Music and Physical Cult- 
ure. Lessons, private and classes. i^'THE Next Term 
will begin on Wednesday, January 5, 1887. 

MISS L. TRACY, formerly of 629 Hobart St., recently 
of 1825 Telegraph avenue. 

SXOCKXO?f 

Telegraph Institute 

^Ud-tyft^dd and 

NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Open day and evening for ^-y^ ^ 
both sexes. Expenses less - 
than one half the usual S^'i^ 'Z^e^fp^^ 
rates. Excellent board in ^ 
private families from $8to $10 per month. Ad. 
■•roRs. for College Journal and Circulars, 
J. C. BaINBRIDOE, Principal. Stockton. Cal. 



BUSINESS 
eOLLEQE, 

24 Post St. s. r 

SHod for CSrcnJUMf 




J. L. HEALD'S 

AGRICULTURAL WORKS, 

Crockett, Contra Costa Co., Cal. 

Stationary Engines and Boilers. 

PortaMe Straw-finning Boilers & Engines. 

IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS. 

Machinery of all kinds furnished at shortest notice. 

Heald's Patent Wine-making Machinery, 

including Grape Crushers and Stemmers, Elevators, Wine 
Presses and Pumpa, and all appliances used in Wine 
Cellars. Irrigating and Drainage Pumps. Heald'g 
Patent Eneine Governor, Etc. 

laGWICKSMwiRrFENCEr 




The best Farm, Garden, Poultry Yard, Lawn, 
School Lot, Park and Cemetery Fences and Gates. 
Perfect Automatic Gate. Cheapest and Neatest 
Iron Fences. Iron and wire Summer Houses, Lawn 
Furniture, and other wire work. Best Wire Stretch- 
er and Plier. Ask dealers in hardware, or address, 

SEDGWICK BROS., RICHMOND. Ino. 



Reasons why Sherwood's Steel Harness is 
the Best and should and will be 
Universally Used: 

1. — It is a common sense Harness. 2. — It is made of ma- 
terial that will last a lifetime. 3. — In plowing, dragging, 
logging and scraping there are no whifHctrees. 4. —In all 
farm work you can chanvc from plow to wagon quick. 
-In plowing in the orchard, you can't bark fruit trees. 

6. — In plowing and cultivatin g hops it has no equal. 

7. — In plowing along the fences you can get two furrows 
cioscr. 8. — Horses cannot step o^ er the traces, or calk 
themselves. 9. — A small boy will handle plow readily, 
10 —There is no weight on plow oeam. 11.— Team works 
one-third easier. 12. — There is no chafing, crowding or 
fretting of team. 13 —For man and team it has no e(|ual. 
Do not hesitate, but order at once from your nearest 
agent. Address 

TRUMAN. ISHAM & HOOKER, 

San Francisco, Oal. 



RTTPTTJRE 




r,>-M,.irii< llc- lt. lt. 

.M.i c.riibliM il liu;il iintcc lithe 
<iiM- in th.- VV..1I11 ircnriMtiMg 
iniiil..l|.< KU;-U-ir .V,tll,llllo 
,.-i. nl ilic-. I'ljwvrnil. Duialile, 
icI IllKc tiM.. Avoid fnuida 
(I. Srrnt st.tinp loi-paniplWet. 
Al.si* KI,K< TI£I<' ItKl.T.H F«lt niNICAKKS. 

OR, HORNE, INVENT0B,702 MARKET ST.,$W FRANCISCO* 



52 



f ACIFie f^URAlo f RESS. 



[Jan. 15, 1887 



WEST COAST LAND CO, 



SAN LUIS OBISPO, CAL. 



Incorporated March 27, 1886. 



CAPITAL, 



$500,000. 



DIRECTORS. 
Gro. C P»RKIK8, 
John L. Howard, 
Isaac Goldtokk, 
R. E. Jack, 

C. H. PUILLIPS. 



OFFICERS. 
John L. Howakd, President. 
Isaac Golutrkk. Vii e Pres't. 
R. E. Jack, Treasurer. 
C. H. PHILLIPS, 

Secretary aud Manager. 



THE PASO R0BLE8, SANTA YSABEL, and 
EUREKA RANCHES, 

Recently purchased b; the West Coast Land Company, are now offered for sale in sub- 
divisions. 

This immense body of land, including 12,000 acres unsold of the Huer Hiiero ranch, 
belonging to C. H. Phillips, comprises 64,000 acres of rich, virgin soil. It lies in a compact 
body, in the center of San Luis Obispe county, and is within from 9 fo 20 miles of the sea 
coast. It is covered with white and live oal£ timber, is one of the most pictures^iuc bodies 
of land in the State, and requires 

NO IRRIGATION. 

It has an abundance of living water, and where not sufficient for domestic use, good 
water can be h^d at a depth of from 10 to 40 feet. It has an average annual rainfall of 21 
inches, exceeding by six inches tliat of Santa Clara county, one of the most prosperous 
counties in the State, 

The extension of the Southern Pacific Railway from Soledad 
southward traverses these lands for 15 miles throughout their 
entire length, placing the property within eight hours of San 
Francisco. 

These lamia are offered at from JIO to $30 an acre, and are all susceptible of the highest 
cultivation. In salubrity of climate, productiveness of soil and location as to market, they 
are equal to lands in Los Angeles and other counties, which readily bring from $100 to $200 
and Upward; and as to price and terms, offer the best inducements to those seeking homes 
on any port of the Pacific Coast. The survey of the 



PASO ROBLES RANCH 

Has been completed. The maps and catalogues arc now ready, and will be sent free on 
application. 

This ranch, containing 20,400 acres, has been subdivided into 230 lots. It is 13 miles 
from the sea coast, and is 20 miles north and west from San Luis Obispo city. 

This ranch was one of the earliest granted by the Mexican Government and having been 
held by the same party for over 30 years, has never before been offered for sale. It consists 
exclusively of land of the choicest character, and is second to none in the State (or the pro- 
duction of wheat, wine, fruits, raisins and olives. 

TITLE, U. S. PATENT. 

One-third cash; balance in 4 equal payments at 2, 3, 4 and 5 years; interest, 6 per cent 
per annum. The mortgage tax paiil by the mortgagee makes the interest about 4 per cent 
net to the purchasar. A deposit of $25 will be required in all cases to cover expenses of sale. 

C. H. PHILLIPS, Manager, 
West Coast Land Co., San Luis Obispo, Oal. 
^Send for Catalogue and Map. 




A MAGIC CURE 



Hheumatlsm, Neural- 
gia, Pneumonia, Pa- 
ralysis, Asthma, Sci- 
atica, Oout, Lumbago 
and Deaftaess. 

Everybody should have It 
G. G. BURNETT, Ag't. 

327 Montgomery St, S. F. 
Price, $1.00. Sold by all Drug 

gists. t^Call and see 
DR. CHA8. ROWELL. 

Opfici— 426 Kearny St, 
San Francisco. 



THIS NEW YEAR 

Finds us (as 40 or more new years past have found us) 
still in the field and at the front of the music publishing 
business. We offer some 

CHOICE MUSIC BOOKS, 

Among which are to be found the following, which 
teachers, amateurs, and others will do well to examine: 

Song Classics, 

By Rubinstein, Oounod, Lassen, Jensen, Orieg, and 
others. Price, $1. A splendid collection of classic vocal 
music. A large book, sheet music size, beautifully 
printed and bound, and containing about .W carefully 
selected gems, suitable for all kinds of voices. Many 
of the songs are favorites on the programs of the best 
concerts. The music is not difficult. 




I Want AGENTS to SELL g Ymg PeoplB's lllnsiTateil History of Music, 



To men or v. 
fitable employ 



WnNwiissouri 

STEAM 

Washer 



and nhility, seeking pro- 
territory will be giv 



with Agency. The WuBhwr in mafle of metal and works 
on a new principle which f^iiveM labor, clothes and Ronp. 
Sample sent on a week '8 trial to be returned 
at mvex^pense i^"^^ satisfactory, 

I \ year is being mnile 
tomi>etent, shifty 
HKents. liitrinnic 
merit mnkin^ it n rhenominal success everywhere. 
Bend for my ilhistrnted circular find termB of agency, 

I. WORTH .Sole Man'f'r. 1 7 lO Franklin ave., 
St. Louis, Mo. 

<:»r p. O. Box 11M>S, Fan Francisco. Cal, 



at mv expense it not satrsfa 

$600 to $2,000: 



tlEAFNESS 



Its causes, and a new and suc- 
ccpsful CUKK at your own 
hrnie, by one who was deaf 
U twentj ei^'ht years. Treated bv mo-t of the noted 
s[>ecialists without benefit. Cured himtiel/ in three 
months, and since then hundreds of others. Full par 
ticulars sent on application. 

T. 8. PAGE, No. 41 West 3l8t St., New York City. 



By J. C. .Macy. Price, SI. Containing short biogra- 
phies of famous musicians, and a condensed and 
iBleresting history of music from the earliest days 
to the present time. All persons, young or old, will en- 
joy the book. Portraits accomijany the sketches. 

Young People's Classics for the Piano. 

$1. Very popular collection of the best music in easy 
arrangements. 

Piano Classics 

Is a great favorite with good pianists. Price, $L 

The Royal Singer, 

Bv L. 0. F-nierson; CO cents. New Singing School and 
Choir Book, cyseiid for our Catalogue of Music Books. 

OLIVER DITSON & CO., Boston. 

C. H. DITSON & CO., . - 867 Broadway, New York. 



CONSUMPTION. 

I have a posltlTs remi-d j for the above disease ; by Its use 
tbonsands of ciuea of the worst kind and of long standing 
bare been cnred.IndMrtjio utrone In my fmth In Us efficacy 
if fLj S'i'o";".!!^*' BOTTLES PBEK, together irlth a V Ali 
UABLB TREATISE on thl8dl»e««e.to »nf .offerer. OlvetlT 
piesa « P. 0. aduiew. »«, y. a. 61.0CUM, lu rearl St. K. f 



FRES NO COU NTY. 

BRIGGS' SELMA TRACT. 



This most de.sirable tract, comprising 1280 acres of fir&t-cla-ss gray ash 
and sandy loam land (situated one and one-half miles frqm the fast-grow- 
ing town of Selma, the second in the county, and two miles from Fowler, 
both being S. P. R. R. towns), has been subdivided and will be sold in 20, 
40, 60 or 80-acre farms. The distributing ditche.s are now being constructed, 
and convenient roads are laid off. The main canal is 60 feet in the bottom. 

THE WATER RIGHTS 

Consist of stock in the canals and entitle the owner to o©e-eighth of 2 feet 
6 inches of water, to 20 acres, being 2h times the usual amount supplied to 
colonies. The owner of the water stock has a pro rata vote in the manage- 
ment of the canal, and the expense per year is S3. 7.5 on a 20-acre lot. 

A school-house is to be erected on the land this year, and it has two 
within two miles of it at present. Fresno, Selma, Fowler and Kingsburg 
are good local markets for produce. Opportunities to labor with or without 
teams are abundant, and land can be rented for wheat-growing in the neigh- 
borhood. The health of this region Ls perfection, and, in common with the 
plains generally, is an excellent sanitarium for persons afiected with pulmo- 
nary and rheumatic complaints. 

The best raisins in the world, wines unsurpa.ssed, the finest grapes, the 
best peaches, apricots, plums, prunes, nectajinas, figs and olives, and in fact 
all the choicest fruits and vegetabl&s of the ■wtirld are grown in this favored 
region. Raisin vines three to six yeare old yield per acre from four to seven 
tons, and increa.se to eleven. Wine grapes three to six years old yield from 
four to eleven tons per acre. Alfalfa is cut from four to six times a year, 
and yields from one to two tons per acre at each cutting. 

Two good cows and 100 hens furnish more than half the living for a 
family, and can be kept, with a team, on three acres of alfalfa, the growth 
of which is incredible in this favorable combination of soil and climate. 

A comfortable house for a small family can be built for S150. 

The low price, taking into consideration water and tran.sport facilities, 
should especially recommend this to seekers of homesteads. Nearly one-half 
already sold. 

Price, $22 to S-IO per acre, on very easy terms to actual settlers. 
^p"For further particulars call on or address 
O. J. WOODWARD, Fkesxo, Cal. L. SHARPE. Selma, Cal. 




PULVERIZING HARROW, CLOD 



Crusher and 
Leveler. 



Subjects the soli to the action of a Steel Crusher and Leveler, and to the Cuttlngc. 
Lifting, TurnlnK process of Double Oangs of Cast Steel Coulters— Immense cutting 
power. Crushing, Leveling and Pulverizing performed at the same time. Entire ab- 
sence of Spikes or Spring Teeth avoids pulling up rubbish. The only Harrow that 
cuts over the entire surface of the ground. 

We make a variety of sizes from 3 to 15 feet wide. 

The "ACME" is in practical use in nearly every .^^'ricultural County on the Pacific Coast, and has proved 
itself to be just the tool (or ' 

VINEYARDS, ORCHARDS AND GRAIN FIELDS. 

^Send for Pamphlet containing Thousands of Testimonials from 48 States and 
Territories- 

Manufactory and Principal Office, MILLINOTON, MORRIS CO, N J. 
N. B.— "TILLAGE IS MANURE," A.VD Othbr Essavb, sent free to parties who same tuis papir. 
For Sale on the Pacific Coast by 

G. B. Adams & Son, San Gabriel, Cal.; Arthur W. Bull, San Francisco, Cal.; 
Slaver & Walker, Portland, Or., and Walla Walla, W. T. 



THE "ACME" PULVERIZING HARROW 

Is the most Thorough Implement invented for the Cultivation of the soil. It will save 
its cost many times in a season. 

READ WHAT A PROMINENT COLUSA RANCHER SAYS OP IT: 

Colusa, April 4, 18S6. 
ARTHUR BULL, Esq. — Dear Sir: I have given the "Acme" Pulverizing Harrow a 
thorough trial and find it far saperior to any other Harrow I have ever used, not only for the 
Orchard and Vineyard, but in the Grain Field. It doea the work fully twice as quick, leaving 
the ground in much better tilth. Dead weeds or stubble are no drawbacks to it. It goes along 
without any stoppages, and clears itself. It ought to be used by all grain raii»>r8. 

J. R. TOTMAN. 

ARTHUR BULL, Sole Agent, 

No. 123 California Street, - . - . San Francisco, Cal. 



Jan. 15, 1887.] 



f ACIFie I^URAb f RESS. 



53 



James Lick. 

At Rest In the Pier of the Great Telescope. 

On Oct. 1, 1876, more than a decade ago, 
James Lick, the philanthropist, died in San 
Francisco, and was temporarily entombed in 
the Masonic cemetery. Since that time the 
various benefactions provided for in his will 
have been carried forward, and the greatest of 
them all, the Lick Observatory at Mt. Ham- 
ilton near San Jose, is very near completion. 
According to an arrangement made before Mr. 
Lick's death, Mt. Hamilton was selected as the 
permanent resting-place for his remains. This 
was not by his direction, and it mustjaot be 
thought that he had any vain idea of securing a 
lasting monument for himself in his establish- 
ment of the Observatory. It was thought fit- 
ting by his friends that his tomb should be the 
solid pier of masonry upon which will rest the 
magnificent telescope which he has given to the 
people of this State — the greatest telescope the 
world has thus far seen. Last week the remains 
of Mr. Lick were removed from San Francisco 
to Mt. Hamilton and are now safely inclosed 
as was planned 10 years ago. The final burial 
was conducted with simple ceremonies, as will 
be described. 

The remains were taken from San Francisco 
to San Jose by rail on Saturday, January 8th, 



of the University of California became the trustees 
of this .Astronomical Observatory. 

The Board of Trustees of the Lick estate: 

Richard S. Floyd, President. 

E. B. Mastick. 

Chas. M. Plum. 

Geokge Schonewald. 
The President of the Board of Regents of the 
University of California and Governor of the State 
of California. 

Washington Bartlett, 

(by J. W. Wiuans.) 
The President of the University of California and 
Director of the Observatory. 

Edward Singl'cton Holden. 
The President of the California Academy of Sci- 
ences and of the council thereof. 

George Davidson. 
The President of the Board of Trustees of the 
California Academy of Sciences. 

George E. Gray. 
The President of the Society of California Pio- 
neers. GUSTAVE REIS. 

A Director and ex-president of the Society of 
California Pioneers. Peter Dean. 

The Mayor of the City of San Jose. 

C. W. Breyfogle. 

The preparation of the above document was 
assigned to Professor George Davidson. It 
was approved and then engrossed in hand- 
some style with India ink on fine parchment. 
A notable feature of the document is the use of 
the words " handcraft" and " rede-craft," be- 
ing the old Euglish terms for technical educa- 
tion. The words are certainly moat appropri- 




JAMES LICK, PHILANTHROPIST. 



with an escort of gentlemen representing the 
various institutions which have been intrusted 
with the management of Mr. Lick's benefac- 
tions. San Jose was reached at 11 a. m., a pro- 
cession of citizens of San Jose followed the re- 
mains to the borders of the city, and thence to 
the mountain the body was accompanied by 
those who went from this city and by the 
Mayor of San Jose. The mountain-top was 
reached at about 5 o'clock p. m., and the party 
proceeded at once to the rotunda, where the 
casket was opened and the remains identified 
by Capt. Fraser and others. They then pro- 
ceeded to the library, where Prof. Davidson 
read the memorial document of identification as 
follows: 

This is the body of James Lick, who was born 
in Fredericksburg, Penn., August 25, 1796, and who 
died in San Francisco, Cal., October x, 1876. 

It has been identified by us and in our presence 
has been sealed up and deposited in this foundation 
pier of the great equatorial telescope this ninth day 
of January, 1887. 

In the year 1875 he executed a deed of trust of his 
entire estate, by which he provided for the comfort 
and culture of the citizens of California, for the ad- 
vancement of flagdcraft and Rede-craft among the 
youth of fcan Francisco and of the State; for the de- 
velopment of scientific research and the diffusion of 
knowledge among men, and for founding in the 
State of California an astronomical observatory to 
surpass all others existing in the world at this epoch. 

This Ojbservatory has been erected by the trustees 
of his estate, and has been named the Lick Astron- 
omical Department of the University of California, 
in memory of the founder. 

This refracting telescope is the largest which has 
ever been constructed, and the astronomers who 
have tested it declare that its performance surpasses 
that of all other telescopes. 

The two disks of glass for the objective were cast 
by Ch. Feil, of France, and were bronght to a true 
figure by Alvan Clark & Sons, of Massachusetts. 

Their diameter is 36 inches, and their focal length 
is 56 feet 2 inches. 

Upon the completion of this structure the Regents 



ate, although long since fallen into disuse and 
not being found in the latest dictionaries. 

After the signatures given above were af- 
fixed, the document of identification was in- 
closed between two finely tanned skins, 
backed by black silk and soldered in a leaden 
box 18 inches long and of the same width and 
one inch in thickness. It was placed upon the 
iron casket, after which the lining of the oaken 
casket was soldered up air-tight and the oak lid 
screwed down. The casket was then draped 
with an American flag, and it was left in charge 
of a watchman until the following morning. 

On Sunday morning at 11 o'clock the gentle- 
men who had escorted the body to Mt. Hamil- 
ton ascended the gang-plank leading to the 
foundation-stone, and, arranging themselves 
around the vault, now containing the casket, 
with uncovered heads, were addressed by the 
president of the Lick Trustees, Captain R. S. 
Floyd, in the following words: " Gentlemfn: 
We are here to place the remains of James Lick 
in their final resting-place beneath this stone 
foundation of the pier upon which will be 
mounted the great telescope that he has given 
to California and the world of science. 

" Mr. Lick left no positive instructions as to 
the disposition of his remains. The idea of 
making this place a tomb for his body did not 
enter the motive of his munificent bequest 
which has created this great work. The idea 
was suggested to him long after he made his 
trust deed, and it met with his approval. 

"The trustees have concluded, with the ap- 
probation of his son, John H. Lick, now in 
Pennsylvania, to place his remains in this pier, 
believing that the most powerful telescope so 
far made in the world will make his most appro- 
priate monument, and this commanding site 
overlooking his California home his most fitting 
resting-place." 

At the conclusion of the president's remarks, 
workmen placed strong iron bars upon the 



PACIFIC COAST WEATHER FOR THE WEEK. 

[Fonilahed for publication in this paper by Nelson Gorom, Sergeant Signal Service Corps, U. 8. A. 





Portland. 


Red Bluff. 


Sacramento. 


S. Francisco. 


Los Angeles. 


San Diego 


DATE. 


so 


Temi 


5' 
c. 


Weat 


s. 


*n 
B 
•a 


5' 


a 
tp 


Rain 


i 


S" 
o. 




w 


a 

s 


D 


1 Weal 


w 


a 
B 




a 


1 Rain 


1-3 

a 
B 


a 




Jan. 6-12. 








D- 






P* 


S- 

a 




■a 




a 




■p 


p. 


a 




■a 


a. 


a" 
a 




•a 


a. 


1 

a 






















































.22 


50 


Nw 


Cy. 


.00 


67 


Nw 


CI. 


.00 


57 


S 


CI. 


.00 


67 


N 


CI 


.00 


72 


w 


CI 


.00 


67 


Nw 


CI. 


Friday 


.03 


46 


Nw 


Cy. 


.00 


61 


N 


CI. 


.00 


59 


Nw 


CI. 


.00 


55 


E 


CI. 


.00 


62 


SE 


CI. 


.00 


61 


sw 


Fr. 




.00 


41 


N 


CI. 


.00 


53 


N 


CI. 


.00 


51 


Nw 


CI 


.00 


56 


NE 


CI 


.00 


60 


SW 


CI. 


.00 


60 


Nw 


CI. 


Sunday 


.00 


37 


S 


Cy 


.00 


52 


N 


CI. 


.00 


48 


Nw 


CI. 


.00 


55 


NE 


CI 


.00 


63 


E 


CI. 


.00 


60 


Nw 


CI. 




00 


43 


SE 


Cy. 


.00 


63 


N 


CI. 


.00 


49 


Nw 


CI. 


.00 


52 


NE 


CI. 


.00 


62 


S 


CI. 


.00 


67 


Nw 


CI. 




.00 


50 


S 


Cy. 


.00 


49 


S 


Cy. 


.00 


52 


SB 


CI, 


.00 


53 


SE 


CI. 


.00 


64 


Nw 


CI. 


.00 


57 


w 


CI. 


Wednesday.. . 


.30 


48 


s 


Cy. 




54 


SE 


Fr. 




57 


S 


CI. 




55 


W 


Fr. 


.00 


57 


SE 


Fr. 


.00 


57 


SE 


Fr. 


Total 


.53 
































00 








,00 









Explanation.— CI. for clear; Cy , cloudy; Fr , fair; Fy., foggy; — indicates too small to measure. Temperatuie 
Wind and weather at 12:00 M. (Pacific Standard time), with amount of rainfall in the preceding 24 hours. 



abutments of the vault, upon which was placed 
heavy iron sheeting. The vault was then built 
with brick and mortar to the level of the foun- 
dation-stone. 

A great btone weighing two and one-half tons 
was then swung, being already suspended for 
the purpose, and let slowly down upon the 
brickwork, beneath which was the casket. 
Three other stones of the same weight were 
then placed in position, when the four were 
bolted by suitable bolts, running down to the 
foundation five feet. On top of the stones will 
be set the first section of the iron pier of the 
great telescope. The iron pier itself will weigh 
about 2.5 tons and will be about 30 "feet high. 
The mounting of the telescope, the tube and 
everything connected with it, will weigh 10 tons 
more. 

As many of our readers have come to the 
State during the last 10 years, and have not, 
perhaps, seen a portrait of Mr. Lick, we give 
herewith an engraving from a photograph taken 
some little time before his death. 



How to Save Money. 

Wherever you live, you should write to Hallett & Co., 
Portland, Maine, and learn about work that j'ou can do 
while liv'iiifi at your own home at a profit of at hast 
from $5 to fe"25 and upward daily. Some have made over 
S.^jO in a day. All is new. Either sex. All ages. Hal- 
lett & Co. will start you. Capital not needed. All par- 
ticulars free. Send alon^ your address at once and all 
of the above will be proved to jou. Nothing? like it ever 
known to workingmen. 



It Should Always be Borne m Mind 

That lime is the only really impartial test of genuine 
merit, and that according to the universal law of 
"the survival of the fittest," few sewing machines 
have withstood this test. Therefore, the only safe 
thing to do is to buy what time has proven to be the 
fiitest" — the "Domestic" Sewing Machink. 



Cheap Money for Farmers. 

Farmers in this State will be glad to learn that 
they can borrow on mortgage any amount, from 
$5000 to $500,000, from S. D. Hovey, 330 Pine St., 
San Francisco, at 6 to 7 per cent and taxes. ** 



A Blessing. 

Nothing adds more to the security of life, of 
happiness, and of health, than a safe and re- 
liable family medicine. S. L. R. has won for 
itself the appellation of "the family blessing." 
If a child has the Colic, it is sure, safe and 
pleasant. If the father is exhausted, over- 
worked, debilitated, it will restore his failing 
strength. If the wife suffers from Dyspepsia, 
Low Spirits, Headache, it will give relief. If 
any member of the family has eaten anything 
hard to digest, a dose of the Regulator will 
soon establish good digestion. It gives refresh- 
ing sleep even in cases where narcotics have 
failed. It is a preventive, perfectly harmless, 
to begin with, no matter what the attack, it 
will afl'ord relief. No error to be feared in ad- 
ministering; no injury from exposure after 
taking; no change of diet required; no neglect 
of duties or loss of time. Simmons Liver 
Regulator is entirely vegetable and is the purest 
and best family medicine compounded. J. H. 
Zeilin & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., sole proprietors. 



HALL'S 

SARSAPARILLf 

Cui-es all Diseases origmating: frcni 
a disordered state of the BLOOD ci 
LIVER. Rheumatism, Neuralgia 
Boils, Blotches, Pimples, Scrofu'lrv. 
Tumors, Salt Rheum and Mercuna, 
Pains readily yield to its purifyii)^: 
properties. It leaves the Blood pure 
the Liver and Kidneys healthy am; 
the Complexion bright and ciaar. 
J. R. GATES & CO. PROPRiEiuRS, 

417 Sansome St. San Francisco 



OLIVE TREES FOR SALE. 

One and Two years old. Warranted all Clean and Free 
from Pests. C. W. CRANE, 

616 Eighteenth St., Oukiuud, Cal. 



NEW 



Sample BooV ,,r boaiitlful cards, U Games, 
12 tricks In miiKic, 4.!it .Mhiim vf rsps. All for 
a 2c. btump. STAA CABD CO., Btktton IS, Ohio, 



fl RAND S PECIAL EDITIONS 



PACIFIC RURAL PRESS 

IFoxT X087. 

With Extra Pages! 

Handsomely Illustrated ! 

Extra Large Circulation ! 

Special editions, devoted largely to 
the subjects named below, will be is- 
sued as nearly as practicable at the 
dates and in the order mentioned. 
Subjects will be presented with fitting 
illustrations and with special articles 
prepared by those best informed of 
the matters treated: 

Feb. 26—Live-Siock, Dairy andPoul- 
iry Edition, 

With engravings of diflerent breeds of stock, 
and sketches of recent California progress in all 
departments of the very important animal in- 
dustry. 

March 19 — Southern California 
Edition. 

An issue devoted to the progress and devel- 
opment of our southern couniits, with engrav- 
ings of scenery and buildings, maps and statis- 
tics of the wouderful growth in settlemtnt and 
industry. 

April 2— Haymakers' and Harvest- 
ers' Edition. 

In this issue there will be descriptions of the 
novel and interesting methods and appliances 
which are original here and characteristic of 
California enttrprise and inventive skill. 

May 7 — Settlers' and Tourists' 
Edition, 

With information concerning the various immi- 
gration societies, statistics of settlement and 
experience of new comers. The edition will be 
ornamented with engravings of California 
scenery and descriptions which will be grateful 
to the touritt and traveler. 

June 4— Educational Edition. 

This edition is intended to set forth interest- 
ing facts concerning the splendid educational 
system of California, including both public and 
private schools and colleges. Illustrated with 
engravings of leading institutions, etc. 

July 2— National Patriotic Edition, 

With articles of patriotic tone, illustrated with 
spirited engravings of national character and 
fit to awaken and promote loyalty to our grand 
national institutions. 

By the above, and other enterprising efforts 
on the part of the editors and publishers, we 
intend to make the PaciI'IC Rural Press still 
ni'jre attractive for 1887. 

DEWEY & CO., Publishers, 

No. 252 Market St., S. F. 

A NEW COLONY 

On tlie new extension of Southern Pacific Railroads, 
on the lands belonging to H. T. BITGLL, Ksq., near Los 
Alamos, Santa Barbara county, Cal. Parties desiring to 
visit tiie property now, oan go via San Luis Obispo and 
take tlio ears from thence t" Los Alamos, tlience by stage 
to tile Colony. aO.OOO acres of tbe best lands in Cali- 
fornia, subuividcd into '20, 40 and SO acru farnn; $'20 to 
$:)0 per acre. INTKRNATIONAL IMMIGRANT 
UNION, 401 California St., San Francisco. 

nCU/CY Xm Pn 'O scientific pkess patent 

LfCnCI fx UU. O AGKNCV istheoldest »iBt»b- 
lisbed and most BuccoBsful on the Pacific CouL Mo. SSt 
Market SU Kl«v»ter 12 Front St., a r. 



54 



f ACIFie I^URAb f RESS. 



[Jan. 15, 1887 



breeders' bireclory. 



Six lines or less in this Directory at 60c per line per month. 



POULTRY. 



O. J. ALBEB, Santa Clara, has the finest fowls this 
season has ever raised. Parties needing new biooci 
will du Well tu write liiiu before buying, frices to suit 
the times. 



H. J GODF'RBY, San Leandro, Cal., flrst-class P. 
Kocks and Wyandotte eggs, $i per setting; no circulars 



PABIiO POULTRY YARDS, San Diego, Cal. 

Large establlHhiiient. Send for catalogue. 



W. O. DAMON, Napa, Wyandottes, W. and B. Leg- 
horns, P. Kocks, L. Brahmas, Pekin Ducks. 



MRS. M. E. NBWHALiLi, San Jose. White and 
Brown Leghorns, Laugshans, Plymouth Rocks, Light 
Br&hmas, Pokiu Ducks and Bronze Turkeys. 



JAa. T. BROWN, IS Georgia St., Los Angeles, Cal. 
Breeder of Thoroughbred Poultry of the leading va- 
rieties. Send for circular and price list. 

CHOICE LAND AND WATER FOWLS for 

sale at all times of all the most popular and profitable 
varieties. Please inclose stamp for new circular and 
price list to K. G. Head, Napa, Cal. 



T. D. MORRIS, Sonoma, Cal. Tuolouse and Embden 
Geese, Bronze and W. Holland Turkeys, and all leading 
varieties of Thoroughbred Poultry. 

D. H. EVERETT, 1816 Larkin St.,S. F., importer and 
breeder of Thoroughbred Laugshans and Wyandottes. 



AXFORD'S IMPROVED INCUBATOR.- 

4u0 e;;gs, $50; ISO eggs, $25. Guarantee satisfaction. 
For particulars address, I. P. Clark, Mayfleld, Cal. 

J. N. LUND, Box lia, Oakland, Cal. Wyandottes, 
Langshans, L. Brahmas, P. Kocks, B. Leghorns, B. B. 
K. Game Bantams, T. Guineas, Uom'g Antwerp Pigeons. 

D. D. BRIQGS, Los Gatos, Cal. Fancy Poultry breeder 



E. C. CLAP P, South Pasadena, Cal. Light Brahmas 
and Plymouth Rocks. No fowls for sale. Eggs from 
hrdt-class stock, after Nov. Ist. 



CALIFORNIA POULTRY FARM, Stockton, 
Cal. Send 2-cent stamp for Illustrated Catalogue. 



HORSES AND CATTLE. 



GEO. BEMBNT & SON, Redwood City. Ayrshire 
Cattle, Southdown SUeep, Essex Swine. 

R. J. MERKBLEY. Sacramento, breeder of Norman, 
Percheron Horses and thoroughbred Shorthorn Cattle. 



Estate of M. E. BRADLEY, San Jose, Cal., breeder 
of recorded thoroughbred Shorthorn Cattle and Berk- 
shire Hogs. A choice lot uf young stock for sale. 

M. D HOPKINS, Petaluma, Cal. Eastern Imported 
registered Shorthorn Balls and Heifers for sale. 



HOLSTEINS, AA3GIE, JACOB; NETHER- 
LAND and Artis strains; all ages; largest her 1 to 
select from. Young bulls, low. (All registered.) F. H. 
burke, 401 Montgomery Sc., S. F. 



B. J. TURNER, HoUister, Breeder of Percheron-Nor- 
man registered Horses and iioadsters. 



E W. STEELE, San Luis Obispo, Cal., breeder of 

Thoroughbred Holstein and Jersey Cattle. 



BETH COOK, Danville, "Cook Farm," Contra Oosto 
Co. , breeder of Aberdeen Angus, Galloways and De- 
vons (Registered). Young stock for sa le. 

PETER iSAXB & SON, Lick House, San Francisco, 
Cal Importers and Breeders, for past 16 years, of 
every variety of Cattle, Horses, Sheep and Hogs. 



WILLIAM NILES, Los Angeles, Cal. Thorough- 
bred Poultry, Cattle and Hogs. Write lor ciroular. 

J. R. ROSE, Lakeville, Sonoma Co., Cal. , breeder of 
Thoroughbred Devons, Roadsters and Draft Horses. 

THE BEST HERD OP" JERSEYS, all A. J. C. 
C. registered, is owned by Henry Pierce, San Francisco. 



P. H. MURPHY, Brighton, Perkins P. O., breeder of 
Shorthorn Durhams, and Poland-China Hogs. 

ONTARE RANCH, three miles west of Santa Bar- 
bara, Santa Barbara county, Culifornia. Coach Horses, 
Dratc Horses, Trotting Bred Horses and pure Holstein- 
Friesitn Cattle. Young cattle and matched teams 
always on hand. Francis T. Underhill, Proprietor. 
C. F. swan, Manager. 



COTATE RANCH BREEDING FARM, Pages 
Station, S. F. M. P. tt. K. P. O., Peun's Grove, 
Sonoma Co., Cal. Wilfred Page, Maua^'er. Breeders 
of Short Horn Cattle, English Draft Horses, Spanish 
Meriiio Sheep and Berkshire Swine. 



P. S. CHILES, DavisviUe, Yolo Co., importer and 
breeder of registered Shorthorns of the t>est families. 



STINSON iSt MARSH, Dayton, Nevada. Regis- 
tered Shorthorns of choice breeding strains. 



T. P. A. WILLIAMS. Columbia, Boone Co., Mo., 
breeder and importer ol Thoroughbred Herefords. 



LEONARD BKOS., Mt. Leonard, Mo., importers 
and breeders of Galloway, Abcrdaen-Angus and Short- 
horn cattle. 

HYDE MOORE, Visalia, importers and breeders 
of Shorthorn cattle. Young stock for sale. 



J. A. BREWER, Centerville, Alameda County, Cal. 
Shorthorns and Grades. Young stock for sale. 



SHEEP AND GOATS. 



L. U. SHIP PEE, Stockton, Cal., importer and breeder 
of Spanish Merino Sheep, Durham Cattle, Jacks and 
Jennys H Berkshire Swine; hign graded rams for sale. 



R. H. CRANE, Petaluma, Cal., breeder and importer. 
South Down of Long John Wentworth herd for sale. 



B. W. WOOLSBY & SON, Fulton, Sonoma Co., 
imp'rs iSi b'ders Thoroughbred Merino, & Jersey Cattle. 



BASTON MILLS, Lakeville, Sonoma Co., thorough- 
bred Spanish Uermo Sheep. Choice rams for sale 



KIRKPATRIGK & WHITTAKER, Knight's 
Ferry, Cal. , breeders of Merino Sheep. Bams for sale. 



J. B. HOYT, Bird's Landing, Ca!., importer and 
breeder of Shropshire Sheep; also breeds cross-bred 
Merino and Shropshire Sheep, llams for sale. 



T. H. HARLAN, Williams, Colusa Co., breeder pure 
blooded Angora goats, & Merinos; young stock for sale. 

SWINE. 



TYLER BBACH, San Jose. Oal., breeder of 

thoroughbred Berkshire and Essex Hogs. 



REGISTBKED BBRKSHIRES, BLACK 
JACK, BESS and REDWOOD; imported 
strains; pairs and trios, not akin, at farmers' prices. 
Young boars, low. F. H. Burke, 401 Montgomery St. S.F. 



WILLIAM NILES, LosAngeles,Cal. Thoroughbred 
Poland-China and Berkshire Pttrs. Clrcnlarsfree 



JOHN RIDER, Saoramento, Cal. Breeder of Thor- 
oughbred Berkshire Swine. My stock of Hogs ate all 
reoorded in the American Berkshire Reoord. 

W. D. RUCKER. Santa Clara, breeder of registered 
improved Poland-China Swine. Pigs for sale. 



L L. DICKINSON. Lone Oak Farm, Sonora, Tuol- 
umne Co., Cal. , breeder of thoroughbred Essex Hogs. 
Pigs now ready for sale. Prices reasonable. 




NEW IMPORTATION 

OK 

NORMAN STALLIONS. 

Theodore Skil'inaii ha^ just arrived from France with 
the choicest importation of Norman Stalliona that has 
ever reached the Pa ific Co ist. Mr. Skillman has selected 
tliese horses from the best in France, with a view to the 
improvement of draft horses on thi-a Coast. Ihey are 
younif and sure to suit the tastes of intendlntf purchaser^ 
as reifards color, etc > a number bemif coal black. He 
has also on hand some Imported I'rench Coach Stallions. 
These horses are now very popular iu the Kast and have 
lonir been the favorite carriasre horses *if France. Their 
merits speak for themselves. Come and inspect this 
rare collection of horses and be convinced that they are 
the best ever seen on this Coast. 



FRENCH DRAFT STALLIONS, 

Kentucky Jacks and Jennets, 
Work Horses and Mules 

FOR SALE. 

Some of the Stallions were imported from Europe, 
others from Illinois, and some young ones were bred in 
Califurn'a from imijorted stuck. The prices will be less 
than animals of equal value can be purchased else- 
where. 

Call at or address Patterson's Rani:h, Hueneme, Ven- 
tura County, or Patterson's Ranch, Graysuii, Stanislaus 
County, or for further information call on or address 
JAMES M. PATTERSON, No. 8 Davis St., San Francisco. 

JOHN D. PATTERSON. 



FOR SALE. 
HOLSTEIN-FRIESIAN CATTLE 

KROM TUB IISHD OF 

HON. LELAND STANFORD, 
On his Ranch at Vina, Tehama County, Cal. 
For prices and catalogue address 

MR. ARIEL LATHROP, 
Room 69, C. P. R. R. Building, 

Cor. 4th and Townsend Sts. , 

San Franclwo, Oal. 



RED POLLED CATTLE. 

For Milk, Butter and Beef; of a beautiful red color; no 
bonis for mischief; just the Cattle for the Farm, the 
Dairy and the Family. 

Imported, bred and for sale by 

L. F. ROSS, 
Send for Catalogue. Iowa City. Iowa. 



BADEN FARM HERD 
Of Short Horn Cattle and Dairy Cows. 

Catalogues and Prices on application to 

ROBERT ASHBURNBR, 
Baden Station, - San Mateo Co., Oal. 



The New Cast AJAX TINNERS' SHEARS. 



^Extremely I..0W 



Cutting edjfes, 
2 iiH'hes; eOj^ew 
chilled anH hard 
as steel, equal to 
the best t- 1 e e 1 
j;oods in cutting,' 
Price, 50 cts. each. Sl^ JM ijualities. 

Postage, 16 cts. qSBORn .& ALEXANDER, 

Mectaauics' Tools, Hardware and Macliiueryr, 
028 Ularket St., San Jfraucisco. 




YBRBA BUBNA JERSEYS. 

REGISTERED IN THE AMERICAN JERSEY CATTLE CLUB OF NEW YORK. 

O 



C/5 




B m 

31 

o ~ 

9 CO 



WINNINGS AT THE FAIRS 

At State Fair, Sacramento, 



1886: 



Eleven First Prizes in Classes for Age. 
One Second Prize in Classes for Age. 



IIKRl) PRIZES. 

Best herd of thoroughbred Jersey Cattle over 2 years old. 
Best herd of thoroughbred Jersey Cattle under 2 years 
old. 



Best herd.of thoroughbred Guernsey Cattle of any age. 

BWEEPSTAKBS. 

Best bull, and three of his calvps of any age or breed— 

.lerscy bull "Jack Lowe" (7518). 
Also, the Uuld Uledai awarded by the State for most 
meriturious exiiibit of horned animals. 
At Golden Gate Fair, Oakland. 
One Second Prize in Classes for age. I Seven First Prizes In Classes for age. 

Herd Prize, comjwting against Ayrshires and Devons Also, Herd prize, competing against Ayrshires and 
over 2 years old. | bevons under 2 > ears old. 

RECORDS OP FOUNDATION STOCK. 
MARY ANNE OF ST. LAMBERT, 36 lbs. 12J ozs. 1 



week. A. J, C. C. test, S07 Its. 143 o^B. H months. 
IDA OF ST. LAMBERT, 30 lbs. 2i ozs. 1 week, A. J. C. 
C. test. 



JERSEY BELLE OF SClTUATE, 25 lbs 44 ozs. 1 week. 

Her likeness above. 
El'ROTAS, 778 lbs. in 11 months. 
MON I'L.MSIR, 18} II,s. in 1 week. 
PRINCESS 2d, 40 It.s. 12J ozs. in 7 days. 



Blood Relatives of the above Oows, Young Animals of Both Sexes, for Sale. 
HENRY PIERCE, San Francisco. 

"holstbin-pribsians. 

STOPl THINK I INVESTIGATE 

The only Cow that has given 26,021 lbs. 2 ozs. of milk in a year. 
The only four-year old that has given over 23,000 lbs. in a year. 
The only two-year-old that has given 18,484 lbs. 18 oz*. in a year. 
The only herd of mature cows that has averaged 17,166 lbs. 1 oz. in a year. 
The only herd of two-ypar-olds that has averaged 12,409 11*8. 8 ozs. in a year. 
The only two-year-old that has made 16 It>s. 9 ozs. of butter in a week. 
The only herd in which 37 two-year-olds have average<l over 11 lbs. each in a week. 
Twenty-three cows in this herd have averaged 18 ttis. 3 ozs. of butter iu a week. 
Also a tine stud of Clydesdale Stallions, Mares and Allies of all ages. 
Send for Catalogue giving full records and pedigrees. In writing alwajs mention Ri'ral Prrss. 

SMITHS. POWELL St LAMB. Syracuse, New York. 




HOLSTEIN i JERSEY CATTLE 

Heifers in Calf in such grand bulls as Nether- 
land Star, Clilden Prince (Holstein) and A8han- 

tee's Saltan (Jersey) for sale at reasonable prices. 

Also POLAND-CHINA and BERKSHIRE PIGS. 
POULTEY-All Varieties. 



WalTR TO 



WILLIAM NILES, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



} ALHAMBRA POULTRY YARDS 



MARTIN EZ, 
CAE.. 



J JASFEK J. JONES 
i. Proprietor. 




— BRKBDKR OF — 

mOH-CLASS POULTRY. 

('lean sweep on Plymouth Rock Chicks at 
Creat California Poultry Show at San Francisco, 
Jan. 11th to 16th, 1886. The Bestis the Cheap- 
est. Illustrated Catalogue sentfreeon applica- 
tion; worth 91 to any breeder of poultry. 
Send me your name on a Postal Canl; 6000 
copies of fine Illustrated Catalogue tor free 
dintribution. 



GOLDEN GATE INCUBATOR. 

** Meelnir t% bellevinir*" Parties who contemplate usinn incubators, or who have been unsucessful in their use 
or iu the rearing' uf chickt-us. shuuld inspect our inruttator and broodiiig-houac. This is the only satisfactory showing iu 
thid period of distrust of iucubators— a distrust bruu(,'ht about, fur the most part, t>y ctieap and inefticitiut (.ontrivauces fur 
the purpose. We huve a Ioui^ aud strong list of recuiuiU''ndations, with the written tfstiiiiuny of people who have made 
th(.' largest aver^ne nerct-iitak'ffl you evi-r heard of; we iiavi* a large nutuber of uji^dals, dinlouiai and what-not from various 
Fairs; we have tlie flnerft lookiuK luachine you ever saw, with a ni:ii<niftci.'nt record of more 'han four yuars" duration— but 
we are quite wilMng you should discard alt these wrii^hty evident^i^s after ouce seeing the daily hatching of our machine and 
the hundreds of buuutiful, strong and healthy liirds, without vermin or blemish, now in our bruodiug-house. We Khow 
what w« can do, and you are cordially invited to know what tliat Ik. It is worth your while to vilnesi the re- 
sults of our more than six years' sufct-ssful expfriciit-r. |i<j;tts from San Francisco every half hour; fare, 15 cents. Large 
circuUra niaiU-J free. Ci. O. I^'CrKATOK CO., E»Nt OuUland, Cal. 



JONESA POLAND CHINA FARM. 




BLIAS GALLUP. Hanford Tulare. Co., Oal. 

Breeder of pure-bred Poland China Pigs of the Black 
Beauty, Black Bess, Bismarck, and other noted families. 
Imported hoars King of Bonny View and Gold Bust at head 
of the herd. Stock recorded in A. P. C. E. Pigs sold at 
raasonable rates. Oorreepondenoe solicited. Address as above 




GRIND 



voru ou^ 

ItoiuN .>f(-al, 

... IIvmUtSIicII?*, 

(■ruhain Flour & Corn, iuthe 

HANDiyilLL'&r 

I on per cent, more made 
In keeping Pou I Ir j . Also yO\\ ER yi 1 I.I .S and 
f.-AltSl kKEII >III,I.S. C^rcularsandtestimoniala 
wnt on application. WILSON BKOS. Kaston. Pa. 



Are you using Wellingr- 
tou'g Improved Egg Food 
for Poultry ? Ir not, wut 
NOT? Every Orocer, Druggist 
and Merchant Sella this Egg 
Food. 





HENLEY'S 

IMPROVED 
MONARCH 

FENCE 
MACHINE. 



Patented Jul. \ Jl, i- .M.i> 18, 1886. August 3,1886. 
The only jiractical muuiiine in use that makes the fence 
in the held wherever wanted; makes the be^t, stron^^st. 
and most durable fence tor ^'eneral use and farm and 
Ktock imrpOF<es; weaves any Hize picket and any size wire. 
The fence will turn all slock without injury to same. 
For catalofe'ue and full particulars, address 

H. C. HENLEV, ffole Manufacturer. 

Factory, 523 to 533 North 16th St., Richmond, Ind. 



IXji .n.%4'ilINt:KV. Our Ar- 
tfMlan YVfll Fur^'cloprdia con- 
turns near jLHJj cugnivings, illu^trating 
aud describing all the practical tools 
and appliances used in the art of well 
eiukiug; diamond prospecting ma- 
chinery, windmills, ar- 
tesian engines, i^umpB, 
etc. Edited ny the 
"American Well 
Work.'',"' the largest 
manufacturers io the 
world of this class of 
machineo'- We will 
send this book to any 
party on receijit of 2S cents fur mailing. Expert well drill- 
ers and agents wanted. Address. Th* Auierlc«a 
Well Worlu, Aurora, Ul»^ V. tt. A, 




Jan. 15, 1887.] 



f ACIFie F^URAb f RESS. 



55 



iNCVlBi^TOf^S. 



THE 



PACIFIC INCUBATOR! 

Awarded the Gold Medal 
at the State Fair, Sacra- 
meMto, and at the Mechan- 
ics' Institute Fair of 1884 
1885 and 1886,overan com- 
petitors as the best machine 
made. It will hatch any kind of 
Eggs better than a Hen. 

Pacific Coast Agency for the 
celebrated Silver Finish Galvan- 
ized Wire Netting, The Wilson 
Bone and Shell Mill, and the 
American Meat Chopper. Poul- 
try appliances of every kind and 

-j nii|!iii|uw . every variety of Land and Water 

I ii'iqj gy'^ "^""-^ Fowl can be found at the Oak- 
I TS(/Q : land Poultry Yards, the oldest 

'^-^fSlAM- ■- and largest establishment on the 

Pacific Coast. The Par iflc Coast Poulterers' Hand Book 
and Guide; price, 40 cents. Sead 2-cent stamp for illus- 
trated 60-page catalogue to the PACIFIC INOIJ- 
BATOR CO., 1317 Castro t>t., Oakland, Cal 





PEERLESS 
INCUBATOR 



THERE IS MONEY IN CHICKENS! 

The "Peerless" has the only Regnilator 
that Regulates the flame of the lamp. 
That it has no equal, seeing is believing. 

From five to fifteen minutes in 24 hours is all that 
necessary to devote to the machine. 

The " Peorleas " has the best heater, the best self egg- 
moistener, and best pure air supplier of any machine 
manufactured. Its great and crowning feature is its 
automatic lamp or heat regulator. Its simplicity is 
taking. Acknowledged to have no competitor. 

i^Seiid for circulars, etc. 

BIVEN & CO, 

Factory— Corner California and Lindsay 
Streets, Stockton. Cal. 



THE 



Perpetual Incubator and Brooder, 




THE GIANT POWDER COMPANY. 



The most successful "business" Incubator ever in- 
vented. 

The only Incubator in which eggs can be introduced 
daily and hatch successfully. 

Requires no heat " regulator. " The heat is scientific- 
allv graduated to suit the different periods of incuba- 
tion. 

Three sizes made, viz.: 1, 2 and 3 dozen eggs per day. 
Send for circular to 

JOHN WORSWICK, 
Grangeville, Tulare Co., Cal. 

HATCH CHICKENS 

WITH THE 

PETALUMA INCUBATOR 

THE MOST SUCCESSFUL 
MACHINE MADE. 

Three Gold Medals, One Silver Med- 
al and Fifteen First Premiums. 

' Pric J ?;20 Hatches all kinds of Eggs 
tfS'Send for larg Illustrated Circular and -ae how you 
may get AN INCUBATOR FREE. Addiess 
Petaluma Incubator Co., Petaluma, Cal, 



The HaUted 
Incubator Co. 

1312 Myrtle St., 
Oakland, - - Cal. 

Price from $20 
up. Model Brooder 
l|| from $5 up. 

Thoroughbred 
Poultry and Eggs. 
Send for new Cir- 
culars containing 
much valuable in- 
formation. 





REUHBLE, 

AND aiMPLE. 



HILLSIDE POULTRY FARM. 

MRS. J. RATNOR, 

Breeder of 

My strain of Langshans are noted for their purity, 
large size and fine layers. Early Chicks for sale. Eggs, 
33 for 13. 

Frultvale, Bast Oakland, Cal. 



ETERINARY 



S 



URGEON, 



PATENT OWNERS OP 

NOBEL'S DYNAMITE, 

NOBEL'S EXPLOSIVE GELATINE, 

NOBEL'S GELATINE-DYNAMITE, 

Best and Strongest Exnlosiyes in tlie World. 



Late Veterinary Inspector of Cattle for the State 
of Kentucky. 

Operative Surgery and Treatment of 
Chronic Lameness Specialties, 



JUDSON POWDER, 

The Only Reliable and Efficient Powde 

For Stump and Bink Blasting. From 5 to 20 
pounds blows any Stump, Tree or Root clear 
out of ground at less cost than grubbing. 
Riilroaders and Farmers use no other. 

As other makers IMITATE our Giant Powder, so ao they Judson, by Manufacturing 
a second-grade, inferior to Judson, 
BANDMANN, NIELSEN & CO, General Agents, San Francisco. 



GRANGERS' BUSINESS ASSOCIATION, 

SHIPPING § COMMISSION HOUSE, 



OFFICE, 108 DAVIS STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Warehouse and Wharf at Port Oosta. 



DR. S. B. SWIFT. 



San Joae. Oal. 



PAINLESS PARTURITION POSSIBLE. 

60,000 Sold. Tokology, hy Alice B. Stockham, 
M. D. , is a NOHLE BOOK for a noblo purpose. Sample 
pages FKEB. Cloth, $2.00; mor. , $2. 76. 

SANITARY PUBUSHING CO., Chicago. 



CONSIGNMENTS OF GRAIN, WOOL, AND ALL KINDS OF PRODUCE SOLICITED. 

Money advanced on Grain In Store at lowest possible rates of Interest. 
Full Cargoes of Wheat furnished Shippers at short notice. 

ALSO ORDERS FOR GRAIN BAGS, Agricultural Implements, Wagons, Groceries 
and Merchandise of every description solicited. 

B. VAN EVERY, Manager. A. M. BELT, Assistant Manager. 




GOULD'S 

SPRAY PUMP. 



This Pump we have gotten up expressly for spraying 
vines, fruit trees, etc., infested with destructive insects. 
It has been adopted and recommended bv the State Horti- 
cultural Society. The working parts are constructed en- 
tirely of Brass, and will not Ija affected by the corrosive 
iolutionf used. The BAMBOO KXTENSION is an ad- 
mirable invention. Th"^ operator, by the use of this ex- 
tension, can get to all parts of the tree while on the 
;round; also saving himself from getting burnt with the 
lolution. Tlie improved nozzle will save the price of itself 
witliin a day. It throws a very fine mist. We have also 
m attachment for Pump to stir up tlie litiuid in barrel be- 
fore putting on the solution, thus keeping the liquid always 
m condition to be laid on evenly, and not allowing the 
nrepaiation to settle at the bottom. Send for special Cata- 
logue. 

We are prepared to fit these Pumps complete with Hose, 
Bamboo Kxtensions, Barrel, all ready to commence spray- 
mg with. Write for prices. 

WOODIN & LITTLE, 
509 & 511 Market St., San Francisco, 




S. W. Corner Kearny and Montgomery Avenue, San Francisco. 

rFTofi Ooacb to and from thn Honsw. J. W. BECKER. Proprietor. 



SHeEP i^ND SHEEpWi^sH. 



UTILE'S 




SHEEP DIP. 

Price Reduced to 
$1.25 

PER OAI.I,OM. 



Twenty gallons of fluid 
mixed with cold water will 
make 1,200 gallons of Dip. 
It Is superior to all Dips and Dressings for Scab in 
Sheep; is certain In effect; is easily mixed, and Is applied 
in a cold state. Unlike sulphur or tobacco, or other 
poisonous Dips, It Increases the growth of the wool, stim- 
lates the fleece, and greatly adds to the yolk. It destroys 
all vermin. It is efBcaoious for almost every disease (In- 
teroal and external) sheep are subject to. 

FALKNER, BELL & OC 

San Francisco. Oal. 



Recommended by Professors Hilgard, Cooke, etc. 

Powdered Potash & Caustic Soda 

KIL.I.S_ GOPHERS, INSECTS, Etc. 

Makes a pure Soap at a cost of 81 per 126 K>s. Send for 
directions to T. W. JACKSON & CO., 

804 Oallfornla St, S. 




Calvert's Carbolic 

SHEEP WASH 

per Gallon. 

After dipping the Sheep, Is use- 
ful for preserviuK wet hides, de- 
stroying the vine pest, and for 
wheat dressings and disinfecting 
purposes, etc. T. W. JACKSON, 
S. F., Sole Agent for Pacific Coast 



WEA.<, NERVOUS PEOPLE 




thers sunerintr from 
I <lrbility f.\h;iustinK 
(Ji?-i.-iiM-^, pivrnjituro 
of yoMii^' or old are 
■ly cuiL'd by Dr. 
faiiKiim KUic'troa 



in evevy -rA -Strite \n the UJiion have been cured. 
Kleotriel -^Vfc^tv instuntly IVIt. Paieniedand sold 10 
years Whule lainily e;in wv.xr same belt. KU-etrlc 



yeitrs VVhuIe lainily ean we:ir same belt. KU-etrlc 
HiiHpeii8orleKfr.-e williinale In-lts Avoid worthless iin- 
itntions uiKl b.-i^'us ■■..inpan i« s Kleeti-le TriiMneK for 
Kliptiiro. TOO enred Ill's.-,. .Send slanir> l oi j.aTnpIdet. 

OR. HORNE, INVENTOR, 702 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 



I CURE 



"When I say euro 1 do imc moan tiuirely to stop lliym for a 
tlmoand then Imvo them return ftcalii I mean u radical euro. 
I have made tho disease ef I'UTy, EPII.Ei'SY or FALLINU 
SICKNESS a lile-Ionp fltudv. Iwarruiit my remedy to euro 
the worst cases. Becanso others have falloU Is no reason for 
not now roci'lvlng^ a cure. 8end at oure for a treatise and a 
Free Uortlo of ray infallible remedy. Give Express and I'obt 
Odico IC coRtavou not*-;iii? for a trlHl. and I will cure you. 
^ Addreea D». U. 0. KOOT, 183 mil St., New York. 



zmmim liiiefcliaptg, 

WM. T. COLEMAN & CO., 

Shipping and Commission 

MERCHANTS, 
San Francisco and New Tork. 



Receive consignments of Produce for sale In San Fran- 
cisco, New York, Boston, Philadelphia, England, Aus- 
tralia, etc. Malte advances on approved conaigrunents. 
Fill orders for staple goods in New York and other mar- 
kets. Effect fire and marine insurance in best offices. 
Charter vessels and engage freights for all trades. Agents 
for line clipper ships from Philadelphia, China, etc All 
business has faithful and watchful attention. 



H. Et M O V ^ ILi. 

daltoiTbros.. 

Commission Mercltants 

AND DKALKR8 IH 

QALIFORNIA AND OREGON PRODUCE, 

ORBBN AND DRIED FRUITS, 

drain, Wool, Hides, Beans, and Potatoes. 

808 and 810 DAVIS ST., 
P. 0. Box 1936. SAN FRANCISCO 

CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. 

MOORE, FERGUSON & CO., 

WOOL, GRAIN, FLOUR 

—AND— 

General Commission IVIerchants, 

310 California St., S. F. 

Members of the San Francisco Produce Exchange. 

ayPersonal attention given to Sales and Liberal Ad- 
vances made on Consignments at low rates of interest. 



Ubo. Morrow. lEstabllsbed 1854.] Oeo. F. Mobkow. 

GEORGE MORROW & CO., 

HAY and GRAIN 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

30 Ulay Street and 28 Commercial Street, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
tr SHIPPING ORDERS A SPECIALTY. •» 

O. L. BENTON & CO., 

Commission Merchants, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
Poultry and Wild Game, 65, 66,67 California 
Market, S. F. ^"All orders attended to at the 
shortest notice. Goods delivered Free of Charge to 
any part of the city. 

.1. W. WOLF. RAI.PU BROWN. W. H. WOLF. 

WOLF, BROWN & CO., 

General Commission Merchants 

And dealers in California and Oregon Produce, 
321 Davis Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

WETMQ&E BROTHERS, 

Commission Merchants, 

Green and Dried Fruit, Produce, Eggs, Etc. 
Consignments Solicited. 624 & 626 Sansome St., S. F. 



P. STEIN HAGEN & CO., 
Fruit and General Commission Merchants 

BRICK storks: 
408 & 410 Davis St., San Francisco. 



WITTLAND & FREDRICKSON, 

Commission Merchants, 

All Kinds of Green and Dried Fruits. 
ooNsioNHENTb SOLICITED. 324 Davis St,, S. F. 



EVELETH & NASH, 

Commission Merchants, 

422 Front St., and 221, 223, 22.5 and 227 Washington St. 
Consignors receive the i)enefit of our large shipping trade. 



CPENCERIAN 

Oteelpens 

AKe. The Best i 



Established 1800. 

USED BY THE BEST PENMEN 

Mated for Superiority of MetuI, 

Uniformity, and Durability. 

20 Samples for trial, post-paid, lo Cents. 

IVISON, BLAKE-MAN, TAYLOR, & CO., 

753 and 755 Broadway, New York. 



MISSION ROCK DOCK 
CRA!N WAREHOUSE, 

SAN KKANCISCO, CAL. 

1^ nnn tons capacity. ne\ C\C\n 

I Kjf\jyJKJ storage at Lowest Rates. ' fJ,\JyJ\J 

CHAS. H. SINCLAIR, Supt. 
Oal. Dry DocKICo., props. Office, 318.Cal St. room 8, 



56 



pACIFie f^URAlD f RESS. 



[Jan. 15, 1887 



iS* B» fliAt^KET J^Ef OF^T 



Note.— Our quntitioaa are tor Wednesday, not Satur- 
day, ths'dace tlic paper bears. 



Weekly Market Review. 

DOMBSTIO PBODUOB, ETO. 

San Francisco, Jan. 12, 1887. 

The past week pissed without any features de- 
serving of spscial notice. Cereals weakened off, but 
at the close were stronger. W'heat abroad has been 
reported easy, but to-day a better tone reported. 
To-day's cable is as follows: 

London, January 12, 1887. — (Cargoes off coast, 
nothing offering; cargoes on passage and for ship- 
ment, buyers hold off; Mark Lane, quiet; California 
wheat, off coast, 38s; California wheat, just shipped, 
38s gd; California wheat, nearly due, 37s gd; En- 
glish country market, turn dearer; French country 
market, turn dearer; Liverpool wheat, spot, very 
dull; Liverpool wheat, California, 7s sd t0 7s8d; 
weather in England, wet. 

Foreign Review. 

London, Jan. 10. — The Mark Lane Express, in its 
review of the British grain trade during the past 
week says: The trade in English wheat has been in- 
active, but values have been maintained owing to 
supplies being limited. The sales of 1-^nglish wheat 
during the week were 30,817 quarters at 35s 4d, 
against 39.961 quarters at 29s lod during the cor- 
responding week of last year. Klour is steady. For- 
eign wheats have rather slackened off during publi- 
cation of the London stocks, which show an excess 
over the general estimate. The increased quanti- 
ties afloat, combined with the continued accumula- 
tions in .\iuerioa, also had their influence on prices. 
At to-day's market wheats were quiet. Flour was 
quiet. Oats 3@6c higher. 

Eastern Wool Markets. 
Boston, Jan. 8. — The sales of all kinds of wool 
during the past week have been 3,818,100 pounds. 
Tra.isactions in domestic wool show considerable 
increase over the previous week. This is usually a 
quiet week, stock-taking and the settling of the 
year's accounts occupying considerable lime of the 
dealers, liusiness would have been larger but for 
the moving of two of the most prominent houses in 
the trade. The market has been enlivened by the 
presence of a number of manufacturers and a more 
favorable tone of advices from abroad. I'he week 
has shown a steady and firm market, with some 
slight concessions of fractions of cents granted to 
move large lines, but without any material change 
in the prices. \\ the close, holders were firm in 
their views and felt encouraged at the situation. In 
spring California, no sales of consequencH have been 
reported, and stocks are small. F all California has 
been moved quite freely, one lot of 300,000 pounds 
and another of 50,000 pounds having been sold on 
private terms. Oregon wool is quite active. Sales 
have been reoorted of 60,000 pounds valley, at 28c; 
20,000 pounds valley at 25c; 30,000 pounds Eastern 
at 2o(aj,zic; 15,000 Eastern at i6@i7c; and 205,000 
pounds on private termj. The receipts of the week 
have been 4169 bales of domestic and 1284 bales of 
foreign, against 5682 bales of domestic and 1274 
bales of foreign, for the corresponding week last 
year. 

New York, Jan. 9. — The wool market has re- 
mained steady and unchanged. There are believed 
to be no stocits of importance in the interior. The 
transactions of the week were in moderate lots, but 
make a considerable total. The amount of domes- 
tic wool in New York, on laiiuary i, was 6.918,000 
pounds, including California spring, Oregon R. C, 
422,000 pounds; fall. 450,000 pounds, and 10,755,- 
000 pounds of foreign; total, 17,673.000 pounds. 
The total stock of domestic wool at lioston on Jan- 
uary ist was 26,251,000 pounds, including 811,000 
pounds of California spring, 2,302,000 pounds of 
California and 1,959,000 pounds Oregon. Total 
stock of foreign, 2,449,000 (jpunds. Total, 28,695,- 
000. Quotations: California spring, i2@24c; ter- 
ritory, 22@28c. The Philadelphia market has 
shown increased activity, particularly in low and 
medium wools. -Among sales were 115,000 terri- 
tory at 2i@26^c, 50,000 pounds fine territory at 
i8@i9C, 30,000 pounds fine medium at 24c, and 
27,000 pounds fine medium Montana at 26(ui2yc. 
At Philadelphia, sales included 1500 pounds Cali- 
fornia low at ISC 3000 pounds medium territory at 
20c, and 4000 pounds medmm territory at 25@26c. 

PlliLADF.l.l'lllA, Jan. II. — Prices are steady and 
unchanged, with an improved demand for low and 
medium wools. 

Boston, Jan. 11. — Wool is firmer. Michigan 
X, 32c; Ohio, 34c; No. I combing, 40@4ic; fine 
delaine, 34@37C. Other kinds are unchanged. 

New York, Jan. 11. — The wool market issteady, 
but quiet. Domestic fleeces, 30@38; pulled wools, 
i4@35; Texas 9@29c. 

Dried and Canned Fruit at the East. 

Cmii .\(;ii, Jan. 9. — C;alifornia oranges were no- 
ticed on the market here yesterday, and are sold at 
$3.50 per half box. The market is rather weak for 
oranges in general, there being plenty on hand of 
all varieties, while the sales are rather slow. Prices 
for dried fruits are quoted steady and firm for all 
lines of domestic fruit; at the same time the market 
rules rather quiet. The arrivals are such that the 
offerings remain small. Prices remain about steady 
for all California varieties, with the exception of 
raisins, which are quoted easy at a price a shade 
lower than last mentioned. Quotations are as fol- 
lows by the pound: French prunes, ioJ<@ii5^c; 
pitted prunes, ii@i3c; halved peaches, i2@i4Xc; 
peaches, halved and pared, 25c; nectarines, 9c; and 
pears 8j^c. Raisins per 20-pound boxes each: 
London layers, (1.55®!. 60; loose Muscatels, $1.35 
©1.40. 

New York, Jan. 9. — In canned goods, the 
past week, the principal feature of interest has 
been the sudden increase in the demand for 
corn. Packers are now open to contracts for next 
season's growth, and buyers are in the market to 
cover anticipated wants and already some 15,000 
cases of Maine corn have been contracted for at 
$1.25 f. o. b. Tomatoes are firmer. Canned peaches 
sue dull but strong. California pears, $2.50(^3.25. 



Raisins are more active and firmer. Two-crown, 
loose Muscatel, $1. 40(1/ 1.45; London layers, $1.90 
@i.95; California, loose, $i.6o@i.8o; do London, 
$i.90@2. Prunes— Turkish are weaker on free 
offerings at $4. 50(0 4. 75; F'rench, steady at 7"a(S!8c 
for sixties and nineties. Currants are weaker on 
large arrivals, selling at4 "8@5C. Citrons quiet at 

California Baislns at the East. 

New York, Jan. )i. — The Commercial liutletiii 
says: California raisins have developed an easier 
tendency, due wholly to the actions of Western op- 
erators, particularly in Chicago. In that city some 
holders endeavored to work off their surplus stock, 
and selected Philadelphia as the market to bring 
their good? to the attention of Eastern buyers. The 
supplies forwarded are of very good quality, though 
iirobably not up to the standard of the principal 
packs that have been sold here since the opening of 
the season. They are Fresno goods, and with the 
average buyer would be taken without hesitation. 
These are offered in J'hiladelphia at $1.40 for two- 
crown loose, $1.55 for three-crown and $1.85 for 
London. The more popular brands of this market 
are held and are selling at $1.40 to $1.80, and $1.90 
and $1.70(0)2 respectively. If Chicago holders con- 
tinue to push these goods at the former quotations 
it is doubtful if our city commission men can main- 
tain the market, and the result will be a loss to the 
California shippers. 

California Products In Ne'w York. 

New York, Jan. 9. — lijans — California Lima 
steady at $1.80(^1.90. Seeds — California yellow 
mustard, 3 Ji(o;4!!(c. About 800 bags of California 
rape, most of which had been previously sold, re- 
cently arrived, but buyers generally refused to ac- 
cept deliveries on the ground of inferior quality. 
The goods were then reoffered at low prices. The 
nominal quotation is 2.%c. 

Ne'w York Hop Market. 

New York, Jan. 9. — The market is without en- 
couraging features for sellers. Brewers buy in a 
hand-to-mouth way, and the supply of foreign and 
domestic goods is still sufficient to keep values un- 
settled. Coast crop of 1886, nrime to choice 24(0), 
2sc; some fair to good, 2o@23c; 1885, good to 
prime, 8(Siioc. 

New York Wheat Market. 

New York, Jan. 9. — Wheat has showed fair re- 
quest, and sales have generally been at full im- 
proved prices. Spot closed Mc higher, and options 
clos3d iii@2yic lower for the week. 

Local Markets. 

WHEAT— Notwithstanding unfavorable foreign 
advices our market holds very strong, with buyers un- 
able to purchase much even at quotations. The 
stock in the State is below general expectations, 
although the Rltral Press' estimate of the crop 
out-turn, published in July last, did not warrant any 
larger stock on hand. On Call, transactions have 
been free, with high prices maintained up to Tuesday 
when a lower range was established, with another de- 
cline this morning, although actual wheat was no 
lower. To-day's sales were as follows on Call: 

Morning Session: Buyer season — 1600 tons, 
$i.65K; 500. $i-6sH; 200, $1.65^; 300. S1.65M; 
1000, $i.65X; 200, $1.65}^; 4300, $1 65; 4500, 
$i.64>i; 1000, $1.64^ ^ ctl. Afternoon Session: 
Buyer season — 1900 tons, $1.65^^; 2000, $i.65K; 
iioo. $i.65Ji ; 500, $i.6sJi; 1000, $1.66; 700, $1.66;^ 

BARLEY — The market held strong at advancing 
prices up to yesterday, when a decline set in, owing 
to the Produce Exchange reporting the stock in the 
.State at over 125,000 tons; but to-day the market is 
higher, owing to a large short interest and large op- 
erators having confidence in the market. On Call, 
transactions the past week were very large. The 
following are to-day's sales: 

Morning Session: Buyer season — 200 tons, $1.18; 
iioo, $i.i8K; 400, $i.i8J4; 1400, $1.18^; 700, 
$1.18^; 1200, $i.i8K. Seller season — 100 tons, 
$i.iiK; 100 tons, $1.11 May — 100 tons, $1.13 
^ ctl. Afternoon .Session: Buyer season — 1400 tons, 
$1.19; 200. $i.i8K; 900, $I.I9J^; 1800, $1.19^; 
100, $i.i9K- May — 100 tons, $i.i35i; 100, $1.13}^. 
Seller season — 100 tons, $1.13; 100, $1.13^ ctL 

BUTTER — The market is demoralized, with buy- 
ers masters of the situation. The supply of pickled 
pressing the market is largely in excess of the con- 
sumptive demand, which breaks the market for 
fresh. 

CHEESE — The market is stiff, with much diffi- 
culty reported by the retail trade in getting choice. 

EIjGS — The market closed the week strong at 
the reduced quotations. The consumption is very 
large, which keeps the market well cleaned up. 

B.A(jS — The market is quiet, with no speculative 
movement noticeable. Buyers are deterred from 
entering the market, owing to continued dry weather. 

i'LOUR — The market is strong at the last quoted 
advance. Both the export and home demand is 
active, but with buyers trying hard to obtain con- 
cessions. 

[COMMUNICATIID.] 

Market Information. 

Fruits. 

Heavy frosts on Monday and Tuesday nights are 
reported to have done considerable damage to 
oranges in the orange-growing districts of the .Siate. 
The orange market is steady, with a firm tone for 
the better selected. The demand is increasing for 
both the home trade and shipping north. 

Limes and lemons continue weak and in buyers' 
favor. 

Apples, contrary to general expectations, do not 
appreciate, although choice are reported scarce and 
wanted. Common are slow to place except at low 
prices. 

Dried fruits continue to rule firm, with full prices 
obtainable. The quality of all received so far shows 
a decided improvement over former seasons. The 
East reports stiff and active markets. 

Raisins show a stronger tone, with a good demand 
from the East for the better selected. The stock in 
this city is light for the season, yet it is more than 
enough to meet the trade up to the new season. 
Dealers claim that the bulk now here w ill be mar- 
keted at the East this spring. 

Cereals. 

Oats continued strong through the week, although 
dealers tried to obtain concessions on asking prices. 



Receipts are not large, neither are the supplies to 
draw from. 

The Stock of Grain. 

The Directors of the San Francisco Produce Ex- 
change have submitted the following report of the 
stocks of flour and leading cereals of the old crop 
remaining in the State of California January i, 1887, 
and a comparative statement of previous years: 



n — a " B." B.^ S. 

t - -I* -,- -n- Z~ »- O 

- - -I — -3 

rf, ^ rr. 1^ rr ^ — ~ — ^ 



03 ."^ oc IX oc r 



oooe 



00 ■ 00 . 



63= = 3 

o c 
o'o'aj? 



5 S 



o cr s> ' 



■ 'Si 



.......... 00 ii5 S 

'ssse 

: : : ; : : : : : 2?'c«' I 

WW WWW %?ir- 

£co;3c 

g 3-2 S c 

:::::::::: o .3 ^'■^■^ 



S : 
>-?° ■ 

D S O.- 

S 3 3 : 
roo. 



'B- 
^» o ^; 

ill'; 

: ? p 2.' 
-i-jO o ■ 

- . C . 

2: B : 



-IC»itO--CT-J-lH-'CXJ"-JOOQO 

to bi W cx> o'r* OS oo"Qo'»-'"ce"*« 
1^. — ■i^wSoSooooiC;' 



' 9t A V> O CO a 



CD to y tc (» 



'MiOCOClC-tn^PtiOWCBCC 
S JO O CC CO O O OOOJO o o 



o> ^3 10 n 4 



1 f ci o in 



O W 4- « f >- rc Ui 

_o J. y CI p— 

O QOOQOWO 



'■I Cd ro 

ifa. O-iJDOJtOCtO 
*. y> y, *. O -J 

i iMiir" 



si 

?9 



67,400 
31,180 

107,440 
304.710, 

5^,450 
149,330 

10,300 
118,050 

3.5,143 
15,744 
96,210 


"to "Oi'v" w 

i S§: 8: §8 


n C 


■ h- r8 

,-• -4 to rfk «0 01 Ui fX) * 0^ 
CO j».cc eojo ,*-_oi • .WW 


oc • • 

^ 0> . , ^ 00 

^' • s ss " ^ 
■ • 


■ s 

» c 


130,650' 
27,625 

72,100 
148,43J 
16,110 
91,220 
57,420 
90,805 
01,597 
157,716 
94,210 
2-28,037 


-J h- W 

» 00 oo^j-*.® 
"q OS c>o'"^'w'o*q 

OOOOGOO 


Corn, 
Ctl8. 


44,650 
1,080 

32,875 
61,300 
30,100 
58,910 

8,125 
23,665 

3,021 
82,059 

3,820 
17,742 


S50 

4,100 
40.000 


ft so 



Corn is essentially unchanged. Dealers talk the 
market for Californian down while paying an ad- 
vance on quotations. Choice corn is not in liberal 
supply. Western advices indicate an advance soon. 

The wheat market has ruled strong throughout 
the week, with buyers unable to secure any consid- 
erable sized parcels without paying an advance on 
current bids. The bulk of the wheat now in the 
.State is in strong hands, rendering it next to an im- 
possibility to buy at less than asking prices. Several 
buyers express the opinion that toward assessment 
day there will be liberal selling orders, but holders 
hold to a contrary view, and think that owing to the 
light supply that is very liable to be available at that 
time, prices will be forced up regardless of taxes. 
The cold, dry weather is causing considerable un- 
necessary uneasiness, for the ground was well soaked 
last winter and spring, and consequently can stand 
a dry winter; what is more to be feared are the hot 
north winds which generally prevail in May or June. 
The stock of wheat in the United Kingdom on Jan- 
uary I, 1887, was only one-half the quantity held 
January I, 1886. It is now claimed that IVru will 
draw considerable from us, owing to the Chili ports 
Dcing closed against her people. The course of for- 
eign grain markets, as for some months past, strength- 
ens the position of those who look for an advance in 
prices, so far as the statistical position of grain is 
concerned, and London particularly is slow to weak- 
en. The London .Miller of December 13th says: 
P'rom no quarter in sight is there any promise what- 
ever that wheat supplies for the next three months 
can equal the country's certain requirements. Some 
further diminution of granary stocks is a probability 
generally acknowled,ged. The quantity afloat, after 
fx-ing for many months in excess of the quantity due 
to arrive a year ago, is now less in comparison, and 
while Indian shippers are quiet, Russian exporters 
have almost to a man retired from offers at Novem- 
ber's prices. America has its stock, and will know 
how to whip it up. The London correspondent of 
the Minneapolis Miller wrote on December 7th: 
America has the reins entirely in her own hands. 
Europe wants something like 2,000,000 bushels per 
week from the Atlantic ports in wheat and flour dur- 
ing the next five or six months, and the question 
only remains, is this easy of accomphsh- 
ment? « * » With regard to the probable 
extent of our stocks at the close of this 
year, I anticipate that they will be reduced to 
10,000,000 bushels, against 27.000,000 at the same 
time last year, compared to which the present difter- 
ence of 4,000,000 bushels in your visible supply is a 
mere nothing. The London Q)rn Trade Liit, 
December 17th, states that the mild weather per- 
mitted navigation from St. Petersburg to remain o])en 
to an unusually late date. South Russian wheat ex- 
ports are mainly to Mediterranean ports. .^^ Odessa 
supplies are small. Wheal prices in some portions 
of Russia are reported above those in England. 
Austria-Hungary is not exporting much. .-\ good 
share of Indian, Russian and American wheat ex- 
ports are going to France, Italy and Spain. 

The barley market held to strong prices up to 
Tuesday, due to continued cold and dry weather, 
with stocks in this .State well concentrated. This 
year's harvest it is now very generally admitted 
will be later than last year, while the consumption is 
larger. Experienced dealers are favorably impressed 
with the situation, and hold firmly to the belief that 
the market will do much better before next harvest. 
Live-stock. ' 

Beef cattle continue to press the market, with 
only something very choice, which can be cut up with- 
out much wastage, fetching full quotations. Mutton 



sheep are without essential change. Hogs continue 
in buyers' favor. 

In horses the market is slow, with only well- 
matched teams selling at good prices. 

The following are the wholesale rates of slaugh- 
terers to butchers: 

BEEF — Extra, 7(®7}^c; first 'grade, grass fed, 
6j5@7C per lb. ; second grade, 5}^ (g6c; third grade, 

MUTTON— Ewes, 5(0;— c; wethers, sJi@— c 

LAMB — .Spring, 6(a!jc. 'V'earlings, — c. 

VEAL— Large, 7(^8c; small, 9H to 10c. 

PORK — Live hogs, s'4 to 3c for heavy and me- 
dium; hard dressed, 4 to 6c per lb; light. 2}^ to 3c; 
dressed, 3^^ to 4'Ac\ soft hogs, live, t0 2jic. 
On foot, one-third less for grain or stall fed, and 
one-half less for stock running out. 

Feedstuffs. 

Ground barley is not quite so strong at the ad- 
vance. Bran, middlings, and oilcake meal are 
steady. 

Hay was sold at an advance the past week, owing 
to the dry weather keeping supplies back. It is 
claimed that the crop this year will not be large. 

The market is quotable as follows: .\lfalfa, $9.50 
(2,12; barley, $8(^11; oats, $8(gii; cow hay, $8(^ 
11.50; •A'heat, $io(!gi3 ^ ton. 

'Vesetables. 

Potatoes sold at an advance the past week, under 
freer buying and moderate receipts. The supply of 
choice continues light. 

Onions held to strong prices up to Tuesday, w hen 
owing to freer receipts the market eased off, but 
close steady to-day. 

Cabbages are steady, as are root vegetables. 

Dried ochra and dried peppers are fairly steady at 
current quotations. 

Miscellaneous. 

The tonnage movement compares with last year at 
this date as follows : 

1887. 1886. 

On the way 215,986 155,490 

In port, disengaged 84,255 121,478 

In port, engaged .39.349 38,445 

"^o'als 339.590 315.413 

The above gives a carrying capacity, as follows: 
'887. 543.344 short tons; 1886, 504,662 short tons; 
increase over last yeiir, 38,282. 

There is very little doing in grass seed, causing 
prices to favor buyers. 

Beans continue to hold to strong prices, with all 
choice quickly taken at full prices. 

Ducks are higher owing to the Chinese new year, 
but other fowls are barely steady. 

San Francisco, Jan. 12, 18S7. 



Domestle Froduoe. 

Extra clioict; in good ]>acka«u3 (etch au adrance on top 
quotutiuua. wblle very poor Krailcs sell le.<3 thaa the lower 
qiiotatioua. Wbdnbsuat, Jan. 12, U87. 



BEANS Am) FBAB. 
Ba7o,o(l 1 4C 1 55 



1 25 @ 1 B 

1 i;o @ 1 7j 

1 23 S 1 40 
) 2i a 1 4U 
1 (W @ - 
1 CO @ 1 70 
Llni* 2 00 @ 2 45 

Fid Peu,blli eye 1 00 @ 1 05 | River reda I 00 

do KTeen 1 00 1 12t Humboldt .. . 

do Nilea 1 25 @ — ' do Kiduey. 

BKOOM OORN. ;Ohile 

SoutbempertuD 50^ 75 do Oregon 



Butter 

Pea 

Red , 

Piuk 

Large 'Wblte 
8maU White 



[-Peanut* 4|^ — 

Pllberta 10 11 

P0TATOF.8. 

Burbaok 1 20 @ 1 70 

Karly Rose 00 M 1 19 

Culfey Cove 1 10 S 1 45 

Jersey Blues... 1 10 @ 1 50 

Fetalumo. — @ — 

Tomales 1 00 1 40 



75 



1 20 I 
1 25 I 



18 



10 I 



Northern iicrtou 50 
0H1(X>EY. 

California. 4 

German Si 

DAIRY PRODUCE 

BUTTER. 

Cal. treeb roll. It. 20 @ 

do Fancy br'nda 2^3 

Pickle roU 15 ® 

Firkin, new 15 # 

Eastern — @ — 

OaBBSK 

Oheeae,0al., lb.. 13 10 
Eastern style... 15 @ 17 

E008. 

Oal.. ranch, doL. 26 @ 27; 

do. store ^^^^ 

Ducks ~ ^ ~ 

Oregon ""^ " 

Eastern — M — 

Utah. — a — 

FEED. 

Bran, ton IS 50 @16 50 

Oornmeal 2« 00 @27 00 

CJr'd Barley ton. 23 00 @26 00 

Hay 9 OO @I4 50 

Middllncs 19 50 ©22 00 

OU Cake Me»l. 28 50 @28 50 

Straw, bale 35 @ 50 

FLOUR. 

Extra. City Mills 4 531(9 4 91 !Lard 
do Co'ntry Mills 4 35 @ 4 77i Cal.Smok«dBee{ II. 

Superhue 3 35 @ 3 90 Hams, Cal 10 

GRAIN, ETC. j do Eastern.. 13 

Barley, feed, cU. 1 10 @ 1 2J i SEEDS. 

do Brewing.. 1 15 rd 1 JO Alfalfa. 9 

" "■ - - 1 60 Canary 3 



Peerless. , 

Salt Lake 

$ 41 Sweet Ijl 2 

J 7 ; POULTRY AlTD GAME 

ETO. Hens, doz 6 OO M 7 SO 

Roosters G 00 @ 7 50 

25 I BroUen 4 00 A 6 00 

- Ducks, tame.... 6 00 (3 U 00 
17i do Mallard.... 2 00 # 3 50 

do Sprig 1 00 @ 1 SO 

a«eae. pair 1 00 3 00 

do Oosliiigs . .. — @ — 
Wild Gray, doz 3 OO a — 

Turkeys, lb 13 « 15 

do Dressed.. 14 16 
TurkeyFeatbets, 
tail and wing.. 
Snipe, Eng., doz. 
do Common.. — « 

[loves 75 & 

yuall 90 I 

Rabblta 1 00 \ 

Hare 1 50 8 

Venison i % 

PROVISIONS. 
Cal. Bacon, 

Heavy, Si 

Medium SiS 

Light lOil 

Extra Light... Ufi 



Chevalier 1 45 

do Coast... 90 

Bnokwheat 1 00 

Com, WWte.... — 

Yaiow 1 05 

SmaU Round. 1 10 @ 1 15 

Nebraska 97iS 1 <X> 

Oats, new — ® — 

Choice feed 1 55 @ I 65 Millet, German.. 

dognod 1 40 @ 1 50 ! do (Common. 



I 1 45 
I 1 20 



I 1 10 



Clover red 12 

Wblte 17. ( 

Cotton 

Flaxseed 

Hemp 

Italian EyeGraaa 
Perennial. 



do fair 1 30 (8 1 37i 

do black 1 40 @ 1 55 

do Oregon 1 30 @ 1 60 

Eye 1 10 g 1 25 

Wheat milling 



Mustard, white.. 

Brown 

Rape 

Er. Blue Grass., 
id quaUty 



Gilt edged.. 1 65 (3 1 67l'8weetV. G; 



Ho 'IKoloe 1 60 (» 

di (air to good 1 55 (« — I 
fShippiug choice I 6o @ - - I 

do good 1 574<g 1 GO 1 

do lair 1 50 @ 1 55 

HIDES. 

Dry - @ 

Wet salted 8 @ 

HONEY, ETO. 

Beeswax. &> '^^ ^ 

Honey in comb. 9 @ 
Honey in comb, 

fancy 12 @ 

Extracted, light. 4 M 
do dark. 3iS 
HOPS. 

Orecon 20 (§ 

OalUomia 20 @ 

ONIONS. 

Pickling — @ 

Silversiln 1 00 @ 

NUTS— JOBHIKO. 

Walnuts, Cal., lb Vl\m 

do Chile. - § 

Almonds, hdshl. 6@ 

Soft sbeU 15 m 

Brazil 10 « 

Pecans » @ 



le 



12 



! 1 90 



Orobard.. 

R«d Top 16 i 

Hungarian.... 8 ^ 

Lawn 30 u 

MesQult 10 I 

Timothy Sil 

TALLOW. 

9i Crude, lb li^ 

Refined 

WOOL, ETC 

HTBINU — 1886 

Humboldt and 
Mendocino . . . 
Soct'o valley.... 
Free Mountain . 
Nliern defective 
S Joaijuin short. 

do long 

Oava'v & F'tbll. 
Oregon Eastern. 

do valley 23 a 

Southern Coaitt. 13 ^ 

FAI,L-1886 

Southern, free. . 17 

do defective.. 12i(« 

Northern, free.. 20 iit 

do defective.. 15 ii* 

Middle free 18 (a 

do defective., IS (£S 



Hi, 



22 I 
17 
17 I 

14 ( 



17 ( 



Jan. 15, 1887.] 



pACIFie f^URAlo PRESS. 



57 



Fruits and Vei^etables. 

Extra choice in good packages fetcli an advance on top 
quotations, wliile very poor grades sell less than the lower 



quotatioas. 
Apples, bi com., 50 @ 1 10 

do choice 1 25 @ 1 75 

Bananas, bunch. 1 50 @ 3 00 
Blackberries, ch. — @ — 
CanteloTipes, cr, — @ — 

Cherries blk — @ — 

do Royal Ann.. — @ — 
Cherry plums... — (0 — 

Crabapples 1 25 @ 1 75 

Cranberries 10 uO Lal2 5U 

Currants chest... — @ — 

Figs, bx — @ — 

Grapes 1 00 @ 2 75 

do Rose Peru. — @ — 

do Muscat — — 

do Tokays.... — @ — 

Isabel — W — 

Wiue, Zinfandel — @ 1 00 

do MioSiou — @ — 

Limes, Mei 4 50 (J5 6 — 

do Cal. box . . . 50 @ 1 00 
Lemons, C»I.,bx 1 00 @ 1 60 
do Sicily, box. 2 00 @ 2 50 
do Australian. — @ — 
Nectarines, box. — @ — 
Oranges, Com bx 1 5" @ 2 00 

do Choice 2 25 @ 3 10 

do Navels 3 UO @ 5 00 

do Panama... — @ — 

Peaches, bi — @ — 

do bask — @ — 

Crawfords, bx — (ft — 
do bskt.. — @ — 

do choice — @' — 

Pears bx — (cO 

do choice — @ — 

do Bartlett, bx 
Pe r s i m m o D 3, 

Jap, bx 1 00 @ 1 50 

Pineapples, doz. 4 00 @ 5 UO 
Pomegranates, b 



Wkdnesuav. Jan. 12, 1887. 
Raspberries ch.. — @ — 
Strawberries cb. 5 00 @ 6 GO 
WatermelonslOO — @ 
DRIED FRUIT. 
Apples, sliced, & 5 @ 6^ 
do evaporated. 11 @ 125 
do quartered .. 4 @ 5 

Apricots 13 m 15 

do evaporated 20 @ 22 
Blackberries.... .9 & 11 



9 l_ 

Citron IS dt 



IB @ 

8 m 
18 en 

5 @ 
4 @ 

10 @ 

9 ® 
3 & 

6 @ 



Plums lb 
Prunes bx 

do F.gg 

Quinces bx 

Beets, sk 

Cabbage, 100 B>s. 

Carrots, sk 

Cauliflower, doz. 
Eggplant, ....bx 
Qarlic, lb new.. 
Green Com, 
small box. .. 

do large box. . 
Green Peas, lb. . 
Lettuce, doz.... 
Lima Beans lb. . 
Mushrooms, bx. 



- « 

- @ 

- <a 

- @ 

1 00 ® 

50 @ 
25 m 

- @ 

- @ 



- @ 

- @ 



Dates 9 & 

Figs, pressed.... 5 @ 

Figs, loose 3 @ 

Nectarines 8 & 

do evaporated 

Peaches 

do pared 

Pears, sliced.... 

do qrtd 

do evaporated 
Plump, pitted. . . 
do unpitted. .. 

Prunes 

do French 8 @ 10 

Zante Currants. » @ — 

RAISINS. 
DehesaClus, fey 2 65 @ — 
Imperial Cabin- 
et, fancy.... 1 90 (g — 
Crown London 

Layers, fey. . I 70 @ — 
do Loose Mus- 
catels, fancy 1 60 @ — 
do Looee Mus- 
catels 1 50 @ — 

— Cal. Valencias.. 1 50 (a _ 

do Layers 1 50 @ — 

do Sultanas... 1 50 («? — 
Fractions come 25, 50 and 75 
cents higher for halves, quar- 
ters and eighths. 

VEGETABLES. 
Artichokes, doz. — — 
Asparagus box.. — @ — 
do cultivated. — @ — 
75 Okra, dry, lb... 10 « 12i 
35 do green box.. — @ — 
Parsnips, ctl.... 1 50 Q — 
Peppers, dry lb.. 10 @ — 
do preen, bx.. 40 (a 60 
Pumpkins i)rton]2 00 @15 00 
Squash, Marrow 

fat, too 7 00 @12 00 

do Summer bx 25 @ 40 
String beans 111. . — ® — 
Tomatoes box.. — @ — 
Turnips ctl 76 @ 1 00 



Easy Binder. 

Dewey's patent elastic binder, for periodicals, 
music and other printed sheets, is the handiest, best 
and cheapest of all economical and practical file 
binders. Newspapers are quickly placed in it and 
held neatly, as in a cloth-bound book. It is dura- 
ble and so simple a child can use it. Price, size of 
Mining and Scientific Press, Rural Press, Watch- 
man, Fraternal Record. Masonic Record, Harper's 
Weekly, and Scientific American, 75 cents; postage, 
10 cents. Postpaid to subscribers of this paper, 50 
cents. Send for illustrated circular. Agents wanted. 



A Transpcsition. — Readers who attempted 
to read the articles on " Fruit Shipping " and 
" Grape Growers' Meeting " on the first page of 
last week's Rural, were probably much coa- 
fused. By an unusual mishap the printer mis- 
mated the parts of the articles, making the end 
of one fit the beginning of the other. Mechan- 
ically it looked well, but the sense rebelled. 
The end of the first article, beginning with the 
words " spurious wines," belongs to the second 
article, and the end of the second, beginning 
with the word " hardship," belongs to the first. 



Don't FaU to Write. 

Should this paper be received by any subscriber who 
does not want it, or beyond the time he intends to pay 
for it, let him not fail 'to write us direct to stop it. A postal 
card (costing one cent only) will suihce. We will not know 
inglv send the paper to anyone who does not wish it, but 
if it is continued, through the failiu-e of the subscriber to 
notify us to discontinue it, or some irresponsible party re- 
quested to stop it, we shall positively demand payment for 
the time it is sent. Look OAHErULLy at the label on 

VOUR PAPER. 



Miss Tracy's School Work, formerly carried 
on at 1825 Telegraph avenue, has been trans- 
ferred to 1061 Oak street, Oakland. Lessons 
are given either privately or in classes. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Socieiy. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1886, the Board 
of Directors ot The German Savings and Loan Society 
has declared a dividend at the rate of tour and thirty-two 
one-hiindrcdtha (4 3'2100) per cent per annum on term 
deposits and three and sixty one-hundredths (3 60-100) 
per cent per annum on ordinary deposits, n.ayable on and 
after the 3d day of January, 1887. By order. 

GEO. LETTE, Secretary. 



CLIMAX SPRAY PUMPS. 

To those in want of a flrst-clasg ."^pray Pump we can 
say that these Puinps are, without a doubt, the very 
best Spray Pumps to-day in the market. Made expressly 
for service in the Orchard, and the only Pump having all 
its parts, valves, etc., made of non-corrosive metal, and 
has received the highest awards over all others for the 
past three years. Send for circulars and prices. 

CLIMAX SPRAY PUMPS, 

18 California St., S. F. 



fDr.PIEECE'| 

w Only Torfect 
a| BodyBattHry 
^uverinvent'd 
>'GivesftnElec 
t^jtric Currfint 
gl wither wiTH- 
■JouT ACIDS. 

tlELKOTRlC SUSPENROUY 
oFREEwith every Hf*It. 




ELECTEIC 

BELT 

Bebt MAI>£t 
Chronic Dis- 
eases of DOth 
KEXFsCureJ 
thoiitMcdioinc 
Estab. ]H75. Send for 
Free Pamphlet N0.2. 
= Uddre'^s. MAGNETIC ELASTIC TRUSS CO-, 
Cj304 NORTH SIXTH STREET. ST. LOUIS MO . 
81704 SAC'MENTO ST.. SAN FRANCISCO. CAX.. 

PALAG£ 

DYE WORKS, 

(533 Market St. under Palace Hotel, San Francisco, CaL 

All kinds of L.idies' and Gents' G.-irments Cleaned and 
Pyed. WE EXCEL. Send for Circular of I'rices. 

CHAS. J. HOL.»E!$, ^lanager. 



BATCHELOR & WYLIE, 

SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST OF THE 

ACME STEAM HEAT EVAPORATORS. 




No moving of iTrays after Fruit enters the machine. Any temperature desired can be main- 
tained uniformly throughout the entire machine. We can yield a heavier product, at less ex- 
pense for fuel and labor, than is done by any other system. 
*®"See them in operation now at our place. 

BATCHELOR & WYLIE, No. 37 iVlarket St., San Francisco. 



FRUIT TREE SEEDLINGS 

FROM FRANCE! 

I take pleasure in calling your attention to my special 
price of Seedlings 

NOW READY FOR SHIPMENT : 

PER 1000. 

Apple Seedlings $6 00 

Pear Seedlings 8 00 

Cherry (Mazzard) 8 00 

Plum (Myrobolan) 8 00 

<y The above Seedlings are imported from France, 
and are all in prime order. Also choice Bartlett Pear 
and Apple Trees. 

J. T. BOGUE, 

Martinez, Cal. 




HOKSB POWERS, WINDMILLS, TANKS 
and all kinds of Pumping Machmery built to order. 
Awarded Diploma for Windiallln at iWe- 
fhanics' Fair. 1885. Windmills from 865. Horse 
Powers from $50. F. W. KROGH & CO., 51 
Beats street. San Francisco. 




SEEDS ^^"^ 



FREE. 



Warranted. Fr. sh.Ki iiai.ic 
Tested "fiN cheap, liins- 
trtui-.i ( Sent free. 

I'riicK lowest, r^iclii ls s 
(i.ir.lciK I S my <i"r seeds nre 
tht best. Tlious.iiiiNi.t i liowe 



i-Uc 



given away. 



list 

ALNEER BROS., 

Rockford, III 



OUSHING'S MANUAL 

Of Parliamentary Practice, 

RcTined l>y HON. EniUUNn 1^. CU^iHINO. 

The Rtandard authority in all the United States. An In- 
dispenftable Handbook for every meniher of a (lt;Jiberative 
body. Price 75«, For sale by hooksuUers. Sent by mail 
on icceipt of price. Addreas the Publishers, 
THOMPSON, BROWN A CO., Boston, IVfasn. 



HORTICULTURIST— WANTED 

A man to take charge of a place containing a youiis 
orchard, and upon which some grain, etc., is raised. 
Address as stated below, giving age, nationality, experi- 
ence, etc. Refarenoes required. 

U, p. p, po? 8328.L^ftn Francjsco. 



Over 6 OOO^OQO PEOPLE USE 

FERRY'S SEEDS 




C. M. FERRY & CO. 

are admitted to betho 
LARGEST SEEDSMEN 

in ike world. 

M. FERRY i CD'S 

Illustrated. Ilm- 
rripllveJk I'rirpJ 

SEED ANNUAL 
For 1887 

will be mailed 
FREE to all 

applicants, and 
to last season's 
customers 
without or- 
dering it. 
Invaluable to 
e\\. Every per- 
soil using Gar- 
dfj,. Field or 

. SKEnS s/mi//^ 

8e7id /'oT it. Address 
0. M. FERRY & CDr 
Detroit, Mich. 



MACHINISTS. ATTENTION! 



AN OUTFIT FOR A MACHINIST. 

Good Tools, Patterns and an Es- 
tablisbed Business 

FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN, 

If applied for Immediately. 

Address, B. A. W., 
Care of this Paper. 



PUMPS 



For irrigation 
and reclamation 

Steam Eiigiues, llor.sc I'owors A WIimI HIUIs. 

Complete Pumping outfits— all sizes— for 
every purpose. The Ijilcst, best 
and rlifiipc.Ht. If you need any 
thing in this Ihio, write to 




Byron Jackson 

"625 St. San Francisco. 



$6000 HOTEL FOR SALE. 

Part cash, it desired, or will trade for either city or 
country property; tine corner in the most desirable part 
of the city of Sacramento; 54 rooms, barroom, etc.; first- 
class walnut furniture and Brussels carpets throughout; 
established ."0 years; always full; clearing, over all ex- 
penses, §3500 per annun; most thorouifh investi^.'-ation o' 
business and books allowed; owner, who has kept it for 
7 years, is about to leave tde State. Arldress, 

A. LEONARD & SON, 
lOH Fourth St , SacratoeDto, Cair 




HORTON & KENNEDY'S 

FAMOUS 

ENTERPRISE 

Self-Reflating 

WINDMILL 

Is recognized as 

THB BKBT. 




Always gives aatlsfaotlon. SIMPLE, 
STRONG and DURABLE In all parts. 
Solid Wrougiit-iron Crank Shalt with 
DOCBLB BEARINGS for the Crank to 
work in, all turned and run in adjust- 
able babbitted boxes. 

Positively Self-Regulating. 

with no oo springs, or springs o any kind. No little 
rode, joints, levers, or anything of the kind to get out of 
order, as such things do. Mills in use 6 to 12 years In 
good order now, that have never cost one cent for repairs. 
All genuine Enterprise Mills for the Paciflc Coast trade 
come only through this agency, and none, whether of 
the old or latest pattern, are genuine except those bear- 
ing the "Enterprise Co." stamp. Look out for this, aa 
inferior mills are being offered with testimonials applied 
to them which were given for ours. Prices to suit th 
times. Full particulars free. Best Pumps, Feed UUIe, 
etc., kept in stock. Address, 

HORTON & KENNEDY. 

SENERAL OFFICE AND SUPPLIES (as always before 
LIVERMORE, ALAMEDA CO., CAL. 

Sao Francisco Agency— JAMBS LINFORTH 
120 Front St. San FranclRCO. 




UNCLE Sam has found it at last! 
A sure romody for Torpid Livor, 
Sick Headache, Habitual Constipation, 
Chills and Fever, and all affections ot the 
Kidneys and Liver. This is a Now Com- 
pound, and one trial will convince you 
tliat it is the Clieapost and Best Remedy 
in the Market fop Diseases of Kidneys, 
Liver and Stomach. If you want a pure 
vegetable compound, that is positively 
guaranteed to contain no mercury, go to 
your Druggist, and get a Bottle of yio 
Arkansaw Liver and Kidney Remedy. 
Price, $1.00 per B ottle. 



For Sale by all Druggists. 




BROWNE'S 
SQUIRREL and GOPHER 
SMOKER. 



$100 Reward to any one 
who will produce one of 
equal merit at tbe same 
expense. 

It is the Cheapest, 

By more than one-half, of any other 
in the market. 

EVERY ONE GUARANTEED, or 
money refunded. I am in every 
way rcsi>on.sibIe. Refer you to the 
Editor of this paper. 

Circular mailed free to any ad- 
dress. 

State, County and Shop 
Rights for Sale. 

Address 
F. E. BROWNE, 



Patented March 2:i, 1886. 



BRICK 



AND 




Loa Aneeln.q. Cal. 

MACHINERY 

BEST IN THE WORLD. 

11(1 for circular prices. 

J. W. PENFIELD & SON, 

\Villuu«hb}, Ohio. 



Stands Uii 



ok Rox 'Hi. 



58 



f ACIFie R.URAli> f RESS. 



[Jan. 15, 1887 



Jeeds, Wants, ttc. 



BftRREN Hill N ursery 



NEVADA CITY, CAL. 

SPECIALTIES : 

NUTS, PRUNES, AND GRAPES. 

The Finest Collection of Nut-Bearing Trees 
to be found in the United States. 

1 9 Varieties of Walnuts, 

— IN'CLrDlXO — 

CLUSTER WALNUT, 

The newest, most prolific and valuable variety ever intro- 
duced into this country. 

PRCEPARTURIENS. 

Or Early-Bearinj,', or Fertile Walnut, introduced into 
California in 1S71 by Felix Gillet. "Second Generation" 
Trees, grown from nuts borne on tlie original tree; 90% 
jjuaranleed to be *'frenuine Prajparturiens," or having 
retained tiie surprising characteristics of precocity, 
fertility and liardlneHH of the original Proepartu- 
riens. "Third Generation" Trees, grown from nuts borne 
on second generation Prmparturiens, entirely Cali- 
fornia-grown; vigorous, liardy and fertile variety. 




"Second Generation" Pros parturl ens. 

Serotina, Franquette, Mayette, Chaberte, 
Gant, Parisienne, Mesange WaUiuts. 

The leading varieties of Europe, highly recommonJed 
for beauty and quality of the nuts, fertility and hardiness 
of the kinds. 

9 Varieties of French Chentnuts or Marrons 

(PropiKated solely by graftmg). 
7 Varieties of Filberts. 

4 Varieties of April Clierrieg, the earliest and 
most prolific in California. 

207 Varieties of Grapes, including the very 
ea'liest Table varieties known, such as Hluo Musrat, 
Ischia, Magdeleine, Malingre, Pearl of Anvers, Bui- 
hery, Luglienda, Dupoiit, Gros Sipat, etc. 

81 Varieties of Knglisli Gooseberries, all 
sizes, shapes and colors, and "true to name." 

PRUNES ! PRUNES ! 

LOT D'ENTE, OR "D ENTE TRUE FROM 
THE ROOT." 

We have ourselves given this name of "Lot D'Knte" 
to this type, so cxtensiv»ly propigated in tlie \ alley of 
the Lot (France) True from the root and not 
grafted, and which we have introiiuced into this country. 
This typo of the D'Ente Prune is not at all propagated by 
grafting, whicli would do away with its chief qualities 
of being more vigorous, more long-lived than grafted 
trees, anrl a gum-resistant stock. 

ST. CATHERINE, "True from the root." 

This kind is altogether propaga'ed true from tl»e 
root in its home, valley of the Loire (France), and offers 
greater advantages than grafted trees, as being also more 
vigorous, more long lived, and a gum-resistant 
stock. 

We highly recommend these two purest types of the 
two most celebrated kinds of French Prunes, and have 
divided our stock into three sizes, which we offer at $20, 
$;iO and $40 per hundred. All such trees are imported 
from the two great i)rune districts of France, but have 
been from one to three years in our grounds, and liave, 
like all our mountain-grown trees, a line system of roots. 

For the Season of 1 887-88, the D'Ente, 

an unnamed variety of the D'Ente, the purest and 
largest tyi>e of the Prune D'Ente, or D'Agen, or Robe de 
Sergent (solely progagatel by grafting). 

APKICOT.S — Boulbon, Esperen, Dnclos, 
Mexico, the shipp'ng varieties of the south of France. 

Constantinople Quince— The largest, most pre- 
cocious and prolific of ail quinces. 

Ever-I>earing Blacic Mulberry of .Spain- 
Medlar. Sorhus (all those kinds should have a place in a'l 
gardens) , 

Mulberry Trees for .Silkworm Feeding. 
Sillcwurm Kggs. .Sericulture Cliart, 50 cts. 

45ff"3end for General Catalogue and Supplement with 
Chapters on "Nut-hearing Trees" and "Prunes," illus- 
trated with 20 walnut cuts, 5 prune cuts, and numerous 
other cuts representing Medlar, Sorbus, Black Mulberry, 
French Chestnuts, Filberts, etc. 



FELIX GILLET, 

Nevada City, Cal. 



Fine assortment of the leading varieties at the follow- 
ing reduced prices, to the trade: 

20O0 Apples .I to 10c. 9500 Pears 6 to 10c. 

0700 Apricots 4 to 8c. 7800 Cherries 6 to 10c. 

7700 Prunes. 4 to 8c. SO.M Peaches 4 to 8c. 

4600 Plums 4 to 8o. 1000 Japan Plums.e to 12c. 



ALAMEDA 
Cleveland, 



NURSERY. 

Alameda, Cal. 



100,000 Olive Cuttings for Sale. 

AI'PLV TO 

C. A. BANCROFT, San Dleso, Cal. 
Or to THE HISTORY CO., S. P. 



HEADQUARTERS 



-FOR- 



WHITE ADRIATIC FIGS. 

THE LARGEST STOCK OF TREES IN THE STATE. 

The Only Fig that Should be Planted for Drying. 

ALSO A LARGE STOCK OP OTHER TREES: 

Apples, Pears, Peaches, Plums, Prunes, Apricots, Cherries, Necta- 
rines, Olives, Oranges, Lemons, Shade Trees and Orna- 
mental Shrubs, Greenhouse Plants, Roses, Etc. 

■A. Ooxaa.j3l©to ..A.ssojctxn.oxx't of Hootod G-xta.I3os 

ALL TREES WARRANTED FREE FROM SCALE OR APHIS. 
^Catalogue Free. 



W. IVI. WILLIAMS, Fresno. Cal. 



TREES! TREES! TREES! 

BY THE DOZEN, 100, 1000, or 100,000. 

Our Stock this Season Cannot be Excelled on the Coast, 

Neither in ipiantity, ipialitv, varieties, size of trees, nor for health and vigor of same. We offer $1 each for every 
scale bug found on our nursery trees. 

OUR PRICES ARE VERY LOW THIS YEAR. 

Send for our new and beautiful lithograph-cover Tree and Seed Catalogue. See in it description o 

OUR NEW TRAGADA PRUNE, 

The very earliest, good shipping Plum. There are fortunes in It. Also our new and fancy 

JAPANESE ORANGES, CAMPHOR TREES, TEA PLANTS, 

And other novelties. Our Seed Store carries an immense stock of Seeds of every variety at bottom figures, both 
wholesale and retail. 

Send for Catalogue; It is the finest in the State—an ornament to any parlor table. See our Stock, ir fossiblk, 
or write to us. Address 

W. R. STRONG & CO., 



S A.Ort. IMTO . 



FRUIT TREES! } Established isas. { FRUIT TREES! 

THOS. MEHERIN, 

Agency of CALIFORNIA NURSERY CO., Niles, Alameda Co., Cal. 

We have now for sale at Lowest Market Rates the Largest, Best Selected and Healthiest Stock of 

Fruit Trees, Grape Vines, Olives, Small Fruits, Etc. 

Ever offered on o Pacific oast, including all the new varieties, all grown on new land at the above Nur- 
sery and free from scale and other pests. Samples of the trees always on hand. 

Soods ! Soods ! Soeds ! 

W« HAVB ALSO C0N8TASTLT ON HAND A LAROII AND FRKBH STOCK OK 

Grass, Clover, Vegetable, Flower, and Tree Seeds, 

And Ornamental Trees and Plants, Bulbs, Roses, Magnolias, Palms, etc., 
at liOWKST RATRg. New Catalogue fur 1SH7 mailed on application. 



P. O. Box 2059. 



THOS. MEHERIN, 516 Battery Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



Fancher Creek Nursery. 

VALUABLE AND NEW 

PEACHES, NECTARINES, APRICOTS. PRUNES. ALMONDS, FIGS, OLIVES, POME- 
GRANATES, MULBERRIES, 

Japan Fruits, Grapes, Texas Umbrella Trees, Roses, 
Oleanders, Hedge Plants & Ornamental Plants. 

ADRIATIC FIGS. NEW OLIVES & SABALKANSKY GRAPES 

Pamphlet on Fig Culture, 10 cents. New Catalogue, containing full descriptions and guide lor 
Amateur Rose-Growers, now ready. Address 

GUSTAV EISEN, Manager. .... FRESNO, CAL. 



■W lion AXXC3. laCo-vtr "to H«,i-v©st tlao Oi-ojo : 

Full Directions on the Growth and Culture of RAMIE Free on Application. 



FIELD, GARDEN, FLOWER AND TREE 



FRESH -A.lSrr> I?,E3LIABLE, -A.T IjO"WEST Il,.A.TES. 
JAPAN PERSIMMON SEED AND TREES. 

TRUMBULL & BEE3E, 419-421 Sansome St., SAN FRANCISCO. 



FItte Small Frnits a Specialty. 

CUTHBERT RASPBERRY. 




TJKST MARKET BRRKV KNOWN ! Lar^e, 

-U Firm and Luscious, staiuls travel lliiely, hears im- 
mensely, and has two crops a vcar; 75 cents per dozen; 
$;j per 100. Also Strawberries, Blackberries, Gooseber- 
ries, Currants, etc., of finest imported varieties. Prices 
on application. 

L. 0. McOANN. Santa Cruz, Cal. 



CYPRESS AND^GUM TREES. 

All fresh, hardy, stocky trees. Mouterev Cypress, 8 to 
12 Inches high, transplanted in box«s of 70 trees each, at 
ti per bo.v or S«25 per 1000; 12 to 15 inches, of 60 trees 
per box. at $4 per 100 or «35 per 1000. Seedlings, 3 to 4 
inches, at 85 per 1000. Blue Gums, 8 to 12 inches, of lOO 
per box, at «1.50 per 100 or «14 per 1000; 12 to 18, of 70 
per box, at 81.50, or i 'O per 1000; 18 to 24 inches, 60 per 
box, at «1. 75. or 830 per 1000. i^arge, straig at sacked or 
hulked Gums or Pines shipf>ed onlv a»ter the roots have 
sprouted through sacking. Blue, 4 to 6 feet, at ?15 per 
100; 6 to 8 feet at 820 per 100; 8 to 10 at 825 per 100. 
Red or Round Leafed Gums, 4 to 6 feet, at 820 per 100- 
6 to 8 feet at 825 per 100. Pines, 2 to 3 feet, at 820 per 
100. Acacias, 2 to 3 feet, of 30 trees per box. or 3 to 4 
feet of -20 trees per box, at 82 per box. Also fresh- 
gathered, strong-growing seeds -if the Monterey or 
Italian Cypress, Blue, Red or Iron Bark Gum or Acacia 
in variety at lowest rates. Postage .Stamps taken for 
orders not exceeding 82. No other than the best of 
stock will be sent from thU nursery, as we desire to 
make a friend of every cash customer. 

GEO. R. BAILEY, Park Nursery, 
Berkeley, Cal. 



C. M. SILVA & SON, 

NTTRSERYMEN, 

Lincoln, Cal., and Newcastle. Cal. 

CUOICK STOCK OF ALL KINDS OP 

FRUIT TREES, SMALL FRUIT, 
PLANTS, Etc. 

McDevitt Cling Peach, Walling Plum, Botan Japan 
Plum, Coosa Nectarine, Chestnuts, Pomegranates, Mul- 
berries, etc. Fay's Prolific Currant, Hansell and Souhe- 
gan Raspberries, Balmont Strawberry, etc. 
»"Send for Catalooue. Address 

O. M. SILVA & SON, 

Newcastle, Cal. 



B. V. CUTTINGS. 

I3oi-clc/vi-ix "\7"«,r-lotlo». 

I OFFER FOR SALE, AT $10 PER M., 
200.000 CUTTINGS of the f-llowing renowned 
varieties, tule-packed, F. O. B. at deiKit: Cabernet Sau- 
vignon, Cabernet-Franc, Merlot, Venlot, Malbec, Tintu- 
rier, Portal-Ploussard, Monilense, J>ctite Sirrah and 
Grosse Blue. Also from J^..^! to 85.00 per M. all other 
well-known wine and table grajio varieties, too numerous 
to mention. The above Grape Cuttings are from our 
vineyard, and we guarantee them true to name, healthy, 
in good condition, and i lTered at lowest market price. 
Ten (10%) per cent invariably in advance on small orders. 
Information turnished, if desired. Will not guarantee 
cuttings procured for accommndatiim from other vine- 
yards, but will always select them from resp<inslhle par- 
ties and in healthy locations. The Burgundy and Bor- 
deaux varieties are very scarce, and parties desiring to 
plant this winter would do well to secure their cuttings 
at once, and save money and disappointment. 

J. B. J. PORTAL. 
Box 627. San Jose, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 




You want 
rlilion, and 

AUi.K 

ulil:ihl|. to all 

inif^*..., in 'ill. ling 

, VINES, 
FRUITS. 

EST OLD. 

THE STORRS k HARRl^N CO. 



GAREY'S NURSERIES, 

Successors to the O. W. Childs Nurseries, 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

FOR SALE, SEASON 1886-87. 

The largest, best grown, best rooted, cleanest, healthiest 
stock of Fruit Trees in Southern California, all true to 
label, consisting, as specialties, of Olive, Orange, Lemon, 
Lime and Bartlett Pear. Price List free. Address 
THOS. A. GAREY, Agent, 
P. O. Box 452. Los Ansreles, Cal. 



DEL MONTE VINEYARD NURSERY, 

FRESNO, CAL. 

For Sale— White Adriatic Pig CuttlDga of 

my own importation Grape Kooik and (Sittings of 
Carignan, Mataro Grenaclie, Teinturier, Trousseau, 
Carbenet Sauvignon, Malbec and Muscat Frontigmm, etc, 
M. DENXCKB. 



15, 1887.] 



f ACIFie F^URAlo PRESS. 



59 




^ NEW 

Seeks 



FOK I 



a^Our New Catalogue for 1887, mailed free on appli- 
cation, contains description and price of Vegetable, 
Flower, Grass, Clover, Tree and Field Seeds; Au8tralian 
Tree and Shrub Seeds; native California Tree and Flower 
Seeds, Fruit Trees, and m^ny new novelties introduced 
in Europe and the United States. 

THOS. A. COX & CO., 
411, 413, 415 Sansome St., San Francisco. 



PACIFIC NURSERY, 

Lombard Street, between Baker and Lyon, 
San Francisco. 

20,000 OLIVES, PICHOLINE, 2-year old, $150 

to S200 per 1000. 
2000 OLIVES. MISSION, 2-year old. S35 per 100. 
lOu.OOO BLACKBERRIES, LAWSuN and 
i KITTITANY and others, 810 per 1000. 

Also a lar^re stock of Monterey Cypress, Monterey 
Pine, Blackwood Acacias, Peppertrees and other desirable 
Evergreen Fruit and Shade Trees. 

For the Gardens I offer Roses in the best and newest 
varieties. Pink, Camellias, Azaleas, Rhododendrons, 
Araucarias, Ciosmas, Laurustun and other varieties at 
low prices. P. LDDEMAN. 



FINE, FRESH AND CLEAN. 

I have for sale seed of Vita» Californica, proof 
a^rainst Phylloxera, which I will send at $1 per pound for 
5 pounds or more, or SI. .50 per pound for less than 5 
pounds. 

Vitas Californica Cuttings, $8 per 1000. 

^"Freight to be paid by purchasers. 

C. MOTTIER, 
P. O. Box 8. Middletown, Lake Co., Cal. 



NAPA VALLEY_NURSERIES. 

Leading Specialties for Season of 

CENTENNIAL CHERRY, 

MTJIR PEACH, 

LOVE-ALL PEACH. 

LEONARD COx'V'ES 

(Successor to Coaiks & Tool), 
P. 0. Box 2. Napa City, Cal, 



SAN LEANDRO NURSERY. 

FINE ASSORTMENT oi' tuk LEADING VARIETIES OF 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES. 

The Hardy White Tuscany, Hardy Yellow 
Tuscany, Clingstone Peaches. 

LARGEST PEACHES IN CALIFORNIA. Splendid 
flavor; good shippers; excellent for canning. 
Gum and Pepper Trees in boxes. Flowers and Shrubs. 
a^All trees grown on new, rich soil, without irriga- 
tion, and are positively free from insect pests. 

G TOSETTI, 
San Leandro, Alameda Co., Cal. 



1838. POMONA NURSERIES. 1886. 

A superb stock of Lavson best Early 
Market Pt-ar, KiefTer best Late Market 
Pear, Le Conte aud other Pear Trees. Wil- 
son, Jr., largest kuowu Blackberry; 163 
bu3hel« per acre- 4.|. inches arounrl. Ti^^rie, 
the largest very hardy Blackberry. Marl- 
boro and Golden (^ueen Raspberrien. Parry 
and Lida, best Market Strawberries. Ni- 
agara, Empire State and other Grapes in 
large supply. All the worthy old, and 
Uruits. Catalogue free. WM. PAKRlf. 
Harry, J. 




TREES AND PLANTS BY MAIL. 

MEECH S PROLIFIC QUINCE ; LAW- 
SON, KlhiFPE h, and LE CONTE PEARS; 
NIAGARA and EMPIRE STATE GRAPh- 
VlNES, SOUHEGAN and MaRl,BORO 
RASPBERHIBS. MAY KING and JEWELL 
STRAWBERRIES. A ComDlete Stock o( 
everything desirable to plant. Send immediatelv for 
price list and circulars. Address, WEST JERSEY 
NURSERY CO., Bridgeton, N. J. 



1,000,000 GRAPE CUTTINGS 

At $3 per M. 
Muscatel, Muscat, Sultana, Flame Tokay and Emperor 
also Rooted Vines at $12 per M. 

OAK SHADE FRUIT CO., 

Davisvllle. Yolo Co , Cal. 



s 



ibiey's Tested Seed 

Catalogup free on application. 
Send for it. 
HIRAM SIBLEY & CO., 

BocHESTEii, N. y. & cnicAoo, III. 



s 



FRENCH PRUNE TREES FOR SALE. 

For sile, about 2000 French Prune Trees. 2 years old, 
larg^e, healthy trees, free from insects, at i^d per 1000, or 
S5 per 100. Apply to B. SCHULTE, one-half mile west 
of Wayne (a local station 4 miles north of San Jose), or 
Address P. U. Box 132, San Jose, Cal. 



J. N. KNOWLES, Manager. EDWIN L. GRIFFITH, Secretary. 

AHOTIO oixj x^onits, 

MANnFACTtJRBRS OF 

Stsex'xxx A/V 3a.«-lo, XSlefsJa.AXi.-t axxc3. r"le»Jri Oils. 

WHALE OIL SOAP, 

STRONGEST MADE ON PACIFIC COAST. 
Especially adapted lor Vineyards and Fruit Orchards. OFFICE— 28 California St., San Francisco. 



-fSHINN'S NUR8ERIE84- 

We offer to the public our usual excellent and well-assorted stock of 

FRUIT, NUT & SHADE TREES, 

SHRUBS AND PLANTS. 

ALL OUR TREES ARB GUARANTEED FREE FROM SCALE, 
and are grown without irrigation on new laud (listaiit from old orchards. 

^^We would call especial attention to our "Bulletin" Smyrna Fig, imported by us 
direct from the Levant and now proved, in numerous instances of fruiting, to be the 

TRUE FIG OF COMMERCE. 

Send for Catalogue. 

SHINN & CO., Niles, Alameda Co., Cal. 



33d 
YEAR. 



18T0CKT0N NURSERY.! 

WHITE ADRIATIC, 



33d 
YEAR 



H. P. GREGORY & GO. 

SOLE AGENTS FOR 

WEBBER'S CELEBRATED 




IRRIGATING 



SAN PEDRO, SMYRNA, and ENDRICH FIGS. 

Praeparturiens, Macrocarpa, Mayette, and Chaherte Walnuts, Chestnuts, Persimmons, Mulberries, Olives, 
Oranges, Lemons, Pears, Apples, Peaches, Apricots, Cherries, etc. Plums and Prunes on Myrobolan Stock, Grape- 
vines, Ornamental Trees, Shrubs, Palms, Mat;nolias, Clematis, New Roses and Hothouse Plants. 

TRY THE PERSIAN MULBERRY. 

NO SCALE — I wish particularly to call the attention of Fruit-provvers to this fact. I liave repeatedly had 
my nursery examined by experts, and upon no occa-ion have they found any scale or any indication of scale. The 
nursery is isolated from orchards, both old and new, and as ( take every precaution in importing new varieties to 
get only clean stock, I feel perfectly warranted in guaranteeing every tree sold by me free from scale and cthei 
pests that are proving so disastrous to the fruit interests of the State. Send for Cataloode. 

E. C. CLOWES, Proprietor, Successor to W. B. WEST. 

Stockton, Cal., October 27, 1886. 

This is to certify that we the undersigned have this day thoroughly inspected the Stockton Nursery; that we 
found no Scale or indication of Scale, and that to the best of our knowledge and belief the Stockton Nursery is free 
of this dreaded pest. 

WTW. H. ROBINSON, Quarantine Guardian San Joaquin Fruit District. 
JOS. HALE, County Commissioner of Horticulture. 



\\ ^i^CCirnC ROSES 

OLEIJO,PLANTS 

AVY>> FRUITo" ORNAMENTAL TREES, GRAPE VINES 

A^'^THING IN THE NURSERY LINE, withnnt first w riting 
^forour valuable FREE r'atalogno, the I 21 LARGE GREENHOUSES 
BEST we ever issued, containing the Rarest New and | 33d YEAR. 700 ACRES 

Choicest Old. THE STORRS & HARR9SON CO. PAINESUILLE, OHIO. 



What Mr. Beyer says:,;; 



Please 
cept my 

Bt thanks for the Pplondid eccds received from your firm. 
It would be a rather lengthy list if I should name all, hut 
willsaythatamongetSSfirst, and 3 second premi'ims 
awarded me at our fairs in Northern Indiana and 
Srmtl^ern Michigan, 28 first premiums were for vege- 
tables raised from your seeds. ^Vllat firm can beat 
this? '* August Beyer, So. Bend, Ind. 

Seed of this quality I am now ready to sell to every one 
who tills a farm or plants a garden, sending them FREE my 
Vegetable and Flower Seed Catalogue, for lh87. Old customers 
need not write for it. I catalogue this season the native wild 
potato. JAS. J. H. GREGORY, Seed Grower, Marblehead, Mass- 



SEEDS ! SEEDS ! SEEDS ! 



I^OI- X886 «iicl XOOV. 



FRESH STOCK OP 



All of this year's growth, for sale at the GEO. F. SYLVESTER SEED WAREHOUSE, Nos. 316 and 
WASHINGTON STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. SAMUEL BRECK, PrODrletor. 



BURPEE'S 

Vfarm annual 

11887 



nt FREE TO ALL who write fo: 
ScniJ jultlrcss on postal for llif most complete 
CATALOtilE 



It is a Handsome Book of 128 pp., with hundreds 
of illustrations, 3 Colored Plates, and tells all about 

THE BEST 

GARDEN, 

Itl^^A ObbUOf PLANTS, 

TlioroHKbbred .Stock and Fnncv Pojiltry. It 

describes RAIiH NOVELTIES in Vosetablcsand 

Flowt-rs <>l real v.iliif. whirh riiiiiiut be ol>luiDi'<l eUewli 



A uoiorea I'lates, ana 

SEEDS, 



W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO.. Philadelphia. Pa. 



PEPPER'S NURSERIES. 

Established in 1858. 

Apricot, Plum, Prune and Peach on Myrobolan Plum 
tocks. Bartlett, Winter Nelis, B. ClairReau, B. Hardy 
and other varieties, 1 and 2 years. A full stock of 1 and 
2-year-old Apple Trees, Peach on Peach, Nectarine, 
Quince, Fig, Grape, Currants, Gooseberries, Almonds, 
Walnuts, Chestnuts, etc. Prices reasonably low. No 
scale bug. Also Myrobolan Plum and Pear Seedlings, 
home erown. Address W. H. PEPPER, Peialuma. Gal. 



G-TTAV.AS. 

Large stock; fine plants; for the season of 1886-87. 
Address 

T. J. SWAYNB, National City Of Sfo Piego. 



Home-.Grown RYE GRASS SEED. 

In Lots of Half a Ton, at 10 cents 
per pound. 

JOHN W. FERRIS, 

Black Point, Marin Co., Cal. 
SOW EAKLY. 30 lbs. to the acre. 



ORANGE 
CULTURE 



A practical treatise by T. A. Garkt 
^i\'iiig the results of long expcri 
ence in Southern California. 196 
pages, cloth bound. Sent post-paid 
at reduced price of 75 cts. per copy 
by DEWK:* & CO,, Publishers, S. f, 



We also carry ih stock thf Larqkst Line of 

MACHINERY 

In the UNITED STATES, 

Consistinc of Wood and Iron Workiner 
Machinery. Pumps of every 
description. 

ENGINES AND BOILERS 



A SPECIALTY. 



Sawing Made Easy. 

UONABCH LIQHINIITa SAWING SIACHINB 

SEisrr oisr 

TEST TRIAL. 




FoTloMlng camps, ■wood-yards, farmers getting ontt 
etSve w(5a, aSd all &s of lo8-cuttlng.-i t 'f 
3 to„»nd, .M wnrly. A boy of 16 '=an faw logs »«st and 
easy. Immense savrng of labor and moooy. wmo 
forele-'antlv illustrated cataloffue 1116 .brilliant colors, 
a°sobiiUiSly lUuminated poster in 6 colors. All tree. 

ftKentS Wanted. fiW vmncy m..rf« qwkly 

UONABOH MPS. CO., OAEPEHTEEVIIiE, ILL. 
THE MONA.RCH POTATO DIGGER for 
Sale by TRUMAN, ISHAM & HOOKER, 
Agents for the Pacific Coast, 421 to 427 
Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 




1,300 Engines now in use. 
40,000 hiorse Power now running. 
Sales 2,000 H. P. per montli. 

iySend for Illu-itrated Circular and Reference List. 

PARKE & LACY, 

Sole Agents for Pacific Coast & Territories 
21 and as Fremont St. San Francisco. 



OThe BUYERS' GUIOE K 
Issued Sept* and i>lar€lit 
eacit year. j8®" 313 pageB, 
8>^xU>^ lnclies,ivltli over 
3,500 illustrations — a 
whole Plctui'c Gallery. 
GIVES Wholesale Prices 
direct to con.iumrrs on all jjoods for 
pei-sonal or family use. Tells liow to 
order, and .gives exact cost of every- 
thing you use, cat, drink, wear, or 
have fun with. These INVALUABLE 
BOOKS contain Information gleaned 
from the markets of the world. Wo 
will maU a copy FRKE to any ad- 
dress upon reccijit of 10 cts. to defray 
expense of mailing. Let ns hear from 
you. Respectfully, 

MONTGOMERY WARD & CO 

237 Hi 229 Wabash Avenue, ChicaKo, 111 



Fpilit FnnrauinnQ The finest, heat and cheap, 
null Cliyi CtViliyb, est Photographs and En- 
PHOTOGKAPHS, ETC. gravings of Fruics, Vege- 
tahles. Houses, Farms, Landscapes, etc,, made by S. F, 
PBOTOOKAViNe Co., 669 Clay St., 8 F. 



60 



f ACIFie I^URAlo f RESS. 



[Jan. 15, 1887 



COMBINED HARVESTERS for 1887 



MANUFACTURED BY THE 



STOCKTON COMBINED HARVESTER AND AGRICULTURAL WORKS, 

PULL AND PUSH, 

BELT AND GEARED. 

HOUSER, 
MINGES, 



SHIPPEE, 

AND 

POWELL. ^ 




The "HOUSER" Belt 

IS OUR STANDARD. 

But will build Geared to Order 



-ALSO- 



Minges, Shippee and 
Powell. 



THE HOUSER COMBINED HEADER AND THRASHER 

IS THE BEST KNOWN AND MOST POPULAR HARVESTER ON THE COAST. 

It has had 7 years of unparalleled success in our grain fields. A Pull and Belt machine, combining Strength, 
Durability and Capacity, and as Light as consistent with strength. Every Houser 

Harvester sold has given entire satisfaction. 

Wc have not space to frivo a full description of the Houser Harvester, but append as many Testimonials of 1886 as room will permit, showin"- 
what the Houser has accomplished, and what our gfrain raisers think of them. Save this page, keep it for reference ; look for i.s.sue of Rural Pkess of 
January 29th, with a new cut of the Houser for 1887 and further Testimonials. 



ToLARE. Nov. 20, 1886. 
Stockton Combined Harvester and Agricult- 
ural Works — Gkntlemen : The 14-foot Houser 
Belt Harvester I purchased of you proved an 
entire siicees'i. I tested it 58 days on both heavy 
and light and down grain and on land contain- 
ing over 1500 large scattered trees to the sec- 
tion and several fair-sized sloughs. It cut and 
thrashed grain on uneven land where it could 
not be gathered with a header. I had no delay 
from breakages and my extras cost me not to 
exceed $20. I used 20 rather small animals, 
which improved in flesh while harvesting. I 
saved my sack biil and thrashing bill over the 
old method of harvesting. My machine is good 
for several seasons. Sixteen good-sized animals 
would have handled my harvester the entire 
eason and would require more only on sandy 
soil. Of 11 Houser machines purchased of you 
this season by parties I am personally acquaint- 
ed with, the purchasers were more than satis- 
fied. Yours respectfully, Fked Aknold. 

Arbuckle, Cal., Nov. 25, 1886. 
Stockton Combined Narventer and Aijricult- 
tired IVorks — Gentlkmkn: The Ti foot Houser 
Maohine purchased of you last summer gave 
good satisfaction. We cut 1000 acres; some of 
it was badly down and very heavy s raw, and 
our neighbors thought it could not be harvested 
with a combined machine. We put our wheat 
in the sack for about what it costs to cut with 
a header and put in the stack. We 
were 52 days in cutting, and think it the 
best combined harvester and labor-saving ma- 
chine in use. Yours respectfully, 

J. C. Brooks & Sons. 

TrLARK, Dec. 5, 1886. 
Stockton Combined Harvester and Agricult- 
ural Worki — Gentlemen! 1 used the 14 foot 
Houser Belt Harvester which I bought of you to 
out 1200 acres of very heavy wheat with long 
straw and badly lodged. I had 12,000 sacks of 
grain and averaged 200 sacks a day, or 20 acres. 
I could do better another year, as it was all new 
to me. It is by far the cheapest and best way 
to harvest grain. I made an estimate on each 
day's running expenses as follows, counting my 
time : Labor, S13.50; horse hire, §14; horse 
feed, .$10 ; board of men, S-S.TS ; oil, 20 cents ; 
expense keeping machine in repair, 50 cents; a 
total of §41.95 each day. My yield was 29,000 
bushels, costing me a trifle less than seven- 
eighths of a cent a bushel to put it in piles of 
from 250 to 400 sacks each. My estimate is 
the highest that could be made for 60 days' run 
in a very warm climate. Respectfully yours, 
G. H. Castle, Jr. 



N i.'^ALiA, Dec. 8, 1886. 
Stockton Combined Ilarveater and Af/ricult- 
ur<d Workx — ( tEntlkmen : The 16-foot Houser 
harvester we bought of you gave perfect satis- 
faction. We cut 1500 acres, employed four 
men and 21 horses; averaged on one section of 
standing Sonora gr.iiu acres a day; largest 
number of sicks, .'i56. Five hundred acres of 
my grain was heavy Australian and 20 acres 
very badly tangled. It did better work in 
lodged grain than any header could do. It cost 
us not more than 75 cents an acre to pile the 
sacks in the field, less than one-half of the old 
way. The cost of extras was comparatively 
small. We cheerfully recommend it to al' 
farmers. Yours respectfully, 

Harris & Couohran. 



Willows, Nov. 24, 1886. 
Stockton Combinid Harvester and A'jricnlt- 
ural Works — Gentlemen: The 14 foot Houser 
Machine I purchased of you did excellent work. 
1 am well pleased with it — can recommend it to 
all farmers. I averaged 26 acres a day — had 
'MO acres of very heavy grain which I saved 
better than if it had been headed and thrashed. 
I run niy machine 52 days, and with a few dol- 
lars expense, it will be as good an new. 

Yours truly, P. R. Garnett. 

Dixon, Nov. 30, 1886. 
Stockton Combined Harvester and Aijricult- 
ural irorfo— Gentlemen : 1 am well pleased 
with my 14 foot cut Houser machine. I cut 
600 acres in 30 days, including all stoppages. 
My best day's work was 450 sacks of wheat. I 
had some very heavy grain and some light, and 
also some that was lodged, but the harvester 
did good work. Yours truly, 

Chas. Hunt. 

Fresno, Dec. 22, 1886. 
Stockton Combined Harvester and Agricult- 
ural H'oris— Gentlemen: The 14 foot Houser 
machine we bought of you, gave entire satis- 
faction. We cut 1760 acres, some very heavy 
down grain aud very rough hog-wallow land, 
and it did just as good work as on level land. 
It cleaned better than the ordinary thrashing 
machines and separators. Our wheat was 
counted as No. 1 in the market. We cut the 
grain much cleaner than our neighbors who 
used headers. The worst objection to the 
Honser is that we can't sell our stubble 
fields to stockmen. We can willingly recom- 
mend the Houser Machine to any one wishing 
a combined harvester. Y'ours truly, 

Han.sen, McLauohlin & ^yke. 



Gravson, Nov. 24, 1886. 
Stockton Combined H arrester and Agricult- 
ural Works — Gentlemen: The 16 foot Houser 
Belt Machine I purchased of you this season 
gave entire satisfaction. I cut about 1500 
acres in 50 days and never used over 20 ani- 
mals, although the weather was very hot, and 
some of my barley yielded 50 bushels an acre. 
My expenses for extras for the season were 75 
cents. Yours respectfully, 

Chas. D. Elfers. 

Grayson, Nov. 27, lS8(i. 
Stockton Combined Harvester and Agricult- 
ural IKorjb— Gentlemen: The 16 foot Houser 
Belt Machine I purchased of you la>>t summer 
did excellent work. I cnt about 1400 acres, 
200 acres of which was very uneven land; used 
22 animals on hilly ground and 18 on level 
land. The machine thrashed well and saved 
the grain. The cost was hardly half what it 
would have been had I headed and stacked my 
Krain. The Houser is the machine for the 
farmer. Wishing you success in your great en- 
terprise, I am, very truly yours, 

M. Galvan. 

Tulare, Nov. 30, 1886. 
Stockton Combined Harvester and Agricult- 
ural Works — liKNTLKMEN: In regard to the 
14-foot Houser Belt Harvester which I bought 
of you, I am well satisfied. We cut 1800 
acres of grain, some standing and some of it 
lodged very badly; it both saves the grain well 
and cleans it good, and so far as I can see, it is 
as good as I want. Yours respectfully, 

J. T. Chism. 

Crow's Landing, Dec. 4, 1886. 
Stockton Combined Harvester and Agricult- 
ural Works — Gkntle.men: I cut 1200 acres 
with the 16-foot Houser Belt Machine, averaging 
about 30 acres a day in heavy wheat and 
thrashed about 400 sacks a day without any ex- 
pense for repairs. I run 4 men and 22 horses, 
and consider it a fine machine. I can harvest 
grain for one-half what it used to cost to head 
and thrash. Y'ours truly, J. B. Crow. 

Chamberlain Ranch P. 0.. Merced, "1 
Nov. 20, 1886. / 
Stockton Combined Harvester and A-gricnlt- 
ural Works — Gentlemen: I cut this season 
with your Houser Belt Harvester 1700 acres of 
grain, averaging 25 acres a day, including stop- 
ages, 1400 acres barley, and .300 wheat. For a 
combined m&chiue and work intended, it can- 
not be beat in the field. Y'ours truly, 

A. VV. Chamberlain. 



Modesto, Nov. 27, 1886. 

Stockton Combined Harvester and Agricult- 
ural M'orfc*— Gentle.men: The 16-foot Houser 
Harvester which we bought of you last har- 
vest, give us entire satisfaction. We cut 
about 1600 acres of grain with it, and averaged 
about .30 acres a day, with four men and 22 
animals, and with great ease. We had but lit- 
tle delay during the harvest season, and the ex- 
pense will be very little to put it in repair 
for the coming harvest. From my experience 
and observation I think the Houser Machine 
has given more general satisfaction than any 
combined machine in the field. 

Y'ours respectfully, M. Moyle & Son. 

McMahon Ranch, Dixon, Nov. 30, 1886. 
Stockton Combined Harvester and Agricult- 
vrcd Works — Dear Sirs: We harvested about 
l.SOO acres in 45 days with the two 14-foot cut 
Houser Harvesters purchased of you this past 
season, at an expense of 60 cents per acre for 
labor hire for four men for each machine. The 
grain all stood up and had about average grain. 
Used 24 animals to each machine, which run 
them with ease. Twenty good mules can run 
them. Yours respectfully, 

J. B. Yount, 

Mr-s. L. E. McMahon, 

J. E. McMahon. 

Madison, Nov. .30, 1886. 
Stockton Combined Harvester and Agricult- 
ural ll'oris— Gentlemen: I sold your IS foot 
Houser Harvester to Messrs. Adams & Camp- 
bell; they are so well pleased with it they say 
they would not take the money back for it if 
they could not get another Houser. They 
employed three men and 24 horses; run 50 days 
with an average of 30 acres per day — but think 
they can do better next year, as they know now 
how to run and manage it in good shape. They 
harvested a good deal of grain which gave good 
returns that could not have been cut with a 
header to any advantage. Yours truly. 

W. Levy. 

WiLLOw.s, Nov. 21, 1886. 
Stockton Combined Harvester and Agricult- 
ural Works — Gentlemen: I am pleased to in- 
form you that the 14-foot Houser Belt Ma- 
chine purchased of you this season, has given 
me entire satisfaction. It did all claimed for 
it; had a run of 51 A days and did not lose an 
hour during that time, making an average of 
27A acres per day. Would not do without the 
Houser Machine at any cost, and cheerfully 
recommend it to all farmers. Y'ours, etc., 
Wm. Killebrew. 



ss-WE GUARANTEE OUR HARVESTERS TO DO GOOD WORK WITH PROPER MANAGEMENT. 

Please call at our Works, corner Main and East .streets, Stockton, examine our Harvesters, read cur Testimonials, see or correspond with those who 
have used our machines. It is to the interest of all grain growers to inspect our HARVESTERS for 1887 before purchasing Harvesting Machinery. Give 
us your orders soon, that we may till them for the early harvest. There is no danger of breaking the frame, gearing or shafting, as we build them so 
strong in every respect that they cannot be broken with fair usage. They effectually stood the severe strain of field work last season, harvested more 
grain, at less expense, and cleaned it better than any other Combined Harvesting Machines of any description. 

g^Send for Circulars. Correspondence solicited. For further information, prices, etc., address 

STOCKTON COMBINED HARVESTER AND AGRICULTURAL WORKS, STOCKTON, SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, 



Vol. XXXIII.— No. 4.1 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 22, 1887. 



J $3 a Year, in Advance 

( Single Copies, 10 Cis. 



The Mohair Industry. 

In the Pacific Rural Peess of last week 
there was a communication on the mohair mar- 
ket, from a leading firm of wool and mohair 
dealers in New York City, in which the follow- 
ing sentence occurred: 

For choice fine. 36 cents is full value to-day. 
Good average combing will bring only 34 cents, and 
fair average will not command more than 30 cents. 
Carding stock is slow sale, from 15 up to 25 cents 
for very clean, bright lots. 

We have a letter from a prominent mohair 
producer calling our attention especially to this 
statement as indicating that the mohair indus- 
try is in imperative need of protec- 
tion by the Government, because the 
prices named above would only net 
the producer about 28c per pound 
for the choicest mohair and of course 
proportionately less for other gradts. 
We are assured that mohair cannot 
be produced in America for any such 
price. 

It appears, from the circular cited 
above, that manufacturers in America 
went abroad for their supplies of mo- 
hair where the prices ruled very low, 
and, to use the exact words of the cir- 
cular, • " cared nothing for an Ameri- 
can industry in which they claimed 
to have a great interest." Generally 
we are in favor of only a very mod- 
erate tariff, but this and some other 
California products are exceptional. 
In the case of mohair there is no one 
breeding goats at present for their 
fleece who has not secured the very 
best stock be could find, and often at 
a heavy outlay of both time and mon- 
ey, and yet is unable to compete 
with foreign production. One goat- 
breeder writes as follows: "I used 
to get 55 cants a pound for my fleece. 
Now that I have a superior staple I 
get only 28 cents net." He adds: 
"I am truly discouraged." It is no 
wonder, for it has taken him 10 years 
to produce his improved mohair. 
Another breeder says he is going to 
butcher off his stock and quit the business. 
Ydt another says: " I am wholly dissatisfied 
with the price I received for my clip of mohair 
of 1886." 

One woald suppose that those who entered on 
the production of mohair have had a hard time 
enough, and that they are entitled to such tariff' 
protection now as will save them from impending 
ruin. They have labored long and patiently 
through times of depression and neglect to main- 
tain their enterprises, and now that the market 
seemed disposed to improve because of new uses 
being found for the mohair, in comes the foreign 
article and seems inclined to knock the bottom 
out of our promising home product. This in- 
dustry clearly needs the attention of the law- 
makers, and needs protection until it is brought 
upon a broader basis at least. The goat indus- 
try promises to make productive vast areas on 
the Pacific Coast and in the Southern States 
and Territories which are ill adapted for any- 
thing else. We have counted upon fleece goats 
to people many of our waste places and to fur- 
nish home-grown material for vast mohair- 
manufacturing enterprises. It will not be wise 
to deny it the support it needs just at this 
janctnre, and it seems ^9 though it could not 



be withheld. We respectfully call the at- 
tention of our Pacific Coast Senators and Rep- 
resentatives to the matter. 



Moming-Glory. 

Editors Press: — I have a large vineyard planted 
last fall. In it I find about one acre of morning- 
glory. I wish to kill it, and prefer to 
kill land with it sooner than leave the weed 
to spread to the rest of the vineyard. Can 
you suggest any remedy ? Digging it out root by 
root, the only remedy I know of being too expensive. 
— Morning-Gloky. 

We despair of a cheap or easy remedy. 
Whenever we have printed experience of some 



not cost too much, she said it would not cost as 
much as the ranch was worth, and if the morn- 
ing-glory is left alone it will take the ranch. 

Morning-glory is a subject which could well 
have some space in almost every issue of the 
Rural. Will not all readers who have even a 
ray of light upon its destruction give others 
the benefit of it ? 



Department of Agriculture and Labor. 

It was announced by telegraph the other day 
that one of the Houses of Congress had passed 
a bill organizing a "department of agriculture 




SCENE ON A SUGAR PLANTATION IN LOUISIANA. 



subscriber looking to such an end, we have al 
ways had other statements that the method had 
failed. Even covering the land with salt, as 
has been done at Hiywards, where salt is 
cheaply obtained from the Bay Shore Salt 
Works, has only succeeded in discouraging the 
plant temporarily. Even digging it out by the 
root, expensive as it is, has never been done 
thoroughly enough, we believe, to exterminate 
the plant. The only successful treatment we 
have heard of is that adopted by one of our 
energetic lady horticulturists, and that 
she has persisted in, if we remember correctly, 
for over two years and now believes the problem 
is near solution. She started on the theory that 
the plant must never be allowed to come 
to light or sight. She instructs one man 
to cultivate the infested spot every Monday 
morning with a sharp tooth cultivator. That is 
his work to do whether he can see a sign of the 
plant on the surface or not. It is understood 
that if the owner sees a sign of growth on the 
spot the man loses his place. By this method 
the extension of the plant has been checked and 
she hopes to annihilate it. She counts the pre- 
vention of extension as a great point, and when 
we asked her if such persistent cultivation would 



and labor." As described by mail advices, the 
bill provides that there shall be at the seat of 
Government an executive department, to be 
known as the Department of Agriculture and 
Labor, under the control of the Sscretary of 
Agriculture and Libor and Assistant Secretary. 
There shall be in the Department of Agricult- 
ure and Labor a division which shall be under 
the charge of the Commissioner of Labor, who 
shall hold his office four years, and until his suc- 
cessor be appointed, unless sooner removed, and 
shall receive $5000 a year. The commissioner 
shall collect information upon the subject of 
labor, its relation to cipital, hours of labor, 
rates of wages, cost of production, of articles 
produced, earnings of laboring men and women, 
the means of providing for their material, so- 
cial, intellectual and moral prosperity, and the 
best means to protect life ani prevent acci- 
dents in mines, workshops, factories aud other 
places of industry. The secretary is empowered 
to inquire into the cause of the discontent 
which may exist between the employers and 
employe! within the United States, and he may 
invite and hear sworn statements from both 
such parties concerning the matters in contro- 
versy. 



A Sugar Plantation. 

Our engraving gives a view of a sugar plan- 
tation in Louisiana. In the background are 
the plantation buildings, the most imposing of 
which is the sugar-house, with its tall chim- 
neys. Stretching quite across the middle 
ground are the wide fields of growing cane, 
growing thriftily upon the rich soil abundantly 
supplied with water from the bayous. In the 
foreground are the native trees, festooned with 
the graceful streamers of moss, which are char- 
acteristic of the warm, moist situation. The 
whole makes a landscape combining natural and' 
industrial features peculiar to the re 
gion in a pleasing manner. 

The scene is, of course, in the low- 
lands of Louisiana. On these rich al- 
luvial deposits, the chief productions 
are cotton and sugar, and rice and 
forage for the animals used on the 
plantations; and here are to be found 
the grandest agricultural establish- 
ments of the State, great capital be- 
ing employed in their operation. The 
farmers in the uplands, prairie and 
pine-woods, take advantage of the 
native pastures, nuts, fruits and 
roots, and raise cattle, sheep, hogs, 
and a few horses and mules, in addi- 
tion to field crops. Corn and sugar- 
cane are cultivated only with the 
plow or cultivator, in rows from four 
to seven feet apart. They should be 
plowed three times, although good 
corn is made by once plowing out in 
rich land. Corn is planted from Feb- 
ruary 14th to March 1st, sugar-cane 
either in the fall or spring; cane re- 
quires only one planting in three 
years; cotton is also planted in rows, 
from March 20th to May Ist; cotton 
is thinned to a stand by one hoeing, 
and plowed about three times. It is 
claimed that the lands of Louisiana 
will yield from 25 to 50 bushels of 
corn, from one to two bales of cotton, 
and from one to three hogsheads of 
sugar per acre. Rice is extensively 
cultivated, and will yield, it is said, from 30 to 
75 bushels per acre, worth from |45 to $115. 
In the lowlands rice is sown broadcast and ir- 
rigated; in the highlands it is drilled in rows 
two or three feet apart, and cultivated with 
a plow or cultivator. It is sometimes cut by 
machinery and thrashed like wheat, and is har- 
vested in August. Oats do well all over the 
State. Wheat is confined to Northwestern 
Louisiana. Sugar-cane is very easily grown, 
but the cost of the machinery is great, and it 
requires a large capital to build and operate a 
mill. Small farmers sell their cane to central 
mills for $i or $5 per ton (2000 pounds); 20 
tons is a fair crop per acre, but 30 tons and over 
are sometimes made. Sugar-making com- 
mences about the middle of October and con- 
tinues about three months. Cotton-picking com- 
mences in August and lasts till January. A quick 
hand will, it is said, pick more than 200 pounds 
per day. The scenery of Louisiana is by far 
the most varied and attractive in the South, es- 
pecially up and down its bayous and rivers 
— indeed, the whole country, from the Missis- 
sippi river to the Sabine, seems more like an 
immense garden, dotted here and there with 
pretty homes, than anything else. 



62 



pACIFie [^URAb PRESS. 



QORRESPOJMDENCE. 



Correspondents are alone responsible tor their opinions. 



An Old Californian in Florida. 

Editors Press:— I have been in Florida some 
five weekp, and traveled over much of the 
orange and vegetable portions of the State, and 
J see many things of interest. 

The orange crop is much better than was ex- 
pected after their severe freeze of last winter. 
There is a large per cent of rusty oranges, 
which are designated in many places as " Bronze 
and Rusests." They mark on their boxes, 
"Bright," "Bronze," and "Russets." The 
bright is very pretty fruit; the bronze is just a 
shade off— just a little cloudy; the russets are 
dark, many of tbem quite ao, but they are quite 
sweet and the growers claim they will keep 
longer than the bright ones. 

From the large groves about Orange lake, 
they claim to have shipped about two-thirds of 
the crop. The same will hold good from most 
of the hamrhock groves, as far as 1 can get infor- 
mation; but from the pine- land groves the ship- 
ments have been comparatively light. I was in 
a grove to-day of 100 acres and they have not 
shipped any. They commenced to pick to-day. 
I saw the owner of a 75 acre grove and he said 
he would not ^'ather any before the 20th of this 
month. I should think there is half the crop 
to go forward yet, most of which will be 
shipped in the next six weeks. If the California 
crop is keeping well, it appears to me it would 
be good policy to hold it back, at least to the 
middle of February or the first of March. 

There will be a good many vegetables and 
strawberries ready to ship in the next few 
weeks (as they have string beans and tomatoes 
now in many places); but shipments will be 
light to what they have been, unless they get 
quicker time and lower rates of freight on the 
railroads, as the returns for the past two years 
have not been satisfactory, owing to their 
berries and vegetables going into the markets 
in bad order. 

The thermometer has stood from 80° to -82° 
the past two days, but most of the time since I 
arrived in the State the weather has been de- 
lightful — from !iO'^ to (iO^ in the day and about 
40° at ni^ht. There were a few mornings that 
32° to 29° was reached ; it only being that low 
for a short time, but little damage was done. 

Were I planting a grove in Florida, I would 
use some grafts or buds of California's choice 
varieties; and were I planting a grove in Cali- 
fornia, I should certainly use some of Florida's 
productions — prominent among them the Tan- 
gerines. They are much superior to the Man- 
darins, which appears to be the variety mostly 
used in California. They have both here, but 
there is a marked difference. The grape fruit 
is another of the citrus family that is coming 
into favor. 

The possibilities of this State are very great, 
and the amount of oranges raised in the next 
ten years, at the rate of increase they have 
made the past five years, will be very great — 
perhaps a hundred times more than has ever 
been picked so far. I have seen trees, said to 
be live years from the graft, from which 8 boxes 
were picked last year, and they will pick 12 
boxes this year. It is astonishing with what 
rapidity they grow, especially in the hammock 
lands. There are tens of thousands of the sour 
trees, of large size, grafted and left standing in 
the woods, and in place of bearing the sour or- 
ange they now bear a beautiful sweet fruit, 
with but little cost of any kind. About the 
only expense is deadening a portion of the for- 
est trees, oak, magnolia, and other varieties, 
and after a time cutting them out with care, 
so as to not damage the orange trees. Many 
prefer to leave a portion of the forest trees. 

The freeze of last year was quite disastrous 
to the lemon, and there are but very few of 
them in the State. Some are going to plant 
lemons largely, but it will be some time before 
the masses will take hold of the lemon. 

There are many new industries springing up. 
The peach and Le Conte pear are being plant- 
ed largely in some sections, and the straw- 
berry will be canned extensively. It is said 
to bear very heavily for four months, and as no 
irrrigation and but very little cultivation is 
necessary, they can be raised very cheap. 

There is a great difference in the Florida of to- 
day and of 10 years ago; and Florida 10 years 
hence will astonish those who have thought it a 
swamp or sandbank. 

I expect to be in Chicago by the 20th of 
January, where, no doubt, I would like some 
of the beautiful weather I have been enjoying 
here. It is quite amusing tu hear the people 
from the North as they come into the country 
(and the number is great) express themselves. 
I tell them they will have to excuse me from 
gushing, for have lived in a country for .'57 
years, portions of which enjoy for 300 days out 
of the 365 as fine weather as any one week 
they can select, and the land is much richer, 
and all the products that can be grown success- 
fully in this State can be raised there (Cali- 
fornia), and many things that can't be raised 
in Florida. At the same time I admit they 
have a great State, and I think the next best 
one, take it all in all, to California. It is sur- 
prising to see the money being spent in rail- 
roads and indeed all kinds of improvements. 

Sanford, Fla., Jan. 1. J, M, JIlx.sos, 



[Jan. 22, 1887 



Information About Reclaimed Lands. 

Editors Press: — Could yon or any of your 
experienced readers give me some reliable in- 
formation on the following questions? 

1. Is the reclaimed soil of the Sacramento val- 
ley (original tule land) suitable for growing rhu- 
barb, canteloupes, squash, grapes, red currants, 
strawberries and other beriies; and which vege- 
tables do best on that soil (always provided one 
can irrigate whenever required and is no more 
subject to overflow) ? 

2. What quantity of such land is required 
to raise sufficient food (alfalfa or something 
else) for every cow kept for milking or dairy 
purposes (per annum) ? 

3. How many acres, set out in fruit trees, 
with some of the above-mentioned products 
raised between the trees, when they are young, 
can one work with one horse (distance from 
landing, two to three miles): and if one should 
require one horse for say 10 acres, how many 
horses should one be required to keep for i)0 or 
100 acres (I understand the proportion of horses 
required is comparatively less for larger 
quantities of land) ? 

While every year more land is being re- 
claimed, I have no doubt that reliable informa- 
tion on the above subjects will interest many of 
your readers beside myself. J. P. Kocii. 

San Jose. 

[No doubt our readers have much informa- 
tion on these and similar points. We should 
like to have a general contribution of experi- 
ence on the subject of reclaimed lands. We 
have heard but little about them of late.— Eus. 

PRE.S.S.] 

Explosion Extraordinary. 

Editors Press:— A few evenings since, 
as I was seated near the stove — for the 
evenings were a little cool— my eyes rested 
on the lamp chimney. " It is wonder- 
ful," said I to myself, " how long that 
chimney has lasted; it has been in the house a 
number of years, and in daily, or rather nightly, 
use for between two and three years, and only 
an ordinary chimney at that." Now I am not 
so superstitious as to connect these chance, 
though rather unusual, thoughts with subse- 
quent events; neither shall I affirm that there 
was no connection ; I merely state facts. The 
next evening, seated as before, the doors and 
windows all closed as usual, no appreciable 
change had occurred in the weather for some 
days previous — one of my sons, seated reading 
by the lamp, which had been lighted about half 
an hour, and turned up but just sufficient to 
read comfortably, his face partly away, so the 
lamp did not receive his breath, my eyes again 
rested on the lamp chimney, when suddenly, 
and with no word of warning, with a report 
nearly as loud as that of a revolver, the chim- 
ney lay scattered over the table in more than 
150 pieces, or, counting the small particles, 
more than 1000. 8. P. Snow. 

Santa Barbara, Dec. 23th. 



Driving Bees. 

Editors Press:— This is a term applied to 
the operation of compelling a colony or 
part of a colony of bees to leave their old 
hive. With hives having movable frames 
and straight combs in these frames, no driv- 
ing is necessary, as each comb can be lifted 
out separately, and with the adhering bees 
transferred to another hive, or the bees shaken 
off and the comb returned to its old place. But 
when it becomes necessary or desirable to trans- 
fer or divide the bees in a box-hive or a frame- 
hive, having irregular and crooked combs, 
driving must be resorted to. For this purpose 
it is necessary to procure a 

Driving-Box, 

Which is simply a box of the same lateral di- 
mensions as the hive, to be operated upon. If 
the hive is open at the top, it may remain as it 
stands; but if closed at the top, it must be 
turned upside down. The driving-box, which 
may have a few cross-sticks fastened inside for 
the support of the bees, is now placed, bottom 
up, over the open end of the hive, and a sheet 
or long strip of cloth wrapped round the joint, 
to prevent the escape of the bees. When all is 
secure, rap smartly on the sides of the hive 
with a stick or some tool, but not hard enough 
to loosen the combs, which may be fastened 
to the inside. Also give the bees a few 
puffs of smoke through the entrance 
or through a hole in the side of the hive. If 
there is no hole, one may be bored with an inch 
bit, and closed with a plug as soon as the smoke 
has entered. The smoke and rapping will 
frighten the bees and cause them to fill them- 
selves with honey, whereupon they will ascend 
into the driving-box and cluster there. Re- 
peat the rapping at brief intervals for about ten 
minutes, at the end of which time most of the 
bees will have left the old hive. The cloth 
should now be taken off, the driving-box c^ire- 



fully removed, and the bees disposed of, as de- 
sired. If the driving is done for the purpose of 

Dividing the Colony, 
The driving-box may be simply laid on its side 
in front of and with the open end facing a new 
hive, placed on the old stand, and a small piece 
of board placed so as to reach from the box to 
the entrance of the hive, upon which board the 
bees will soon travel into their new home. 
Sufficient bees must, of course, be left in the 
old hive to take care of the brood and to raise 
a new queen. The old hive should be removed 
to another stand at some distance. If the driv- 
ing is done for the purpose of 

Transferring. 
The operator should proceed, as described in 
my article on "modern transferring." If, 
however, there is but little brood in the old 
hive, I have found it more expeditious to make 
one job of it, by making a thorough drive of 
the bees, breaking up the old hive immediately, 
transferring such combs as contain worker- 
brood, and which are straight and large enough 
to fill a frame in the new hive, and sacrificing 
the balance of the brood. As in this case the 
whole force of the colony are working together, 
they will in a very short time have more brood 
and in better shape than that which was lost at 
the time of transferring. 

Wm. MCTH-RASMrSSEN. 

Independence, Cal. 



The Making of Vineyards Upon Re- 
sistant Stocks. 

Editors Pre.ss :— From the very numerous 
inquiries which have been made of me within 
the past few weeks for cuttings of the wild 
riparia vine, I judge that there is a greater dis- 
position than has heretofore existed to adopt 
this remedy against the continued spread or in- 
crease of the phylloxera, and I am thereby in- 
duced to put on paper a few ideas upon the 
general subject of making vineyards upon re- 
sistant stocks, which I think may be of ad- 
vantage to those contemplating the use of such 
stocks. 

Allow me to premise by saying that I have 
already given away all the riparia cuttings of 
last year's growth thai I had to spare. A great 
drawback to a more extensive use of resistant 
stocks heretofore has been the difficulty and de- 
lay in obtaining " a stand " in the vineyard. 
If a vineyard be planted with cuttings in the 
usual way of one cutting to the hill, my experi- 
ence is that, with the most favorable of seasons 
and the best of care, a growth of 60 per cent 
of the cuttings is all that can be reasonably ex- 
pected. The 40 per cent missing is to be re- 
placed the second year with cuttings or roots, 
and the third and fourth years there is still 
other planting to be done before a " stand " is 
had. 

Then, when the vines are grafted, if a success 
of 80 per cent is obtained, the owner is to be 
congratulated. Of the missing 20 per cent 
about one-fourth of the roots are unfit to be 
regrafted, and must, or ought to, be replanted, 
and it would be profitable to the owner to dig 
up and replant even a much larger portion of 
the roots that had failed to take the graft. It 
is thus seen that by this process several years 
pass before a " stand " is obtainable, and in 
the meantime all the land requires the same 
amount of labor and expense as if a perfect 
stand existed. In addition to these difii- 
culties, it will at once be suggested to the 
experienced man that with every year after the 
second the difficulty of getting replants (of even 
roots) to grow is greatly increased, the neigh- 
boring growing vines sending out their rootlets 
to occupy the space allotted to the replant. 

The sight of a resistant vineyard thus in the 
process of being made is of itself quite sutlicient 
to discourage any but the most persistent own- 
er, and nothing but the absolute certainty that 
resistant stocks afford the only remedy against 
the phylloxera could induce any man who had 
seen such a vineyard, during the years of 
struggle to obtain a stand, to adopt those stocks 
as the base of his vineyard. 

I have described the troubles and difficulties 
just as I have experienced them, and as I have 
observed them in other vineyards made by gen- 
tlemen of large experience in the business. I 
think I have ascertained and demonstrated that 
there is no necessity for the existence of these 
troubles and difficulties, and that there is no 
reacon why as perfect a stand should not be ob- 
tained by the use of resistant stocks, and with- 
in the same time, as can be bad by the use of* 
vinifera stock. 

When the first resistant vineyards were 
started in California, it was erroneously sup- 
posed that nothing would be gained by grafting 
the roots until they were at least three years 
old. Until they were of that age it was claim- 
ed that, when split for the insertion of the 
graft, they would not have sufficient strength to 
clasp and hold the graft in place. This may 
be true, but the error consisted in assuming 
that the wedge system of grafting was the only 
proper way of grafting the roots. When Mr. 
Leonard Coates, of Napa, grafted my first plant- 
ing of resistant stocks several years since, he 
adopted the system of (what I believe is known 
as) the " JSnglLsh pleft graft," and which re- 



quires that the graft after insertion shall be 
tied to the root. This system proving to be 
more successful than any wedge grafting that I 
had seen, suggested to mo that it was unneces- 
sary to allow the roots to grow long enough to 
give the spKt root strength to hold in place a 
wedge graft. This past year I tried the ex- 
periment of grafting in the vineyard upon roots 
respectively three, two and one year old from 
the cutting, and, as I anticipated would be the 
case, I had as full a measure of successful grafts 
upon the one-year-old roots as upon either the 
three or two-year-old ones. This experiment 
was not confined to a few vines, but extended 
to the hundreds and even thousands. I 
accept it, therefore, as a demonstration 
that one-year-old roots (from the cutting) can 
be as readily and successfully grafted as can be 
either two or three-year-old roots. And, if I 
am correct in this, the trouble and difficulty of 
making a resistant vineyard, with .is perfect a 
stand and in the same time that a vineyard 
could be made with vinifera stock, disappears. 
It shows that renislant cuttings planted in 
nursery ran be grafted the next spring after 
they are planted and trnnsplanted into the vine- 
yard the spring after they were grafted and at 
two years old from the l utting. I have abun- 
dantly tested the fact that riparia roots two 
years old can be transplanted with an almost 
inappreciable loss. 

My vineyard is all planted, so that I shall 
be compelled to graft in vineyard, but I shall 
this spring, at the same time of grafting in the 
vineyard, graft about 25 per cent of each of the 
varieties grafted in vineyard upon one-year-old 
roots )H nursery for stock with which to replant 
all missing vines and failures of grafts in the 
vineyard, and by this means I am confident that 
the annoyance, trouble and disgust attendant 
upon an irregular stand, and the conse(|uent de- 
lay in getting the vineyard in full, even bear- 
ing, will be avoided. 

I am so fully persuaded that the proper and 
economical plan of making a resistant vineyard 
is to graft upon one-year-old roots, that if I 
were making a new vineyard, I would graft all 
the roots in nursery, and only plant in vineyard 
roots already grafted. 

It may be well to state another very impor- 
tant advantage of grafting upon one-year-old 
roots. Every one who has attempted to make 
a vineyard upon riparia roots must have been 
impressed with the care and expense attendant 
upon suckering the vines the first year. A 
three-year-old riparia root, the first year of its 
being grafted, will throw up a great number of 
suckers. Unless these are removed, they will 
divert the sap from the graft and cause a large 
percentage of failures of the graft to take. I t 
is no small job to remove these suckers; they 
have to be removed with great care, in order to 
prevent the disturbance of the scion, and for 
the first season after the grafts are inserted they 
should be removed as fast as they show them- 
selves above the ground, which will \!k once 
every week or 10 days. This makes it very ex- 
pensive work. My experience is, that one- 
year-old roots, grafted, throw up only about 
one-tenth the number of suckers that are pro- 
duced by three-year-old roots, thus reducing 
the expense of suckering to less than one-fourth 
than is attendant upon suckering three-year-old 
roots. One-year-old roots seem to afford only 
about that quantity of sap which is necessary 
to the growth of the scion, while that afforded 
by the three- year old roots is so much more 
than is required by the scion that it finds an 
outlet in the production of suckers. I trust 
that the i<leas which I have thus hastily 
penned may be of benefit to others. 

John A. Stanly. 
• San Francisco, Jan. ISth. , 



A Fresno Raisin Vineyard. 

Editors Tress: — On Cherry avenue, in Cen- 
tral Colony, about five miles south of Fresno 
city. Miss C. M. Artz is engaged in the raisin 
vineyard business, and just as the picking and 
drying season was going out, we called at her 
establishment, and found her busily engaged in 
finishing up her last dryings, and gleaned from 
her the following notes: 

Her varieties consist of the Muscat and Seed- 
less Sultana. The Muscat is so far considered 
the finest and most profitable. In answer to a 
question as to the prospect for the future of the 
Sultana, she said: " As to the -Sultana, we don't 
yet know what we may or may not do. The 
Sultaina is fast coming to the front. The Mus- 
cat has the advantage of ripening earlier." 
This season she commenced picking the first 
crop of Muscat Auuust 24th. The Sultana is 
not fully ripe till about a month later. The 
Muscat has also a great advantage over the Sul- 
tana in the matter of its much larger size. 

Miss Artz has only eight acres in vineyard. 
Of varieties she has 1500 Sultanas, 103!) Mus- 
cats and 60 Cornichons. T^is last mentioned is 
one of the finest table grapes, being large, shape- 
ly, of beautiful color — a very dark purple — and 
of the finest flavor. 

In the past season she had the extra expense 
of furnishing redwood stakes for the Sultanas 
and Cornichons, which cost .?.32 per thousand; 
the labor for staking and tying up, $10 for the 
whole. The cost of plowing or cultivating 
three times and hoeing twice was S26. Add to 
all this the interest on money invested and the 
taxes, and we have a summary of her expenses 
for 1886. 

It is believed that the produftiog b»8, for tb^ 



f ACIFie I^URAb PRESS. 



Jan. 22, 1887.] 



year, been about IJ tons per acre. The Sul- 
tana shrinks in drying about 4 pounds to 1; 
the Muscat about 3 to 1. The Sultanas were 
not yet sold, but it was believed there would 
be between 5 and 6 tons after drying. The 
grapes from several Sultana vines, when fresh 
picked, were weighed, and the average was set 
down at .35 pounds per vine. The yield from 
one vine, not wholly exceptional, was I'lh 
pounds. 

Miss A. thought it would be quite safe to es- 
timate the production of four tons raisins from 
her 10.39 Muscat vines. The entire crop of 
Muscats was sold in the sweat-box to parties in 
San Francisco, and delivered on cars at Fresno 
city at 4^ cents per pound. The extra care and 
expense involved in the packing is thus avoided. 

The Sultanas after drying are cleaned and put 
up in sacks of about 100 pounds each. As her 
Sultanas are very nice, she hoped to realize from 
their sale at least as much per pound as she did 
in the sale of her Muscats. The large, handsome 
bunches of the Sultanas on the vine when ripe, 
and before picking commences, furnish a 
magnificent spectacle. The flavor and size of 
the Muscat raisin secures for it among consum 
ers a popularity that bids fair to continue its 
reputation among growers as the most profit- 
able variety. McD. 

Fresno Co. 



Sulphuring Vines, 

Editors Press: — I have read in your valu- 
able paper many comments on mildew on 
grapevines and remedies for the same. Many 
of them, however, were theoretical; and think- 
ing that practical experience may be of use to 
some of your readers, and to confirm the theo- 
ries already advanced, I beg leave to give you 
my experience. 

I find that sulphuring can hardly be done too 
soon, particularly in localities where the vines 
are subject to the disease. I commence when 
the shoots are but an inch or two long and when 
many of them are but just starting. At this 
early stage but little sulphur is required, and, 
with me, has proved a very efi'ectual preventive 
of disease. It also has the effect of destroying 
a small black borer which makes its appearance 
at about that time and does considerable dam- 
age if let alone. 

The second sulphuring is applied by me when 
the vines are in blossom. These two sulphur- 
ings, if well done, and a good article of sulphur 
employed, are sufficient to check mildew. 
There may appear a few isolated cases of sickly 
vines later in the season, but with care they 
also can be cured. 

The different qualities of sulphur have also 
been discussed in your paper. We have tried 
them all, and I, for one, am convinced that 
there is no economy in using any but the best. 
Last year I used a Belgian sulphur, branded 
Koch & Reis, which can be found, probably, at 
any wholesale druggist's. In former years, al- 
though always sulphuring, employing " French 
sublimed," " French rolled," Sicilian and 
American, I have always suffered more or less 
from mildew, whereas, last year, employing the 
Belgian, not over a dozen vines were affected 
out of over 40 acres. A neighbor who used the 
American article, and in larger proportions than 
I, suffered considerably from mildew. 

The time may come when our country will 
produce an article as good as the imported one, 
but my experience teaches me that such time 
has not yet arrived. Henry Mel. 

Olenviood, Santa Cruz Co. 



Grape-Grafting. 

Editors Press: — Three years ago this win- 
ter, I set eight or ten acres to grape cuttings, 
that I supposed were of the Muscat variety. 
Last year, when they came to bear, not more 
than half were of that variety, the balance be- 
ing Black Kamburgs, Missions and some others 
that 1 have not learned the names of. I wish 
to graft these with the Muscats, and so write 
for information to the Rural, hoping some one 
or more of the correspondents of the paper may 
be able to give a minute description of the 
process, and also best time of grape-grafting, 
and greatly oblige Reader. 

Wilmington, Los Angeles Co. 



Lung Disease in Fowls. 

Editors Press : — I have made a discovery 
in regard to poultry which may be of interest 
to the readers of the Press. Last spring, while 
living at Santa Cruz, I had a brood of Lang- 
shan chickens which I prized very highly. 
There came on a cold, wet spell of weather, and 
having to move from one portion of the town to 
another, and the place that we moved to be- 
ing infested with rats, consequently I had to 
house my chickens in close quarters at night to 
keep them from being destroyed by the vermin. 
The result was that my chicks became diseased 
and they gave forth a stench from their nostrils 
that was quite offensive. Aa soon as the 
chicks were old enough to be moved to the 
perches in the poultry-house I began to carry 



them to the chicken-house where I kept the 
rest of the poultry, but they would as persist- 
ently return to their former coop. Some of my 
chicks gave forth a peculiar piping sound. I 
gave internally and applied externally various 
remedies, but all to no avail. They ate well, 
but began to get poor in flesh. One of the 
largest and poorest of the lot I killed for dis- 
section. I examined the ce^ophagus, crop, 
larynx and nasal passages and found tliem in a 
normal condition. I next directed my atten- 
tion to the lungs, and there I found the seat of 
the disease. Part of the lung substance was 
shriveled, and in the portions that were not 
shriveled tuberculosis was well marked — in 
other words, my chickens had consumption of 
the lung substance, with asthmatic symptoms. 
The lesson should teach us that poultry, as 
well as human beings, need plenty of pure, 
fresh air. Dr. O. F. Shaw. 

Oakland, Cal. 



German Method of Preserving Eggs. 

Editors Press: — Will you please publish in 
the Rural the German mode of keeping eggs? 
In the winter of 1884-85, I used, in Philadel- 
phia, eggs sent from Germany, and they seem- 
ed perfectly fresh, and unlike the "limed" 
eggs. We could boil them without the shell 
cracking. Mrs. J. H. Thomas. 

White River, Tulare Co. 

[Perhaps some of our readers can give the 
method desired. — Eds. Press.] 



Dehorning Cattle. 

Editors Press: — In your issue of December 
4th I noticed an article from the pen of W. A. 
Henry, Director of the Wisconsin Agricultural 
Experiment Station, in regard to dehorning 
bulls. Now if they are so dangerous why not 
dehorn all when young and avoid the necessity 
of this severe operation when they are grown ? 
Thinking some of your many readers may be 
interested, I venture to give some of my boy- 
hood experience. 

When a lad of six or seven years of age, I re- 
member being at Grandfather Murray's, in 
Maryland, when they were handling a lot of 
calves, and I asked mother what they were 
doing. She replied they were burning their 
horns to make " Mulleys " of them. I also re- 
member that grandfather had a number of horn- 
less cows. 

We afterward migrated to Ohio; my uncle, 
.James Benson, was already living there, and as 
years passed on I learned that he was treating 
his calves in the same manner, and a large pro- 
portion of his cows were without horns; occa- 
sionally one would have a small horn curled 
down close to the head; but most of them were 
80 completely without horns that no one would 
ever suspect but that they were naturally polled 
cattle. At one time the neighbors thought he 
had quite an advantage. They had an assessor 
who interpreted the blank forms literally. 
They had a blank for " horned cattle " (in con- 
tradistinction to horses, mules, etc.); so he as 
sessed none that were without horns, and conse- 
quently they escaped taxation. My uncle had 
some cows with horns, for at times in a busy 
season they were neglected until it was too late 
to make the operation a success; so they were 
allowed to wear their horns. I never saw the 
operation performed, but my uncle informed me 
upon inquiry that all that was necessary was to 
burn the horns with a hot iron just as they 
began to show through the hair. 

Tracy, Cal. J. M. Kerlinger. 

Another Way to Get the Horns Off. 

There is still another way to get a hornless 
herd, and we admit we like it best of all. Our 
friend A. W. Cheever, editor of the iVew E/i- 
gland Farmer, tells about it as follows: Pure 
bred polled bulls have great power for breeding 
the horns off from other cattle, particularly 
from the Jerseys and Shorthorns which' have 
horns rather under medium size, and from the 
common native cattle of the country. When 
in Chicago a few weeks since, it was our pleas- 
ure to be present at an annual meeting of the 
Red Polled Cattle Club of America, an organiza- 
tion that has been in existence only about three 
years, but which has done some excellent work 
in introducing polled dairy and beef stock into 
this country and in awakening an interest in 
polled cattle. Just before the close of the meet- 
ing a census was taken to learn how man;' 
polled cattle were represented by the members 
present. Many of the members reported more 
grades than pure breds (though there are near- 
ly COO of the latter ready for registering), and 
the writer asked what he was to understand 
was meant by the term "grade poll," whether 
the half or three-quarter bloods, having horns, 
could be called grade polls. The answer given 
by Mr. .T. G. Murray, treasurer of the club, was 
that the grades very seldom have horns; he bad 
never seen or heard of any among the breeders 
of red polls. The general absence of horns on 
the grade polled Angus is probably equally 
noticeable. In our own experience in breeding 
from pure polled cattle, the horns were exceed- 
ingly rare on the progeny, and in breeding from 
grade polled bulls the heifer calves rarely had 
hof^jsf the bulU were more U^eljr to have them. 



[Z^ORTICULTUI^E. 



Notes on Pruning. 

Editors Press: — The weather is still dry, 
with cold nights and north winds. Last night 
we had a little frost and the first ice of the 
winter, which was thick as window glass. We 
had about one and one-half inches of rain last 
week, and the ground is wet enough to work 
well. Many are plowing in their orchards and 
vineyards. It is early yet to plow, as the weeds 
are not large, but if the rain should fall short, 
those that plow early, often and deep will get 
the best crops. 

Pruning vines was commenced here before 
the grapes and leaves were off of the vines, 
which was much.earlier than common. Vines 
pruned early start to grow sooner than those 
pruned late, and so are more liable to be caught 
by the frost. Generally, those that are afraid 
of frost put off pruniug as long as the sap does 
not run free enough to cause the vines to bleed 
badly. Tokay viues should have much more 
wood left on than other kinds, especially where 
there is much wind. When there are but few 
buds, they grow very rapidly, are very tender, 
and often the wind strips the vines, whereas if 
there are a large number of buds they do not 
grow so rank, but much stronger, and protect 
each other. 

Young peach trees are not so apt to drop 
their fruit if pruned late, and I think other 
trees that drop their fruit might be benefited 
by late pruning. 

The " Long French " prune but seldom bears 
a full crop here. It does well until the prunes 
are one-third grown, when they fall off. Other 
prunes are not troubled in that way. Pear and 
prune trees, after the third year, should be left 
one year without pruning. This will cause the 
tree to form a head instead of running into 
long, thin switches, and cause the fruit buds to 
form. 

Many people see the mistake they made years 
ago in trimming their trees up and starting 
them to branch out two or three feet from the 
ground. With a tree, to make a success, you 
must have good material to start with; then it 
is easy to guide it properly if you know how; 
but once make a mistake and it can never be 
corrected. Fruit trees that have to be gone 
over two or three times to gather the fruit 
should start to branch out not more than 
a foot from the ground. Then, if cut back 
properly when it is five years old, the head is 
formed, and a map can stand on the ground or 
on a very short ladder and gather the fruit. It 
is much cheaper to hire four feet square of 
ground around the tree spaded up than to hire 
a man to run up and down a tall ladder to pick 
the fruit. Heavy pruning will cause a large 
growth of wood, and light pruning will cause 
the tree to set full of bloom buds. 

Cherry and almond buds are beginning to 
swell, and will blossom in two weeks if warm 
weather holds. G. 

Vacaville, Jan. 9. 

Division of Pomology; Department of 
Agriculture. 

Editors Press: — I have read with much in 
terest your account of the Citrus Fair, in Sac- 
ramento, and other pomological matter in late 
copy of your paper. This division has only 
been established this winter by Act of Congress, 
which took effect the first day of last July. 
We hope to make it a means of good to the 
people of California as well as the States on this 
side the mountains. If you will kindly men- 
tion the fact of its establishment and ask your 
readers to communicate with me on any pomo- 
logical matters, and especially regarding new 
fruits, it will be gratifying and I trust helpful 
to each other. The fiuit industry is one of the 
main sources of the wealth of California and 
needs all the help it can get. It is my purpose 
to visit your State to examine into the facta 
upon the ground at my first possible opportu- 
nity. Respectfully, H. E. Van Deman, 

Chief of Div'n of Pomology, Dept. of Agr. 
Washington, D. C. 

[We are glad to hear from Mr. Van Deman, 
whom we have known for some time by 
his reputation in connection with pomologi- 
cal matters. No doubt the California fruit- 
growers will be glad to see him out here and ti 
aid him in his useful work in every possible 
way. — Eds. Press.] 

Assessment of Trees and Vines. 

Editors Press: — There is legislation much 
needed to stay the practice of assessing fruit 
and ornamental trees and vines separate from 
the land — that is, trees and vines not of natural 
growth, but those that have been transplanted. 
The culture is laudable, and deserves encour- 
agement as other industries of the State. 

There is nothing in the State Constitution de- 
fining the trees and vines as improvements. 
There are, however, structures, always known 
as the improvements — such as the usual build- 
ings and fencing; they are assessed separately 
from the land on whii*!, these rest, and these 
only. Sach being my view, I should be »at- 
isfiea wifh the repeal of the statutory prpviBiqn, 



unsupported by the Constitution or lawful 
ueage, and thus have a speedy and deserved 
remedy. Never will the like be re enacted. 

Again, further, there is no good law in dis- 
tinguishing between laudable and, at the same 
time, lawful agricultural industries in this 
State. In this latter view the enactment ia 
void. 

Were I a member of the Assembly — which I 
am not, and shall never be — I would unhesitat- 
ingly offer a bill for the repeal of the statute. 

But for prolonging this piece, I would inform 
you of the wrongs inflicted. I reserve this part 
until called for, should there be occasion. 

San Francisco. Charles Aiken. 



@JHEEja AND (JToOL. 



The Angora Goat Register. 

Editors Press:— Since the establishment of 
a register for Angora goats, viz. : of pure- 
bloods or Class 1, and high-grades or Class 2, 
by the American Mohair-Growers' Associa- 
tion, at their meeting at San Antonio, Texas, 
held on the fourth and fifth days of October, 
1886, which proceedings appeared in the Rural 
Press in its issue of Nov. Gth, the advantages 
derive! from said register are generally admit> 
ted by the breeders of Texas; and it appears 
that it will be to the interests of the California 
breeders, at their meeting in September next, 
to face the question squarely; and to discuss 
matters connected therewith thoroughly, 
through the columns of the Rural Press, 
will help the cause. The Texas Farm and 
Ranch of recent date gives the views of G. A. 
Hoerle, corresponding secretary of the Ameri- 
can Mohair-Growers' Association, on the im- 
portance of a register, as follows: 

"A joint co-operation of all breeders ia in- 
dispensable for the success of the industry, and 
the success of the industry at large necessarily 
must be an advantage to every individual 
breeder of good stock. The owner of high- 
bred stock will be benefited by a union to se- 
cure the sale of bis animals, and should expose 
every case of fraud which comes to his knowl- 
edge. So should the owner of grades, for he 
needs a union to help him protect his pocket- 
book, and it is high time that every honest 
breeder should recognize this fact and act ac- 
cordingly. We need a strong association, ex- 
tending all over the Union, and a carefully kept 
register." 

At the Texas meeting above referred to, 
committees were appointed, one to represent 
the pure-blood breeders and one the grade 
breeders, who were instructed to define certain 
points of excellence, by degrees, to each class 
of Angoras. This committee adopted rules for 
registry, which were printed in the Rural 
Press of Nov. 5th last, and there were also 
elected ten members for examining commission- 
ers of Angora goats, whose duty it will be to 
examine goats presented to them and to issue 
permits for registry to the keeper of the regis- 
ter for Texas, according to the ciaas to which 
they belong. 

The Texas Association will hold its next 
meeting on the first Monday of June next. 

The Angora goat-breeders of California, at 
their meeting on Sept. 16th last, discussed the 
question of joining the American Mohair- 
Growers' Association of Texas to establish a 
standard for a pura-blood Angora goat or a sys- 
tem of registry, and it was resolved that action 
on this subject be laid over until the next an- 
nual meeting. 

Now as the Texas breeders have already es- 
tablished a register for the Angora goat, we 
cannot delay acting on this subject at our next 
meeting at Sacramento, and to do justice to the 
matter it should be discussed. California 
breeders who desire to join the association and 
assist the goat industry by their counsel and in 
other ways can become members by sending 
12.50 to the secretary, aud their names will be 
entered as members of the association. 

Julius Weyand, 
Sec'y Angora Goat-Breeders' Ass'n. 

Colusa, Cal. 



Unshod Horses. — Mr. P. H. Fagin, a fur- 
niture and piano mover at Maiden, Mass., gives 
his experience with barefooted horses. He 
has driven three horses (two weighing HOO 
pounds each and one 1.300 pounds) since Janu- 
ary, 1885, without shoes. The large horse has 
always been lame since he bought him 14 years 
ago, until he took his shoes off. The animal 
has not gone lame since. He has driven on 
hard, flint roads, and, of course, on pavements 
in Boston. The horses travel better than be- 
fore their «hoes were taken off. They are not 
afraid on slippery pavement as they were with 
shoes on, and there is no trouble in 
getting round on any kind of going in the city. 
Mr. Fagin drove to Shrewsbury, 35 miles from 
Maiden, after two days' rain, in February, 
1885, when it was so icy that a boy could skate 
all the way, and had no trouble. He left home 
at 7 a. m., arrived at Shrewsbury at 3:40 P. M., 
and the horses did not slip. The hoof is hard 
and broad, and the frog is full and plump and 
on a level. They have driven two winters on 
ice and snow altogether better than when they 
were shod. Their feet are better for all pur- 
poses, they can trot faster, pull as much and go 
more miles in the same time than they ooul4 
when 8hO(J, — Boston Herald, 



64 



pACIFie I^URAId f RESa 



[Jan. 22, 1887 



Jl^ATF^ONS OF pE^USB/rNDRY. 



Correspomlenie on Grange principles and work and re- 
ports of transat-tioDs of subordinate Granges are respect- 
fully solicited for this department. 



Joint Installation at Sacramento. 

Editors Press: — The 8th of January was a 
beautiful winter day. It was the occasion for 
installing officers of both the Pomona and 
subordinate Granges for 1887, which took 
place at 1 o'clock at the hall of the G. G. B. 
Association. The day was also set apart for the 
inauguration of the Governor and Lieutenant- 
Governor of the State at the capitol, which 
brought together a great concourse of citizens. 
A large number of P. of H. attended the joint 
installation. At 12 m. all repaired to the ban- 
quet hall, and prepared the inner man for the 
duties of the afternoon. On reassembling the 
officers-elect were called from both Gransps 
and took seats set in cross range of hall. W. 
M. S. G., Wm. Johnston, officiated as installing 
officer with his asfiistants. Sisters Hattie Jones, 
of Yuba Grange, and .Tackman, of Sacramento 
Grange. The W. M. gave the class a fine 
lecture on the duties before them — perhaps one 
of his best eflforts during the years of connec- 
tion with the Order. Bro. A. A. Krull.W. M.- 
olect of Pomona Grange, No. 2, in taking the 
chair, delivered the following address: 

Sisters and Brothers — I thank you for your 
kind appreciation. In assuming this office to 
which I have been chosen, I realize well the 
importance of the position and the obligation 
taken with the pledge to fulfill the duties of the 
office as Master of this Grange. I feel that I 
need your assistance to accomplish the work 
that we were organized for. Its organization 
is designed to strengthen the subordinate 
Granges. The first and most important duty, 
when elected to an office, is to faithfully per- 
form whatever duty is assigned. I hold when 
a member is elected to an office it is his duty 
to promptly fill his place and study to do it 
well. Every member should be courteous to 
all, honest in all dealings with his fellow-men, 
chaste in thought and language, pure in heart 
and life, an earnest seeker after knowledge, a 
zealous Patron, a true patriot and an in- 
telligent philanthropist. An Order so com- 
posed would be strong and useful in promoting 
the interest of agriculture of all classes. Fel- 
low-Patrons I let us ever respect our profession, 
and bear in mind that moral and mental worth 
ranks before worldly wealth or honor, and as 
Worthy Patrons in our glorious fraternity, we 
can justly claim to belong to the true nobility 
of the land. 

As the W. M. -elect of Sacramento Grange, 
W. W. Greer, was introduced, the retiring 
Master, G- W. Hack, made a few remarks, 
and the former responded, thanking him for 
his kind greeting, reviewed his past adminis- 
tration and congratulated him on his success, 
saying that words cannot express the deep sen 
timent of esteem and gratitude the members of 
Sacramento Grange owed to him for the labor 
he had performed and the good he had accom- 
plished. Bro. Greer said his earnest hope was 
that he might be able to present an adminis- 
tration productive of as much good, and be 
able to retire from office with as good a record. , 
He appreciated the mark of their esteem, and 
would long retain in his memory the compli- 
ment they had paid him. remembering the day 
with feelings of the greatest pleasure and pride. 
He said he was not unmindful of the many re- 
sponsibilities that would devolve upon 
him in his position as Master, but hoped 
to discharge them in a manner that 
would reflect credit on himself and be 
acceptable to the Order, and would use 
his utmost endeavor to conduct their business 
and preside over their meetings in such a man- 
ner as to merit the respect and approval of all. 
He hoped the succeeding year would be one of 
pleasure and profit; requested all members to 
put forth their utmost individual and united 
eflforts for the good of this Grange, with the beat 
interest of the Order at large. He closed by 
asking all Patrons to try and introduce the no- 
ble principle of our Order into their Uvea, and 
labor to carry out our Declaration of Purposes. 

The W. M., in giving the obligation, stated 
he would follow the course that the W. M . of the 
K. G. did at the last session, which he thought 
was far better than the old way — that was, to 
read it, and let the officers accept the same. 
All the officers were introduced and made short 
speeches, showing willingness to fill their re- 
spective chairs to the best of their power and 
usefulness to the Order. 

At no previous time in the history of Sacra- 
mento Grange have so many young members 
assumed positions within the gift of the Order. 
Eleven out of thirteen are young sisters and 
brothers, and seven of the whole number 
are sisters. The old members have given 
way to allow them to step forward. The charge 
was given them by the \V. M. S. G. at the 
opening : that the •:;ift of the office means some- 
thing more than filling it; work must be per- 
formed to make it a success — the ladder of fame 
requires step by step to reach the last round, 
and the ones who gain it stand high in the esti- 
mation and approval of their fellow-man. The 
Grange intends to stdod by and encourage them 
in their work; make it a school for them; edu- 
cate t